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CITY COUNCIL. INSTALLATION OF MAYOR.

ffhe annual meeting of the City Council, at which tho now Mayor of Ohristchurch was dftly installed, was held at the City Council Chambers at noon to-day, Presont— The late Mayor, Cr. Thomson (the presont Mayor), {Councillor C. T. Ick), Councillors Gapos, Cass, Jenkins, Tremayne, Wilson, Binstoad, Byres, Clifford, Messrs Ruddenklau, Mitchell, IA. Duncan, T.B. Craig, W. Pratt, J. Bird, Eobbs, O. E. Briggs, H. E. Alport, J. P. /Jameson, Toomer, G. L. Leo, E. B. Bishop, Biokerton.

The Mayor (Mr Thomson) said it was now for him to resign his position to his successor. The first thing- to be done would be tho Mayor elect signing the declaration. The now Mayor having duly signed the book.

Mr Thomson asked the now Mayor to tako the chair.

Upon Mr Ick taking tho chair, Mr Thomson invested the now Mayor with tho badge of oflice, which he said was now assuming proportions somewhat in kcoping with those of the now occupant of tho croas-chair. (Laughter). The Mayoral chain now has nine links. The Mayor reminded those prosent that a vote of thanks to tho retiring Mayor should bemoved.

Councillor Gapes liad great pleasuro in proSwing a -"vote "of thanks to the retiring Mayor, o could soy that since he had resumed a scat at the Counoil ho could not but admire the business manner in which the late Mayor had transacted its business.

Councillor Wilson seconded the motion. He thought this would come witli good taste from him (he speaker), because he had soveral timos found fault with His Worship. (Laughter.) Councillors Cass, Ayers, and Tremayne Bupported the motion.

Councillor lok, in presenting the voto of thanks, complimented Mr Thomson on the orderly manner in whioh the business of the Council had been conducted during tlie last year.

Mr Thomson briefly acknowledged tho compliment. He would have a better opportunity of addressing those present when he would speak at greater longfch. This closed the business portion of the meeting. Refreshments having been brought, The Mayor proposed "The Health of Her Majesty the Queen," Ho was sure he spoke the sentiments of aU present and of the whole community in expressing deep sympathy with her in the loss of her second daughter the Princess Alice.

The next toast, "The Prince of Wales and the Royal Family," was proposed by His Worship the Mayor, who referred to the talked of visit of the Prince of Wales to the Colonies. Should he visit Christohurch he

would be greeted with a righfc loyal reception, (Cheers.):. Ay-yk-'zZ.A^ZZzZz i >ZyA. The; Mayor propoßed^^e wvernor of New]ssealand, a real old English gentleman, and one of the most popular Governors we ever ' Had,*' (Cheers;) y \y y Mr Thomson proposed—" Tbdhew Mayor." (Applause.) The present Mayor %ad had a number of years' expSjiience in the Council, and tbat would be of great; service to him in the to^vhich lie, >had arrived after fiomoyears of hai'diwsrki;^Although ho had opposed Mr Ick at the election, he would Bay thafc'the "right; man was in fche right place." His private friendsliip for the Mayor was no less than it had been. He hoped the civic chair would be found a "bed of rosea," though it was nofc always so. Much would depend upon the consideration shown by the other members of the Counoil. (Cheei'Si) And " one more for the Mayoress." The Mayor thanked those/present foi? the kind way in which his invitation had been accepted. The presence of old ; Mayors and Counoillora on an occasion like -the present strengthened the position of the liew ! Major. He. was naturally a" nervous man— (ldlightev)— even fcho first Mayor, tvhen taking the chair for, the first time, wos< nervous. (Laughter.) So ifc was with Mr Hobbs ; but there was nothing surprising ".at that, as he ' was notoriously a, modest man. Hia im'me-* diate successor, a native, and " to the manner, born," had even been nervous. He agreed with the last speaker, that the election opposition should be ; now forgotten. He felfc Biire i fchafc the Councillors, would exercise in his, f avour _ forbearance and patience, and would give him fche assistance he would require, j The present Council had been called novices: He thought they were colts who promised to go well in harness. He had been told there wero , few mathematicians in the ,Coun?cil, he had • replied .: that they were not wanting ,, in - Divinity. (Laughter.) To be serious he intended to do his duty in a becoming and independent manner. He hoped) that all present would give their assistance in , bringing the auctions of the water supplY: and the erection of municipal buildings to a successful isßue. ; [Re begged all to unite witF hini -in carrying oufc the public busineas, witfl a single view to the welfare of Christchurchj He again thanked fchem for the manner in which they^had drunk" his health. ..(Cheers). The May6r l^oposod,^- "The ? Retiring Mayor," vvho had ; done his, duty admirably during his term of office. He knew no'gentleman who had been .more punctual in his attcndanceitHo^oiUdnbtgivea fig for a man' who had nofc the courage of Ms opinions,' Mr Thomson had acted in a straightforward ' and c manly way. No man was in better circum* stances to take a prominent position than Mr Thomson, and he believed fchafc gentleman would always be found active in:, the public servic^ (Cheers). ii Z..>ZZZ\.' Mr Thomson : returned thanks for the enthusiastic manner in which the toast had been responded to. He .could look back at his experience, and from it learn that lie liad made mistakes. To have " the courage of his opinions," was nob always fche way to make oneself popular. He had done his .best, and had done nothing which he knew to be wrong. Whatever mistakes had been made were errors of judgmont. He had spent much time in the public service, bufc had felfc pleasure in doing so. In benefiting others ho had benefitted himselE. A great maoy duties had devolved upon him which probably "would not devolve upon his successor. He alluded particularly to the Hospital Board. The work would nofc be so heavy in future, as it was to bo done by Committees. The present Mayor would be on tho Board. He- (the speaker) waa now oufc of harness. After a spell he would nofc be disinclined to accede to the wiahes of the oitizens to enter their ser.vice again at some future time. (Cheera.)

Mr '■■Ei B. Bishop proposed "The City Council." The present Mayor was a man of experience. Councillor Wilson had had lai'ge experience, so it wiis with Councillor Gapes. The other gentlemen had yet to learn their business, but he was quite sure they would do their duty, for the City Council was looked upon as tho " pick of the City." He coupled the toast with the name of Councillor Gapes. (Olieers.) Councillor Gapes' responded. He thought the new members promised well to form a good Council ; the manner in whioh they had fallen in to their work had excited liis surprise. He had no doubt that the improvements of the City would be properly carod for. " '■ . t\ Councillor Wilson also responded. Ho re^ ferred in the course of his speech to the probability of an abundant water supply being soon provided from the Avon. 110 also advocated the speedy erection of Municipal! buildinga. -. ' Zy Councillor Jenkins briefly responded. Councillor Cass congratulated his Worship On tlie cordial reception ho had met with. The Council would, he was sure, support tho Mayor. Councillor A^ers, in returning thanks, expressed his gratification at noticing the fearlessness whicli characterised the Council. The now members had beon called colts. It was well to havo a good break-horse. This fchey had in the prosent Mayor, and had had in the retiring Mayor. Councillor Clifford said he was not much of a speaker ; his ideas generally got ahead of his language. He would say thafc he would support the water supply and tho Municipal buddings. (Applause.) Councillor Binsfcead ventured to say that fche present Council could got through as much talk as anybody. They could spend all tho monoy at tlieir disposal, and ho believed their spending would bo found advantageous to the cifcy.

Councillor Tremayne also returned thanks. He referred fco the immediato necossifcy for a water scheme and Municipal ofliees. Mr W, Pratt proposod " The ex-Mayors." In doing so he , eulogised tho character of fchoso who had passed fche Munioipal ohair. Few places had been so fortunate in this respect as Ohristchurch. Tho toast was drunk wifch musical honours.

Oounoillor Wilson (the firsfc Mayor of Chrisfcchureh) was the firsfc tb respond. Ho could say thafc of the Councillors over whom he had had tho honour to preside, six had subsequently become Mayor. Ho referred to the wretched condition of the city previous to -his time, and tho rapid' iinprovoment made since. (Cheors.) [At this stago Mr Sawtoll entered tho room.] Mr A. Duncan, in acknowledging fcho toasfc, apologised for fcho absence of Mr Anderson. Ho was in favour of the election of Mayors by tho Councils. Tho past year had been marked by tlio loss of ox-Mayor Harfc and exCouncillor Calverfc.

Mr Jameson, in responding, said ho was happy fco know that fchoro were as good fish in the sea as had been taken out of ifc. (Cheers), Mr H. Sawtoll, in returning thanks, expressed his belief thafc the cifcizcons had succeeded in obtaining good representatives. Ho hopod tho prosont Mayor would find tho torm of office a pleasant one. Ho regretted to learri that the late' Mayor would not continuo as councillor to givo liis services to tho cifcy. Ho hoped to see him again in the Oounoil. Whether fche Mayor was elected by tho Coun. cil or by tho citizens he thought that a member of the Council should be chosen.

Mr E. B. Bishop looked baok with pioasuro to the time when ho entered oflico. A time of doubt and darkness succeeded, but in it, ho had, ho trusted, dono. his duty, (Cheers,) Mr Hobbs took, the opportunity ta congratulate the Mayabr, and to pay a tribute of respect to his (Mr Hobbs') predecessor, Mr Hart. Ho would), also like to mention another old friend/x Councillor Jones. Ho hoped to sco Ghrfstchiirch one of the greatest; cities in the Southern Hemisphere. As far as his effort wonfc, he would do his best to achievo that result. He hoped to see a comSletc .system of drainago soon completed. Ins Would be necessitated by the marvellous advancement which he felt confident would bo made by the city in the next ton years. Ho would advocate the joining to tho cifcy of ' all tho outside Municipalities. (Hear, hear); He was sure the present Council would do their best in the interest of the Cifcy. Ho agreed with Mr Duncan that the Mayor should be elected by_ the Counoil instead of hy the ratepayers. He hoped some day when he had the necessary leisure to be able again to give hiß services fco the City. As far as he

1111 '■■■»' could % he would support the Council in the question of water supply and, Municipal buildings. Councillor Gapes in returning thanks said he was in favour of money being borrowed for the water supply. Ex-Mayor Thomson said he was the " last of the Mayors." He! had never wavered in his opinion that the Mayor should be elected by the Council out of the Council. The Mayor was fche Chairman of the Counoil, and the Council was surely best able to cliooso the best man. He had hoped that during his term of office fchey would have had now municipal offices. He hoped that the Council woidd agree that the 'Town Hall and City Offices should be contiguous. He was sorry fchafc the piece of ground which he thought the city had secured, had, at the last moment, slipped through their fingers. He recom- : mended the Council nob to lose sight of the land he referred to, and believed that they , mighfc yefc secure ifc. (Cheers.)

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Bibliographic details

CITY COUNCIL. INSTALLATION OF MAYOR., Star, Issue 3338, 18 December 1878

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CITY COUNCIL. INSTALLATION OF MAYOR. Star, Issue 3338, 18 December 1878

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