Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

The Star. THURSDAY, NOV. 14, 1878.

We have been ready to do all justice to Councillor Ick. As a member of the Oity Council he has given a great deal of his time, and brought much shrewd* ness and business experience to the service of the ratepayers. The citizens ought, upon all ordinary occasions, to remember with gratitude the services rendered to them by pubfio men in every sphere of usefulness, for indeed they have no other reward for their labours than such remembrance affords. There is no one who will deny that Councillor Ick has deserved weli of the city, and this reflection makes the duty of those who are bound to point out the in? jurious results almost certain to follow from his election all the more painful to discharge. Nevertheless, it is bur duty to repeat, and to keep on repeating, that no citizen, however great his individual claims may be, has a right to seek such a position as that of the Chief Magistrate of the City in any way other tban through the votes of the ratepayers. Wehave charged Councillor Ick with having done so; we have Btated some of the grounds upon which the charge was based, and that the charge was well founded seems to bo admitted. The ratepayers may possibly hold the view that respect for; their is of 4 little consequenco; they possibly may deem Councillor Wilson so transcendentally able and honest, that any nominee of his in any position is quite good enough for them. W"e do not see that the attitude of the Press should be in any way affected by such considerations. A proper respeot for the ratepayers whom Councilor Ick olaims to represent; a regard for* public decency ; his own honour and independence— should have inspired him with the consciousness that, if he became Mayor of Ohristchurch, it should not be under the degrading suspicion of having pandered to any one for the posi* tion. But when it is remembered that it is to no other than an individual of the character of Councillor Wilson that the free voice of the ratepayers has been held subordinate, then it is imperative that Councillor Ick, with all his years of service thick upon him, should

be taught that personal claims nmst be held of nonweight. against publio principle. That the road to the oivio throne does not run through ouy one man, muoh less through the Councillor to whom he has thought proper to play so subservient and unworthy a part. The evils resulting from the presence of alow character of mind are already beginning t6 be felt in the affairs of the city. Cliques and coteries are an evil to be avoided by every publio body. If not repressed their tendencies are " untriiiftakeably and obviously ; dangerous. Now, there are not wanting signs that thiß «city. is aboufc to fall under thedomination of a clique, and ifc is the duty of all respectable oitizens to guard against a very seriouß possible danger. The danger is all the greater because there is eyery reason to fear, that several respeotable publio men, who should know better, have weakly allowed thetnselves to surrender their better 3 ndg. ment, and to be inveigled into a false position. We say that there are not wanting signs that this is correct. Eumours of a mendacious character are now readily put into circulation, and there are other indications to which we have not space to refer to-day of the municipally evil days now hanging over the city. Councillor Ick's position, however, is most clear. He has paid Councillor Wilson the compliment of regarding him as the greatest power in the city. To obtain his support Councillor Ick has thrown away independence and become his obsequious tool. Councillor Wilson's vanity has been so inflated with the flattering attention that he cannot conceal his gratification and swells with pvide. This is whafc we have come to, and it is a position which no ratepayer who values his privileges, or the honour of the corporate body should tamely Bubmit to. Gladly would we have supported Councillor Ick had he relied upon hiß own merits, bufc as the first joint in Councillor Wilson's tail his election must be regarded as a calamity second only to the election of Councillor Wilson himself.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18781114.2.5

Bibliographic details

The Star. THURSDAY, NOV. 14, 1878., Star, Issue 3309, 14 November 1878

Word Count
721

The Star. THURSDAY, NOV. 14, 1878. Star, Issue 3309, 14 November 1878

Working