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LOCAL AND GENERAL.

— «.. - Atjstbahak TBI.EffBAMS.~TIi© Dunedin Star publishes the following items from Australia: — Sidney, May 11. •• Bishop Tjrell, of Newcastle, leaves £250,000 to endow English churches within the diocese. His sister gives £6000 to the Sick Fund.— The Government have fined Mr Wakefield £10,400 and Ames Bros. £7600 for not completing their railway jcgntracts. The Bibke Chbistians.— The tender of : Messrs Eastrick Bros., for the erection of a Bible Christian Church at Aldington, has been accepted ; and the building, Which is to accommodate one hundred persons, is to be commenced forthwith. A site of land lor a church at Philipstown has been presented to the Bible Christians, and it is their intention to build a church thereon with all convenient speed. The German Church in Montreal street has been engaged by the same body, and divine service will be held there during th£» winter months. CTCANTEBBUBY COTJB8IN& CITJB. — A special meeting : of the committee of the Canterbury Coursing Club was held yesterday ; Present -f-Mr Andrew Duncan (in the chair), and Messrs Anson, Disher, Hill, and Walker. The question of receiving entries sent in after the advertised time of dosing was considered, and it was resolved that the Committee could not break the regulations— in other words that they could not receive entries made after the proper time. At the same time the Committee regretted that: Mr Dunn had failed to make his entries in' due cor.rse. Theatrical. — The following is the cast of " Henry IV." at the Aucklard theatre :— Sir John Fahtaff,jiMr John Jack; Prince Hal, Miss Annie Firman ; King Henry IV., Mr Ohas. Burford ; Prince John, Miss L.May; Hotspur, Mr J. B. Steele j Earl of Worcester, Mr John Musgrave ; Eail of Northumberland, Mr J. Tyrell ; Earl of Westmoreland, Mr B. Johnson; Earl of Douglas, Mr O. Cassell ; Sir Sichard Vernon, Mr E. Purnell ; Sir Walter Blunt, Mr George Eeed ; Ned Poms, Mr J. O'Brien; Francis, Mr H. Emmett j Bardolph, Mr H. Simmonds ; Gadshill, Mr L. Smith; Peto, Mr F. Mason j Sheriff, Mr H. Underwood ; Lady Percy, Mrs Walter Hill ; the Hostess, Miss J. Eaymond ; Eaby, Miss Cora M'lna. — The wizard Ben Allah gave his final entertainment in Dunedin on Saturday evening. In the course of the evening, great amusement was created by a live pig, which formed one of the gifts, intruding itself on the stage while Mr Love was singing, and insisting on converting the serio-comic ballad, " Out in the Green Fields," into a duet. Thbatbe RoYAii. — The performance of "The Lady of Lyonpj" at the Theatre Eoyal last evening was a marked success, and the management may well be congratulated upon having been enabled to produce this favourite j play m so perfect a manner. As Pauline, Mis 3 Tilly Andrews took high rank as an actress, acting and looking the character excellently, and investing it with a graceful simplicity of bearing thafc was most pleasing. That Bhe should have been so warmly ! applauded for her efforts was but natural, j and Mr Graham, it need scarcely be said, shared with her in the honiours of the evening. Of the Colonel Damsa of Mr Hoskins it 19 only required to state that he gave one of those high class delineations'- for which he has so high a reputation. Mass Lucy Ashton appearod as Madame Dcschappelles, and Miss Marie Wilton as the Widow Melnotte. The remaining character* were well filled, and it should bo added that, the dressing and mounting of the piece was highly creditable. The play for this evening is •' East Lynne," with Miss Tilly Andrews iv the dual charac-

ter of Lady Isabel and Madame Vine, Mr Hoskins as Levison, and Mr Graham as Archibald Carlyle. Civit, Seevioe Examinations.— Amended ru vf. t OT * the Sorvice examination are published m the Gazette. County Atjditob.— Mr J. Ollivier has been appointed auditor for the Counties of Ashburton and Akaroa. Sheep Inspection Katb.-^A rate has been struck, under tho Canterbury Sheep Ordinance, 1872, of 5s 6d per 600 Sheep. i™*, l^. 011 * 18 oy THB Colonies.—Governor Weld, in a speeoh delivered at Launoeston m Tasmania, on April 20, said that he had Colonel Scratchley's authority for otating that Hobart Town and King George's Sound were the points most valuable to an enemy , as strategical positions, and therefore most likely to be attacked. Those places could be made impregnable, and would entail great "effort* and immense expenditure to recover them if once lost. The speaker also mentioned the notable fact that Bussian newspapers had ately published the Colonial ' Bank returns, and mentioned the bullion as a valuable prize. This indeed looks like business. City Council.— a special meeting of the City Council was held yesterday, to pass the" accounts for the year; present— CouncillorIck, in the chair, and Messrs Bird, Euddenklau, Briggs, Toomer, Jameson, and Pratt. Councillor Ick stated the object of the meeting. Councillor Briggs said that as the Mayor, who was Chairman of the Finance Committee, was absent, he would move their adoption. The question had been raised whether the meeting could be held in the abaenoe of the Mayor, but the City Solicitor had given an opinion it could. The Mayor -would be back in time to sign the statement so as to have it sent in by June 1. The items for unpaid rates of former years, referred to in the last clause of the Auditors' report, had been written off. He then referred to an anomaly in connection with the Magistrate's Court. License fees under certain Acts, including those relating to publicans and dog-tax, were handed to Council, whereas the fines under the Acts went to the Government. In his opinion, the fines should be paid in the same direction as the licenses. Mr Bird seconded the motion. It appeared to him to he an extraordinary anomaly that the fines for non-registration of dogs should not go to the borough. He thought prominence should be given to the fact that the city had hardly anything in the way of reserves. The motion was adopted. This concluded the business; Thb Stabbing Cask. — The case in which a man named Badham^was oharged with cutting and wounding Sergeant Hughes, with intent to do him grievous bodily harm, was heard at the Resident Magistrate's Court yesterday. Mr Thomas, who appeared for the defence, held that under the circumstances the sergeant must be regarded as a common trespasser, and oited recent English cases to show that the resistance offered to him was perfectly justifiable, he having no warrant in his possession at the time. This would applyeven if the person concerned had not asked to see tho warrant, which Badham had several times done.- The law waß that in a case of felony a man might be arrested without a warrant, but not in the case of a misdemeanour. However, the charge against the accused might be made or worded, its legal position remained the same ; and in the case in point there was nothing to justify the arrest, nor was there any immediate reason for it. The sergeant foroed his way in without a -warrant, and the man might reasonably be supposed to have assumed that there was at that time no warrant against him. Mr Mellish would like the case to go for trial in order to get an expression of opinion from the Judge upon it. Not having had time to ■ look the matter up, he did not like himself to give an opinion, but perhaps Mr Thomas would leave with him the cases to which he had referred, and the matter could in the meantime be held over until Friday. ■• ■ - Paying the Pipbb.— The Pied Piper of Hamelin, as the old legend goes, when he oould not get payment for services rendered, revenged himself on his debtors, and a Christchurch piper has recently adopted a similar method. Mr Peiper had a debtor from whom he was excessively anxious to get payment. Apparently he had followed him to Lyttelton, fearing his hurried departure for " fresh fields and pastures new." 7 He found him in the British Hotel, and in a private room of the hostelry debtor and creditor faced the difficulty and one another. The Strong man quailed before the irate Peiper, and pleaded that as he had no money it was useless to attempt coercion, whereupon the Peiper " went for " his victim, smiting him full sore, and bringing suoh pressure to bear — upon his face — that ultimately the Strong man's wife, who was in the hotel, came to his relief with an order upon her solicitors for payment in full. The victor, flushed with his success, and being now in a softer mood, regaled hiß vanquished creditor with strong drink, and departed rejoicing, having apologised handsomely and chivalrously for the roughness he had been compelled to use. But the romance of the story was crushed out by the compulsory attendance of Mr Peiper at the .Resident Magistrate's Court yesterday. -In vain he pleaded Ihat he had made an apology, and that he gave his victim, who " was not very much knocked about," a glass of brandy. He had to learn that having taken the law into his own hands, he in turn had to " pay the piper," and that the payment amounted to exactly £3 6s 4d. The moral of which is, that in any similar case, a man may — if he has nerve enough— get his money by the sacrifice of a small per centage. A DastabdiiY Case. — A most extraordinary case was heard at the Resident Magistrate's Court yesterday, in which one at least of the men concerned must have been well acquainted with a Whitsuntide amusement of our forefathers, known as the lie-wage, wherein he who could tell the greatest lie carried off a whetstone as his reward. The story was tjn effect as follows : — A cabman had at Various' times had -some scurvy tricks played upon him, for the reason apparently that he had ventured to utter occasional remonstrances upon the language used by his fellows. One of his cushions had been stolen, his harness had been tampered with, and his wheels tied. Upon the last occasion, a cabman had in the morning threatened, in the usual figurative language, to do something hot for him that night. In the evening, while waiting near the Theatre, the complainant saw this man walking round his horse, and in the act of closing a pocket-knife. Having no apprehension of the committal of any serious act, he detected nothing wrong, but almost immediately afterwards lie got a fare, and on mounting to his seat found that the near rein had been deliberately cut through. The cab swerved, and but for the assistance that was at hand there must have been a serious accident. The fare .saved him-; self by jumping out. Complainant's state* ment was corroborated in several respects, but, on the part of the accused, another cabman — having been duly sworn — stated that he saw two boys deliberately cut the rein, and that he quietly looked on, and allowed them to go away without even attempting to interfere. He further stated that these two boys, whose dress and apparent age he knew, had been about the pavement the whole of the evening ; that one of them was giving a performance upon a jew's-harp, and that notwithstanding all this he certainly should not know them again if ho were to see them. He admitted that he did not say a word to complainant about tho occurrence, and that he and the accused permitted him to take a fare and to mount to his seat, in the face of the probability of an accident. We are glad to be enabled to state that the accused was fined £5 and costs, and that the Bnnch expressed their opinion in no measured terms of the dastardly conduct displayed by him and his witness, at the same time trusting that the licenses of the two men would be cancelled as speedily as possible. As the City Inspector was present, we have no doubt he will see that the recommendation of the Bench is acted upon, since men, who are capable of the committal of such an act,} or even of quietly permitting its perpetration, are utterly unfit to be entrusted with licenses from tho City Council. Subsequently tho cabman who was fined stated to sovoral persons that his witness was tho man who actually committed tho offence, arid that -prior to the hearing of the case he agreed to pay fche fine if one should be inflicted. It has not yet been determined whother the police authori- J tics will proceed further in tie matter.

Rbobuitiito ik Engxakd. — Beoruitinr goes on in and around London at the rate of 1800 a day. Thb Cablb.— Colonel Glover, a eonteavporary states, haa been instrumental in eecurjng the keeping open of the Java lines afc night, bo that when communication is restored the Colonies will have the benefit of a dar and night cable service. Payment of Mbmbbrs ik Victoria.— - The Melbourne Argus says that in the Vioto. rian Assembly one or two other gentlemen have not drawn their allowances, but it is not! known whether or not their decision is final. In the Council 22 members are taking their j cheques, and six members hayo definitely resolved to have nothing more to do with ' payment of members, whether established by lawjor otherwise. - ' -■ L " ' - /~A Paiitbtti, Accident. — A singular. ao. feident occurred to Mr Lodder; l&sffigfr'W* fhe Auckland S.S. Company. He was orosfi* ing the stoke-hole of the Go-ahead while ex* amining the boiler of the vessel, and stepping on what he thought was "a pieoe of wood plunged his leg up to the knee into tho boiler, which was filled with scalding water. Mr Lodder was severely injured, and suffered intense agony. When the stocking was being taken off his foot the skin came away with it. Manawattt Gokstitubkot.— Mr . Walter Johnston has expressed his willingness^ to retire from the representation of Manayrattt, but at the request of his constituents has con* sented not to resign until aft*r the ensuing . session, when he will: proceed to England. Dr Buller, Mr A. F. flalcombe, and Mr Snelson (Mayor of Palmerston North) are • mentioned as probable candidates. The pay* ment of the latter's election expenses has been guaranteed by his supporters, who are very numerous. — Evening Sla/: Mistaken Sympathy,— A very : charming young bride, who recently left a town not 100 miles distant from Ballarat to take the honey* - moon trip, was observed (says the Star) at the railway station to possess one of the finest black eyes that ever charmed the heart of an Irishman. A lady friend, overflowing with sympathy, inquired tenderly whether the newly made benedict ("the brute") had ia* flioted the injury. "Brute !" echoed the bride, hysterically; and then came out the story that the heel of an old boot, thrown for luok, had struck her as she was tearfully gassing, from the carriage upon her father's home. r^AiiLiPOLi. — A telegram received by the mail says :— A part of the fleet commands ■Gallipoli, and three ironclads are kept/stationed at the Gulf of Ismid. These ironclads are kept watching the movements of the Russians, and their cannon could bo brought t» command the Plain of Kayak, through which the Russians would have to pass in case of an advance towards the fortifications. . Almost every day ammunition trains leaVa : for the fortifications at Gallipoli, and* there are 22,000 Turkish troops in the lines.! ln : the fortifications there .are upwards of IQO cannon, 50 of which are Krupp guns of heavy calibre. ; •' s ; : ; f Russian Espionagk.— We clip the follow, ing good story : from an exchange : — Mr Stanley, the English oonsul. at Odessa, has a fine house, fronting the harbour, on Which there is a broad balcony. He found himself constantly watchedby two men. .They dogged his steps, whenever, he went abroad, posted themselves so as to command a view of his door whenever he was at home, never relinquishing their watch" upon him. After about three weeks .of this it became monotonous. He got tired of it, and knowing them to be in the employ of the Government, went to the Governer-Geherarito complain of it.. That bflicial heard him and replied, "Well, if you wish me to tell the truth, I will explain it, and I hope you will not be .-: offended. It is a fact that you have been watched, and there have been very grave reasons for it, as we have been informed that every night when you come home, which, ia. sometimes very late, especially when you have been to your club, Mr Stanley, you take a dark lantern and go out on your balcony, arid there, by moving and flashing your light, make signals in the direction of the sea, whence wa fear an attack from the Turkish fleet." Mr Stanley laughed immoderately, to the vety great surprise of the Governor-General; arid ' when he could speak, said "Yes it is true that I go out on my balcony at night wifclra lantern, and I will explain to you why. Every.' English Consul abroad has instructions from the Home Office to take meteorological observ . vationa three tvjaeß each day for forwarding them to the Home Office. The last dailj 6b* : serration I make is when I go home at night. My thermometer hangs on the balcony, and as ' I am near-sighted, I have to hold the lantsrii up close to examine its indications." . ; HONBSTY 18 THE BEST POLICY.— -A Hstle bird informs us of an amusing incident whioh occurred in the Poverty Bay Club a few days since (says the local Merdld). Amongst its members is as jovial an old salt as ever sailed a craft. Now to make our etory understood, we must explain that everything in connection with. the Club is marked by a due regard to economy. ITor instance, when members retire to the dining room for dinner, the lights from the front room are either extinguished or. taken in to. light up the dining table, thus . leaving the Club room in darkness. It bo happened that the Captain, who is accus*. tomed to stowing away cargo, finished his dinner first on the e^enijig we refer to,, and retired to the darkened room to lounge on the sofa. He was in the act of reclining when ,a r smash occurred, and the skijpper dis l " covered that he had, "cdncertmaed". a_ crisp sort of hat. To - try and pyichv' out the dents before the owner arri red, was the first thought, and then to frame a suit* able apology for the unfortunate accident was the next. Then it occurred to him that ~ the better plan would be to throw the tatout of the window and say nothing about jtf.j. But just as this idea struck him the members! returned, so there was nothing for it, but to, lie; down on the hat, till the gentlemen retired for the evening. Several times', the captain was asked to join in a "rubber".; he' steadfastly refused, he remembered the hat.' At length closing time arrived, and when all had gone and no one seemed to be short of a hat, the skipper rose from his couch, and examined the "tile." • It resembled ~ an accordion in shape, and was the property of — — the captain himself. He heaved a sigh r : and in piloting his way home, was heard to murmur, "honesty is the best policy: Fre tried both." ; ; -

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LOCAL AND GENERAL., Star, Issue 3151, 15 May 1878

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LOCAL AND GENERAL. Star, Issue 3151, 15 May 1878

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