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THE LATE MB W. GUISE BRITTAN.

Another of the honoured foundera of the Province, one of its pioneer leaders, has passed away. Last year it wae our sorrowful task to announce the death of Mr Watia BnsselL Since then it has been oor pleasnza to chronicle the celebration of the twenty* fifth anniversary of tbe birth of the Provisos^ and to speak of the useful well-spent Uvea that had materially contributed to the proa* perity of the past quarter of a century. Aft the present time we regret to have to record that another of those lives has run its eourea. It will be a great grief to his many friends and early comrades to know thai Mr GuJeo Brittan died yesterday morning, after a protracted and painful illness. Mr Brittan waa a fellow passenger of Kr Watts Bussell, in the Sir George Seymour-— one of the famous "first four ships " — which arrived in Lyttelton on Dec 17, 1860. H* was already a man of mark among bis feUev pioneers— a position he owed to hisexperieoee of life, his talents, bis maturer age, ana official position. Many who looked up to him, and have never ceased to do so since, wul remember the impressive address be delivered to the travellers, his companions in th* voyage, after the vessel bad come to aa anchor in the port of Lyttelton. Those of his hearers who are his survivors wfll think of that moment as one of peculiar brightness in their lives, and, when they recall tbs> words in whioh he spoke of the duties of colonists, and of the virtues which together entitled their enterprise to be numbered amongst the things that are heroic, tiie general feeling will be tbat those will be fortune** whose subsequent lives bave been ac blsmeleU as tbat of him who uttered tbem.

As Chairman of the Council of Land Purohasers, Mr Brittan did good service to bis fellow colonists. He was their repieseulaUfs in their dealings with Mr Godley, the agent of the Canterbury Association. Having eeaeed to occupy an official position under that body, he continued to enjoy its confidence in abign degree. Aotive, vigilant, aad industrious m public aftairs, he occupied a leading position till the dissolution of the Association. Sines that event tbe stormy arena of polities seems to have had no charms for him. Aa Chief Commissioner, during many years, of Crown Lands, he has proved himself a useful, conscientious public servant, and has been highly respected, but, with the exception of one contested election (in 1853, we believe), be has never made any attempt to enter publio life.

Mr Brittan was one of the earnest of the Ohristohurch settlers, having crossed the Port Hills some time before the bulk of hie fellow pioneers who settled in Lyttelton. The older Krtion of the Clarendon Hotel waa erected him in those early days, and subeequeutly did service as tbe Provincial Council Chamber. Englefield and Lanedowne next successively knew bis enterprise. Here he exercised a wide-spreading hospitality, wbich will keep his name green amongst his many friends. An enthusiastic cricketer, he frequently assembled at his bouse the cricketers that oould be gathered together. He took every opportunity to foster the game, and did ao much for is tbat he may well be called tiie father of cricket in Canterbury. For she pact ten years he was in very bad health, to that his death was not unexpected. We understand tbat the funerall will leave Mr Brittan's late residence in Oaahel street, for Papanui, at 3 pjn. to-morrow.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18760719.2.15

Bibliographic details

THE LATE MB W. GUISE BRITTAN., Star, Issue 2595, 19 July 1876

Word Count
593

THE LATE MB W. GUISE BRITTAN. Star, Issue 2595, 19 July 1876

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