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■ rfrO —^B — ftHt^ FBIDAY, DEOEMBBB 81, 1875.

The Akaroa olection has resulted, as $ Mm^>3 would, ia tf-e return of Mr Montgomery by ft large majority, in,, the Jrat place;, . Mr Montgomery was the old member who had not done anything to forfeit the confidence (ft the 5 electors. On the contrafi^ bo had. fairly earned an .in.-, creased y "lßare ''""ot" the same. His character is beyond question, he is nbove_the reßch of temptation, and histftM% is^eqiial to his gWat in^ dustry in tbe public service. On the other hand; his opponent Was not a man who held views, in any essential points, different from those of Mr Montgomery. As the political opinions of |be, two candidates pretty well coincided in the main, ifc would havo been very strange if the electors of the Akaroa District had unseated their old mefib*lrl' tit Pilliet, fully aware of thiCtfiPuWf was reduced to the necessity of fighting tbe eleotion on personal grounds. The chief argumeats he used were abuse of the late Bo«i^|if and abuse of his opponent. Tbe one recoiled upon himBelfy and the other, in the face of Mr Montgomery's known character, fell absolutely harmless. Instead of proving the charges of extravagance which he brought Against the Board. Mr Pilliet

raised a storm against himself. Tbe late Chairman, and the friends of the Boarbl? including Mr Montgomery, showed most conclusively that Mr Pilliet did not understand what he was talking about. The Press newspaper 'went further. It drew the infereiice that Mr 'Pilliet had shown himself incapable of discharging bis duty as a member of tbe Provincial Oounoil, and that he therefore was totally unfit for the larger position of a Member of the House of Representatives. The Press was quite right, for a man who oannot I Understand Such simple figures as those of which Mr Pilliet failed to see 1 the meaning, is absolutely incapable of taking part in the deliberations of j Ihe , Assembly. He fought hard t to set Himself right in the eyes of the ! public by pointing to the great services : he bad rendered tho District, in his capacity as a Provincial Councillor. But in vain. In the first place, Mr Montgomery's services to the District were quite as numerous and far more substantial. In tho second, all the service in the world is not sufficient to compensate for the inability to understanf Opnji Jof $be simplest of public questions. Mr Pilliet tried to make the electors believe that it was hot his inability to understand figures, but his opponent's disingenuous manipulation of; them; -that furnished his enemies with their strongest arguments against him. Inthe face of Mr Montgomery 's proofs, the #ain reasoning of Mr Inglis and the newspaper above mentioned, tojsay nothing of the known character and ability of the disputants, this argument of Mr Pilliet's was simply childish, if it was not a great deal worse., Mr Pilliet deliberately chose his line; p p>pved a bad one.; He has onl| himself to blame. While it is obvious that whatever the line he might have adopted, Mr Pilliet's defeat was ,a certainty throughout, it is a pity thAt he did hot make a more oreditable fight. In that case, his rebound from the stone wall against whioh he has run his head would have added to his political reputation. In South Canterbury, Mr Stafford has been returned unopposed for Timaru. This is a matter of congratulation for the Province, for Mr Stafford is a man Who adds a grace to the House of Bepresentatives by his eloquence and high character, and guides its deliberations by his varied attainments, his industry, and political experience. Mr Wakefield, who has obtained the seat for Gladstone by the casting vote of , the Eeturning Officer, is a young politician who is making his first appearance in the arena. He is well- known as a journalist who displays a fair amount of political knowledge* a great amount of caustic humour, and whose style is generally s racy and agreeable. As a politician he is of course unknown. Prom the reports of his speeches, it is clear that he gives promise of one day developing ihto a good speaker and ready debater. He has, as the defeated candidate, Mr Hayburst, somewhat ruefully remarked, " the gift of the gab." Mr Wakefield comes of an eloquent, able family, We can only hope he will fulfil the promise of his beginning. There is a rumour abroad that one of those who voted for him will be proceeded against for personation. What foundation there is for this it is impossible to say. If the Timaru Herald is to be believed, thero is nothing more than a mere informality, which can do its editor no harm. For the Selwyn seat, Mr Fitzroy has beaten Mr Beeves by a majority of 14.

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Bibliographic details

■ rfrO—^B—ftHt^ FBIDAY, DEOEMBBB 81, 1875., Star, Issue 2426, 31 December 1875

Word Count
806

■ rfrO—^B—ftHt^ FBIDAY, DEOEMBBB 81, 1875. Star, Issue 2426, 31 December 1875

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