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THE MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS.

■"*" Chbistohubch. The annual election of councillors took place ye? terday, and passed off more quietly than any of its predecessors for many yeara past. From the exciting nature of the meeting at the Oddfellows' Hall, on Tuesday, it waß anticipated that the vicinity of the City Council Chambers would be very busy while the poll was being taken, but it was quite the reverse. Until the time of closing approached there was in fact little to show that anything more than usual was going on inside the corporation buildings. The ratepayers appeared desirous of losing as little time from . business as possible. And so quietly was the voting carried out, that an impression began to prevail, as the day advanced, that only a small number of votes would be recorded. This, however, proved incorrect, for the total placed to the credit of the candidate at the head of the poll is 128 more than last year, though it must be remembered that eight candidates were in the field then, aa compared with six yesterday. After four o'clock, a small crowd mustered in front of the Council Chambers, but the Returning Officer having announced that the ■ result of the election would not be declared till six o'clock, the public dispersed. A large portion of the assemblage adjourned to the Clarendon Hotel, where considerable amusement accrued from impromptu speeches and good humoured election badinage — the two principal figures in the comedy being an exmayor of portly presence, and a gentleman who was very closely connected with the numerous agitations respecting the Ferry road drain. Shortly before six o'clock, the City Council Chambers again became the rallying point, but at no time were there more than two hundred persons present. While waiting for the result of the poll to be declared, chaff was freely indulged in, but it was gratifying to observe that practical joking i was entirely eschewed. The action of the City Council with respect to the " flouring " formerly carried on at elections must be deemed the cause of this, and pleasurable remark on the chauge thus brought about was general. Good humour prevailed throughout the whole of the proceedings, and everything passed off in a satisfactory manner. . The poll was taken under the supervision of Mr E. B. Bishop, ex- Mayor, who had been appointed Returning Officer by his Honor the | Superintendent at the request of a number of citizens, who had reason to believe that the Mayor intended to adopt measures which would stop the election and bring matters to a dead lock if he was not temporarily deprived of his authority. Mr Bishop was assisted during the day by the Town Clerk and two poll clerks, and the voting was carried on as expeditiously as could be desired. About a quarter past six o'clook the Returning Officer emerged from the Corporation office and announced the result of the* poll to be as follows: — ' , J. Gapes ... ... ... 474 ■. O.T. Ick ... ... ... 405 A. I. Raphael ... ... 366 E. H. Banks 312 W.Schmidt ... ... 239 J. Lee ..; ... ... 21 The Returning Officer then declared Messrs Gapes, Ick, and Raphael to be duly elected members of the City Council. The announcement was received with loud cheers, and in response to a call from a ratepayer in the orowd, three hearty cheers were given for the Returning Officer., Councillor Gapes, who was received with loud cheers, mounted the railing at the foot of the flag-post, and said he felt highly flattered on that occasion. , (Hear, hear.) The result of the polling wai really more than he -I expected, but he could not say it was more than he deserved — (laughter) — after what he was put through at the meeting on Tuesday night. (Hear, hear.) He could assure them they gave him a great, deal of work on that occasion. (Laughter.) No doubt he had not pleased every one, but no man could expect to do that, (Hear, hear.) He had endeavoured to please. the majority and he was proud to say the result of the election satisfied him that he had done so. He explained his views fully at the meeting on Tuesday night, and on that occasion be gave the ratepayers the opportunity of judging whether he was capable of acting and answering straightforwardly, and it appeared to him they were satisfied that such was the case. (Cheers.) He did not know he had anything more to say except thafc he felt extremely obliged for the honour conferred upon him, and to repeat what he had said on a former occasion that he would pursue the same course in the Council, as he had hitherto — acting conscientiously in all matters, and to the beat of his opinion, for the good of the city at large. (Loud cheers.) He did not know that he had more to say than this. (Cries of "That'll do." "Come over and have a banquet.") He once again begged to thank . them for the honour they had done ' him. Councillor Ick, who was warmly received, said he had to thank the ratepayers for having returned him, and he was pleased to see that they had also elected one of his former colleagues. (Cheers.) He had worked with Councillor Gapes for some time on the Works committee, and he would be very glad to work with him again. He might also say that he would endeavour to work with anyone whom the ratepayers might deem fit to place in the Council. (Cheers.) During the past two years there had been over three hundred meetings of the Works Committee and Council, and he (Councillor Ick) had only been absent once, while Councillor Gapes had, he thought, been equally attentive. (Cheers) Such as bis (Councillor Ick's) conduct had been ia the past, so it would be in the future. He would endeavour to forward the interests of the ratepayers in every possible shape, and if anyone came to him for advice or assistance in his capacity of Councillor, he would always be happy to give it. (Loud cheers.) Mr Raphael was received with cheers. He said he had to return his sincere thanks for the honour done him in electing him a member of the City Council. (Cheers.) He was a new man in theße matters, but he hoped to work on the Works committee, or any other coinmitteee, to the best of his ability and to the satisfaction of the ratepayers. (Cheera.) He had to say that he protested ■ moat strongly against the action of the Mayor in hie endeavour to render the election null and void. (Cheers.) It was a studied inßulfc for the Mayor to say, as he had done, that ho would avoid acting as Returning Officer, and thus prevent tbe poll being taken. [Groans, and cries of " kick him out."] He had again to thank the ratepayers for the honour conferred upon him, and could only say that he would do his best during his term of office to justify them in electing him again when the tin;* came round. (Cheera.) He had nothing more

to say than that he would do hit best for the oifcy. (Cheers.) Mr Banks was alao well received. He said he had to thank' those who had voted in his favour that day. He had not to thank them for electing him, but he had to thank them and the whole of the candidates for the courtesy with which they had treated him. (Cheers.) He had no doubt but the ratepayers had voted conscientiously, and had put those whom they thought the beat men in. (Cheers.) He hoped they were the beat men, and that they would do their duty to the city at large. (Oheera.) At any time that the ratepayers came to him again, he would place his services at their disposal. (Cheers, and a voice : " We'll come for you when Hart goes out.") He would not have come forward on this occasion, but that he was told the election would not be contested, as only two of the oli members were coming forward again. He begged to thank the ratepayers again, and trusted they would find in the future that their confidence on this occasion had not been misplaced. (Cheers.) Mr Schmidt, who was received with cheers, said, he thanked them most heartily for voting for him and bringing him so far on the poll. (Cheers.) It was far more than he expected, as he knew he had not the slightest show against the old members. He was very glad to see the old members returned, for be believed they would do better than him. He was only a colt, as it - wore, and it would have taken some time to break him in to work. (Laughter and cheers.) In conclusion, he could only say, that if ever they wanted a man, he would willingly stand for another election in. their behalf. (Cheers.) Mr Lee, who was favourably received, said he hoped the ratepayers did not think for one moment that he contested the election with any hopes of being returned. (Cries of "No, no j" "We don't believe you did ;" laughter, and a voice, "Go on, Jack.") He repeated that he never expected to be returned, and he might say the election had not cost him a moment of time nor a shilling in money. (A voice : " I'll vouch for that," and laughter.) He came forward merely to test how he would be likely to stand at any future election. (A voice : " It's a bright look out for you," and laughter). By the result of the polling he felt it was quite useless in him to come forward at any future time. (A voice : " Don't say that," and laughter.) He would not therefore promise, as the other defeated candidates had. done, to- come forward again. (Laughter.) But when the ratepayers 4 had anything to discuss publicly j when it' was attempted to do anything against their interests —(laughter) ; — when there was anything* attempted against their interests, in short, when 'there was any jobbery on foot he would stir up the people against it. (Hear, hear, and laughter.) He sincerely thanked all those who had voted for him that day. (Cheers.) A vote of thanks to the Returning Officer then terminated the proceedings. Lytteltobt. The election of three members, to serve as Councillors, took place yesterday. The polling booth was at the Council Chambers, Mr H. N. Nalder acting as Returning Officer. The election excited but little interest during the day, and it was only close on four o'clock that any of the ratepayers assembled near the polling place. Shortly after 3 o'clock, some fun was caused by two spring carts being driven round the town, to bring up the constituents of two of the candidates. Even this, after a time, fell flat, although the drivers of the vehicles were liberally sprinkled with flour. No doubt the presence of the police, with a hint that any one seen throwing flour, would be heavily fined, cheoked the practice of former yeara. Afc 5 o'clock, Mr Nalder made the following official declaration: — W. Murray 154 A.Chalmers... ... ... 94 G. Buist 83 W. Holmes 74 He therefore declared Messrs Murray, Chalmers, and Buist duly elected. As soon as the statement that Mr Murray was at the head of the poll, a perfeot storm of cheers ensued, and some time elapsed before the other names could be heard. After order had been somewhat restored, Mr Murray stepped forward and said — Ratepayers, and fellow-burgesses, I thank you sincerely for the proud position you have this day placed me in, and you may rest assured that I will look after your interest whilst in' the Council. I cannot say more, than that I return you my most hearty thanks. (Cheers.) The Mayor then came forward. He said he had again to thank the electors for returning him as a Councillor. He was delighted they had returned his friend Mr Murray at the head of the poll. Mr Buist briefly addressed the electors, and returned thanks for the confidence reposed in in him. Mr W. Holmes next addressed the meeting. He said this waa the third time he had sought the honour of being a member of the Council, and although defeated again, he did not think he should give in, but come forward next year. He thanked those electors who had voted and those who had not, and trusted ho would have better luck next time. Mr G. Agar then came forward. He said that he felt proud of their returning Mr Murray. All he could say waa that if Mr Murray was called away to Wellington to take part in the Executive, he would be very happy to take his place in the Borough Council until he returns. (Loud laughter.) The firm they knew was Murray and Co.; he would be the Co. (Renewed laughter.) Mr Agar said, before he concluded, he wished to introduce to them the man who did not keep his word — the man, in fact, that did not make the gutter for him. The speaker, amid roars of laughter, held up a large cartoon repreaentiug the face and figure of the late chairman of works. Mr W. Murray again thanked the burgesaes ?or the proud position they had placed him in, and moved a vote of thanks to the Returning Officer, which was duly carried, and the meeting diaper. «d. Kaiapoi. The annual election of Councillors for this Borough, took placa yesterday at the Council Chamber, and wa3 conducted by the Mayor, who acted as Returning Officer. The candidates were — Meaars G. H. Blackwell, G. P. Milsom, A. M'Donaid, and J. Beswick. The three former being the retiring Councillors, and comparatively little interest was taken in the election, and the only amusement afforded during the day. was by several cartoons that had been posted in front of Middleton's Hotel. Shortly after four o'clock the Mayor declared the result of the poll aa follows : — M'Donald ... 77 Milaom ... ... ... 64 Blackwell, ... 62 Beswick ... ... ... 46

The three first were therefore declared duly elected. Messrs M'Donald, Milaom, and Blackwell, returned thanks to the ratepayers, a good many of whom were present to hear che declaration of the poll.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18740911.2.9

Bibliographic details

THE MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS., Star, Issue 2032, 11 September 1874

Word Count
2,373

THE MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS. Star, Issue 2032, 11 September 1874

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