Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

LOCAL AND GENERAL.

■ ■• ♦*■ The Footpaths.— Several letters have been addressed to tho Cifcy Council, calling attention to the necessity of improving the footpaths in various parts of the cifcy, bufc in the absence of sufficient funds tho Council reluctantly finds itself unable to comply with the Various . requests with that degree of expedition they should desire. If the prayer of the petition to the ProvincialCounqil be acceded to, the streets and footpaths of the city will bo improved wifch the least possible delay. Timabu and Temuka Railway.— The Timaru Herald, of June 15, says :— The locomotive for this railway was got into working order last weok. On Friday ifc was drawn along the lino nearly to tho Washdyke by horses, and will bo set to work as Boon as tho tho trucks are ready, which aro now being put together on the beach. We observe with satisfaction that Bteps are being taken to strengthen tho railway bridges on the northern boundary of the lino, an extra row of piles and struts being placed along the seaward side •f them. Immigbants peb Snip Nobthampton. — The Chief Immigration Officer reports that the general Btate of tho health of tho immigrants is satisfactory, and supplies the following list of cases in hospital :— Mrs J. Mears, 2G, doing well ; Edward Jeffoy, 40, convalescent ; Emma Everitfc, 5, doing well ; Lilly Everitt, 2, do ; Mrs E. Laity, 18, do ; Walter Gaiger, 27, do ; James Atkins, 26, do ; Miss E. Rudd, 18, do ; Mrs Emma Gowen, 25, do ; E. Brewer, 27, do ; E. Atkins, 23, progressing favourably ; M. A. Symmonds, 22, doing well; Baldwin, 30, do ;E. J. Harvey, 1, do. One death is reported, that of James Berry, on June 13, of diarrhoea. Railway Tabiff. — A deputation from tho Canterbury Chamber of Commerce, consisting of the Chairman (Mr Dymock), Messrs Lane and Nathan, waited upon hiß Honor the Superintendent and fcho Executive yesterday morning with reference to tho reduction of the existing railway tariff, aud laid before tho Government the request of the Chamber thafc the proposed reduction in chargeß should be of a more substantial character. Tho subject was fully represented and discussed, and tho Government informed the deputation thafc fcho proposed reductions were only tentative, ond that further reductions would be made if the revenue justified them. CitßisTCHUßcn Haemonic Society. — A meeting of the committee was held yesterday evening. Present — Messrs Knox (in chair), Jameson, Feldwick, Stephen, Davis, and Inwood (hon. see.) The principal business was to complete the arrangements for tho concorfc on Friday week ; among othor matters, it was decided to have books of fcho words of tho " Lay of tho Bell," and of tho pieces in fcho miscellaneous part of tho concert printed. After some discussion, it was decided that Handel's " Samson " should bo the next work taken up bytho society. Four new gentlemen and two new lady members were elected, and after the transaction of somo other routine business, the meeting terminated. _...,.

Good Tejiplabs. — Tho first of an intended series of temperance gatherings in connection withSt Andrew's Loclgo of Good Templars took • place in Sfc Andrew's Schoolroom last evening. Notwithstanding the unpleasant nature of fche weather thero was a large audience, which . included several ladies. Tho Rev C. Fraser presided, and addresses "wero delivered by the Rev B. J. Westbrook, Messrs E. Connal and Exall. Several pieces of vocnl music wore very pleasingly rendered during the evening by the lady members of Sb Andrew's choir, assisted by Mr and Mrs Long. Votes of thanka having been passed to those who had contributed to the evening's entertainment, the proceedings were brought to a close in the usual way. Scholarships.— The report of the examination for scholarships, conducted by the Rev W. J. Habens and Mr J. 0. Veel, wasreadattho meeting of the Board of Education yesterday afternoon. There were ten provincial scholarships, and two given by Mr Geo. Gould, tho total number of candidates being seventy-five. Acting upon the report of fche examiners, fche scholarships wero awarded by fche Board as follows : — Class A, under 11 years of ago, two provincial scholarships, B. Cohen, Lincoln Road School, 421 marks - J. P. Grossman, Kaiapoi School, 419 marks J. T. Partridge, Christ's College, being only threo marks behind Grossman, the Board decided to givo him a special prize, mosfc probably in the form of books. Class B, under 12 years, three provincial scholarships, F. Wake, Kaiapoi School, 364 marks ; G. W. Rogers, Melville House (Mr Cook's) School, 334 marks ; David Nairn, Lincoln Road School. 322 marks. Class C, under 13 years of age, three provincial scholarships : A. G. Atack, Melville House (Mr Cook's) School, 865 marks ; J. H. Deamor, Christ',s College, 335 marks ; W. Sword, Riccarton School,. 317 marks. Mr Gould's two scholarships : J. F. Harfcland, Christ's College, 311 marks ; W. J. Alexander, Lower Heathcote School, 285 marks. Class D, under 14 years of age, two provincial scholarshios : A. R. Barclay, Christ's College, 377 marks ; J. Inneß, Melville House (Mr Cook's) School, 344 marks. The examiners' detailed report will bo found in another column.

Accommodation pob Immigeants. — The Auckland Provincial Government have reauested tenders for the construction of twentyfive immigrants' cottages. These cottages are required to bo built of wood, with corrugated iron ' roofs, and to contain each four rooms. They are to bo so constructed that they can bo taken to pieces and removed to any part of the province for temporary use. A Maobi Feast.— Northern exchanges give the following particulars of tho bill of fare furnished for the entertainment; of the Maoris during their great meeting at Kaiwaiki, near Wanganui ; -Slaughtered pigs, 100 j potatoes, 2000 baskets; kumaras, 20(> baskets ; flour, 8 tons ; sugar, 3 tons. Besides there was a very large number of live pigs (about 200) and a considerable quantity of karaka berrieß, smoked kumaras, eels, fish, tobacco, rum, and 46 huge calabashes of preserved pigeons and fcuis. Amusing Contbetemps. — Of fche now opera "La Juivo" afc fcho Melbourne Opera House, the correspondent of fche Hamilton Spectator says :— " In one scene, Dondi, as fche Cardinal, and Mr Kitts, as the Emperor, enter on real : horses. The first night it was performed, Mr Kitts was bucked off, and the great Cardinal ignominiously saved himself by holding tight with both arms round the horse's neck. I know of several who wenfc to see 'La Juive' after this, not. bo much for the sake of the opera, bufc in fcho hope fchafc fche same feat of horsemanship would be repeated." A Nice Kind of Doa Law. — Accordmg to the Auckland law the, owner of any premises is liable for any unregistered dog found upon them, whether his own or not. One energetic member of the police force turns this provision of tho law to effect in fche following manner : — Sauntering easily along fche streets he perceives a collarless dog basking in tho sunshine heedless of municipal police ordinances and cifcy by-laws. The constable walks stealthily up aud applies his foofc to tho animal's hinder parts, and watohes the effect. Naturally enough the terrified bruto bolts on to the noarcsfc premises, and then fortified by the extraordinary provisions of the Acfc which makes fche person on whose premises a dog may bo seen responsible for its existence, fche constable forthwith lays an information, and obtains a conviction with costs. The Native Quail. — Afc fcho last meeting of the Otago Institute afc the rapid dispppearance of tho native quail within the last ten years was alluded to. Mr Bathgate said an old settler had informed him that fcho groundlark had increased in this province Bince settlement — especially so in clearings. The extinction of quail had been attributed to burning tho grass, but that could nofc account for their total disappearance as thoy disappeared where tho grass had nofc been burnt. Tho chairman said quail wero so plentiful eighteen years ago in tho province thafc one could not ride five yards without the quail rising up before tho horse, but now wherever ho had lately travelled in tho interior ho noticed thafc fchey had totally disappeared. Gheatiiead's Remedy foe Diptheeia. — We have been requested (says the Thame* Evening Star, of Monday week) by Mr Lowndes, of tho cuttor Galatea, to state that ho has effected a most perfect cure of diptheria in one of his children by the use of Greafchead's Australian remedy. Two of Mr Lowndes' children were ill from diptheria and under ordinary medical treatment last week. On Saturday night a third child was taken ill, and Mr Lowndes procured fid worth of sulphuric acid. He administered threo drops in a wine-glassf ul bf water, and instant relief was experienced by fcho child. A second dose was given yesterday ; tho cure was completed, and the patient is now running about as well as ever. The two children first smitten, Mr Lowndes says, cost him some pounds for doctoring ; the cure of the last ono has been effected for almost nothing. Salaries in the Victoeian Telegbaph Department. — Tho Melbourne Argus, of May 15, says : — Tho statements made recently affecting the management of tho Telegraph department, ond more particularly tho salaries paid to competent operators, have apparently nofc been lost upon the Government, for on Thursday evening an official list was posted in the operating-room of a projected increase ot" salaries. We have not seen the document, bufc understand that tho concession is not of a very significant character, tho principal feature being the promise of a small bonus for excellence in operating. We understand that there has been formally affiliated upon «ho Telegraph department a fomale branch of the servico, under the superintendence of a lady, who receives a salary of £220 per annum. She has under her four female telegraphists, and they have fche full management; and control of the suburban lines.

Baemaids. — It is currently reported (says the Otago Daily Times) that when tho General Assembly meets a bill will ho introduced for the purposo of amending the laws relative to the public-houses, so thafc in ifc thero will be a provision for the abolition of barmaids. Emigbation. — Tho New York Tribune says: — Au English writer argues that .the available incomes of his countrymen are increasing, and, :is a proof, mentions thafc tho ordinary household service provision of the country is. insufficient. In 1831, one-thirteenth of the women and girls of England wore servants ; in 1871 . the. proportion was only one-ninth, which might be considered an evidence fchafc fche number of people who could afford domestic assistance -has largely increased, Bufc those ingenious statements need some qualification. Beside them should be placed fche emigration figures of the poorer classes, and tho whole number of paupers in Great Britain. This done, the wealth "of the country would probably not Beem so largo. The Auckland Island Settlement.—: The Otago Guardian of. Juno 11 says : — At last something has been done towards attempting the formation of a settlement '■■ on the Auckland Isles. Dr Monckton's Bcheme is no longer a matter of possibility or probability, but a mattor of fact. A beautiful schooner, named fche Mabel Jane, the property of the originator of the project, has been fitted up for the purpose, and started for her destination in charge of Captain Welch, a navigator of well-known reputation and Bkill. Sho carries a number of station hands, including ono married couple, likewise a young bull and a selection of heifers, a thousand foot of timbers, and a largo assortment of stores, tools, and implements. The vessel has been fitted out in tho most complete manner, aud carries, besides her own boat, two kauri-built copper-fastened boats, which will remain at the settlement. If the weather proves favourable, sho will probably bo kept running between the Aucklands and Riverton, for many months to come, for fcho conveyance of stock and stores. It is thought thafc a portion of fcho outlay will bo covered by profits accruing from fcho seals wifch which those islands fairly teem. We certainly hope fchafc this may be the caße, for the sake of fcho settlement itself and for thafc of its projector, Dr Monckton. This gentleman has, we understand, commenced his arrangements for establishing a pigeon-post, and had procured a number of 3 oung earner pigeons. Theso unfortunately died, bufc ;the doctor has sent for a fresh supply. The Mabel Jane sailed for fche Auckland Islands a few days ago. Remuneeation of Telegbaph Opebatoes. — The following remarks, made hi a late number of the Argus, apply with equal force fco the telegraph clerks of New Zealand : — "Wo have young married men in the department of three or four-and-twenty, receiving 30s per week only, and from present appearances they will be grandfathers before they reach the maximum of £180. .... Now, it appears to us thafc a telegraph operator is about on an equality wifch a shorthand writer. In order to attain perfection in either line of business, a long apprenticeship and considerable natural aptitude are indispensable. Every ono will admit that they are both skilled workmen, very far removed from those whoße duties are merely clerical — duties in which proficiency is attained m ifchoufc any lengthened practice. Why, thon, should fche prizes within fche reach of each bo so very dissimilar ? : We know that a sum of £1500 ib, yearly distributed between the three gentlemen who report for Mansard, and we do nofc think thafc fchey are paid ono penny too much for their services. Thoy have spent many years in acquiring a complete knowlenge of their profession, and ifc is only right that they should bo remunerated liberally for fche experience and skill fchey place afc fcho disposal of the State. Bufc whilo we consider them only treated wifch justice, we certainly aay thafc the operators who havo also spent years in acquiring fchafc practical dexterity which enables them to transmit a speech like that recently delivered by Sir Jameß M'Culloch, afc Warranambool, with correctness and despatch, aro miserably underpaid. The telegraphic service is one of great importance to the community ; but its value depends entirely on regularity, speed, and accuracy. In order to secure these three desiderata, wo musfc have competent operators, and these we shall never retain as long as we adhere to the present niggardly system of treatment." Railway Abbangements on the San Fbancisco Mail Route. — Tho New Zealand Herald of May 26, says : The arrival of this month's mail is as close on table-time as we can well expect from branch boats. Due on Saturday, tho boat arrived off tho entrance on Sunday night, and came alongside the wharf at daylight yesterday morning. Ifc is satisfactory to learn from our exchanges that the management of the lino are endeavouring to make' the route v popular one, by affording not only despatches across the continent, but at tho same time ensui'ing tho comfort of the passengers. A San Francisco paper reports that the manager of the line (Mr Hall) had been endeavouring to have established a mail and passenger train specially in connection with the mail beats, and that he had every reason to believe that he would be able to accomplish this deßirablo end. Tho companies, it is said, promised to afford every convenience •possible to passengers, and all the facilities in thoir power for tho speedy transmission of mails across the continent, and the first step in this direction was taken on the arrival of tho steamship Tartar. An hour after the arrival of that steamer v passenger train was on its way across country with tho mails and as many passengers as desired lo go. Two days after tho remainder of tho passengers arranged to leave. Quoting from the report, we learn that " thoy are provided wifch two palace cars exclusively for their own use, no othor passengers being admitted to them. The next day another party loft, and they were similarly accommodated. They go by tho quickest route to New York, and during tho journey fchey will have all the comforts of a first-class hotel. The passengers are highly pleased with their treatment, but when thoy reach New York they will have still more reason to be pleased with their trip. The palace cars at their disposal are luxuriously finished and furnished, and more resemble drawingrooms in hotels than apartments in railroad cars. Some of the passengers still remain in the city. They intend to take their own way and time of reaching the other side. They. contemplate visiting Yosemite, tho Geysers, and some of fcho other wonders unequalled in the world which are to be found in this State, and within short distance, comparatively, of the city." A littlo attention such as above recorded will be tho means of making this route the greatest favourite with all travellers to and from tho colonies. The difficulty will bo to provide sufficient accommodation " aboard Bhip " for fchem.

Native Land Ownbbs. — Including the small remnant , of . tho Ngatimainoo Natives that still survive, wifch fcho tribe of which Taiaroa (M.H.R.) appears to bo recognised head, we find, says a contemporary, that tho Ngaitahu tribe — the total population of which moßt probably does nofc exceed 1400 souls — in Westland, Canterbury, Otago, Stewart's Island, and Ruapuko, own 42,250 acres of land, averaging about 30 acres per man, woman, and child ; and fchafc they havo received in pay ment for the lands they havo sold at different times — excluding the Princess street Reserve, Dunedin — tlie sum of £17,000. . . _ . .. An Eagle Attempting to. gabby off a Gibl. — An Alabama paper Bays* — On Satur-day,-February 3, a girl named Elizabeth" Moore, daughter of Albert Moore, living in the north east corner of Cleburne country, Alabama, was returning home from a neigh- ■" hour's house, whither she had been sent on an errand, when sho felfc something heavy strike upon" her shoulders, and* the noxt; instanti) sho was borne tp tho ground. . She gays that her firsfc impression was thafc she had been seized by a panther or somo othor wild beast, j bufc soon felfc the talons of what proved to be I an eagle clutching her Bides and arms, lacerating fche flesh in a fearful manner, and wifch its beak pecking her on the head, she was carried some distance on the ground. Pretty soon the eagle, having secured his prize, with claws and bill firmly fixed, raised her from the ground and sailed along at from three to four feet above fche earth for somo distance. Occasionally she was dropped an the ground, but fche eagle would as often raise her again, making new and serious wounds with his talons in her body, and his beak in her head, till at last he reached the height of ton feefc, and attempted to light on tho limb of a red oak treo on the roadside, when his hold again gave way, aud tho girl fell to fche earth seriously stunned and hurt. Sho was unconscious for a time, clambered over the fence near by into her father's orchard, and began making. the best of her way to tho house, near which she was met by her mother, who had been attracted by her screams and was hastening to her relief. The most remarkable part; of the matter is fchafc the girl did not see tho eagle afc all. A shawl which had been securely fastened about her head, so as to project over her. face, hid her rude ; antagonist from her view. Tho track along which she was dragged, however, was plainly visible in the road. The girl Elizabeth, is fourteen years of age, and weighs between eighty and ninety pounds. The eagle has beon twice Been by tho hunters, who are making every effort to kill or to capture him.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18740616.2.7

Bibliographic details

LOCAL AND GENERAL., Star, Issue 1959, 16 June 1874

Word Count
3,276

LOCAL AND GENERAL. Star, Issue 1959, 16 June 1874

Working