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MAGISTERIAL.

CHRISTCHURCH. (Before C. C. Bowen, Esq., R.M.) Labceny of a Swag. — Richard Sydney Williams, an old offender, was brought up on a charge of this nature. The evidence Went to show that a man named Geo. Barker, recently arrived in the province, left his swag at Barretfc'sjHotel on Wednesday afternoon lasfc, I and that the prisoner took the swag, away in the evening. When arrested by Detective | Feast, ho was wearing a jacket, shirt, and trousers, which Barker had left in the swag, and, on enquiry, ifc was found that he had disposed of a shirt and flannel to a man named Simpson, a baker on the Lincoln road ; a pair of boots to a man named Ashworth, butoher, Lincoln road, and fchat he had left some other articles ,afc the Halswell quarry. Barker valued his . swag and its contents at about £5, and said prisoner had no authority to take them.; in-f aot, prosecutor had not Been him until he was" arrested. Prisoner, in defence, made a statement about having lost a Bwag, but his Worship said that was no justification for him taking one which he knew very well was not his own, and he would bo sentenced to six months' imprisonment with hard labour. Fobpeitube of Bail. — Edward Hiorns appeared in answer to a summons calling upon him to show cause why his bail in the case of the Queen v. Richard Bryant, for beinp illegally on premises, should not be estrea cd. Hiß Worship said fchafc Mr Hiorns and Bryant had given bail in fche amount of £10 each for the appearance of Bryant — who had been arrested for being illegally on premises — on the' 10th inst., and Bryant had neglected to appear, consequently, the bail in the case was liable to forfeiture. Mr Hiorns said he did not know Bryant intimately, and had gone bail for him merely out of kindness. Ho believed Bryant to be a sawyer, and he had used every means to find him. He had telegraphed fco Akaroa and elsewhere but without avail. He believed, however, that Bryant, being a sawyer, was somewhere in the Bays His Worship said there had been so many cases of this kind lately that he must estreat

the bail on this occasion. He would, however, ' only call upon Mr Hiorns to pay £5. Mr Hiorns asked if he could take out a warrant against Bryant. His Worship said there was still a notice out for Bryant to appear and show cause why his bail should not be estreated, and efforts would be made to find him hy the police. Of course, Mr Hiorns, having suffered by Bryant's neglect to appear at the court, could proceed against him in the usual way. His Worship then instructed the police to telegraph to the police at Akaroa to hunt Bryant out.

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MAGISTERIAL. Star, Issue 1864, 21 February 1874

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