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Local and General.

"' 'Mischievous Dogs. — Hagloy Park, has evidently: ;bee^ ,tho resort of a numbor of uiieohierous, r dogs during the past few 'jaja,. ilr K. Wilkih, -who rents a. portion of 'nh'e'Pftfk,' ha^ had a' dumber of sheep -worried, iind dffers a liberal raward for information .leading jfcq- a discovery! of the. owners of the •logs. The Domain Board also purpose issuing notices to the effect that all dogs taken through the Park must in future bo lea.]

Heathcote Disteict. —Mr William Montgomery has consented to come forward as a candidate to represent this district in the Provincial Council, in the room of; Mr A. Duncan, resigned. ■„.'■ Ltttelton Borough Council.-— A numerously signed requisition has been presented to his Worship the Mayor, asking him to call a public meeting of the ratepayers for the purpose of hearing the opinions of the Various candidates nominated for seats in the Council. The Late Flood is the South."— The Timaru Herald of Sept. 3, says :— " We are sorry to learn that the late flood washed 'away several portions of the railway line on the Washdyke flat, amounting in all to about five chains." ' St Alban's Public Libeaey. — A meeting of the committee was held on Tuesday evening, when all the members were present except Mr Walton, Mr F. J. Garrick in the chair. A letter wag read from the Government, stating that £206 for building op fittings, and £50 for books, had been granted to the district, the formeramount to be subject to the district contributing an equal amount. A lengthy djscussiori' ensued with respect to what should be done for the purpose of taking advantage of the Government offer. -Ultimately, it wasdecided to refer the whole matter to. a public J meeting,and the committee then adjourned. Stealing- Shrubs. — It appears that the usual spring depredations in plants and shrubs are commencing in some quarters of the city and suburbs. A greenhouse, in the west of the town, was broken into the other night, by some one who must have known the way," and who carried off a carefully selected cutting of a white Camellia, along with other les3" notable appropriations. Gratitude - perhaps ought to have imposed silence on the owner in this case, seeing that the . thief , though ho spoiled the plant, did not take it off bodily. But were those who are robbed from time to time to make known tho kind of article stolen, thVpr'acfcTce would tosome extent be checke'dy and at least the boastings of the pilferers would be changed into anxiety' to hide their ill-gotten goods. Good TEarPLAita.— - A public meeting was held in tho Riccartou schoolroom last night for. the purpose of hearing an explanation ..of the principles upon which the Order of Good Templars is established. There was a large attendance, amongst which we're several ladies. Mr Clarkson was voted to the chair,' arid expressed his pleasure that efforts were being made to establish a lodge of Good Templars in the district. S.DJt.W.G.T. Caygill then addressed the meeting warmly advocating the advantages of total- abstinence, which, ho said, must benefit every community, and, consequently, the nation. G.D.R.W.G.T. Andrews next gave a resume- of the ' principles upon which the Order ia- established, and spoke strongly in Buppojb of tihe benefits to-be derived from becoming members of the Order. A vote of thanks to the Chairman thentermi,:nated the proceedings: A form of. application -for the, establishment' of. a lodge at Riccarton< was afterwards signed; by several* of those present. St. Albans Mutual latPEOYEMENT Asso>giation. — An entertainment in aid df the funds of the association wa& hold in thie reading-room last evening. There was a. 'crowded attendance; and Mr C R, -Blakiston ! occupied the chair. The following programme was carried out in a satisfactory '■ manner: — Reading, . tt The gridiron," Mr i Gordon ; song, " The slave; chase," Mjr : Simpson; readings " Talkin* Latin," Mr I White; duet, " MYs > well," Messrs Scrini-. .Shaw and Searle ; recitation, "The knightfs toast," Mr Simpson..; . song, {C Forget not to remember," Mr Scrimshaw;; recitation, " Mind your ow&n business," Mr- Simpsonf; ; recitation, " The old maid," Mr- Simpson! i-. recitation, " The: execution,"' Mr 'Inglesori .y song, " The greeagrocer," Mi; Briggs ; reqitalsion, " The Eaven," Mr- Mantj son^g,. " Isabella," Mr'Tngleson ; rerifcatk>n,:"'<{sbargeof the light brigade',"- M»- '.Briggs^ ; song,. iiJßelle.Jßrando2v" Mr_Scrimshaw_s .recitation,. "The field of Waterloo,'* Mr j "duet,, f Ijafbpard watbih," Messrs) Soriiri&liaYr \and* Searle. The- entertain'meiit c*oacluded' by performers and audience; singing .-5 "tuej "*![»* tional Anthom. ' 'i. ', ! " V '■'■> "'-"' JEast : Oh3J«tohurch' School iCdxMiiTßa; A'meetirigof the committee>ntas<!b.eld a^.4 1 p.m. on Tuesday: v Piesent^— The- -Be-VB-. H. G;-M. Watßon, W. J...Haben6^ (hon. sec^jMessrs Pratt, Thomas.Cuff, Dymock, Waltpn, and Mskopherson,. Mr Williams being absent in :^elljngt6riVM'r-;W. Pratt vfas voted to the chair. The minutes- of the previous meeting were jsead and coQfirmed. ' Mr . Habe'ns irep'ortad that, in accordance with, instructions ,'at'tiio previous meeting, he had conveyed. the tnaaiks of the committee to the 'chairman of St. John's school committee for tie use- of the room for thebt meetings ; that he had adfer.tised for laiid | that' he had written to.askjfor lblae;:tempojfftry use of , St., Andrew's girk' schoolroom^ but .had : not received the Rev. C. ,Fj»sor's . reply ; that he had received £50 from the Board of Education for current; expenses ; and that he had engaged Mi' Buck as enumerator. He submitted a copy of the directions given to Mr Buck. A latter was read ' from .the Board of Edjicaition, , expressing ; a hope that the; cosa"mittee would make further endeiyou* to obtain temporary accommodation for "¥c|iopf purposes a& soon as possible. Mr Watson moved — " That . Messrg IJymock, Habeaajand tlie morer be appointed, as a sub-coxomjttee to make a'peraonal canvass for : buildings! for. school purposes for the district, and that khey report to the committee at its next meet-: ing." Mr Mac pliers on seconded the motion, which was unanimously agreed to. The subject of religious instruction waa discussed. Mr Habens moved—" That the West Christ-' church committee be invited to confer with this committee with a view to ascertaining what regulations shall prevail in. Christchurch with regard to religious teaching." Mr, Cuff seconded tho motion, which waß carried. Op the motion of Mr Habens, seconded by. Mr Thomaß, leave of absence was granted to Mr Wynn Williams. The committee then adjourned,

Philosophical Institute. — Thte' usual monthly meeting of members was held at the Literary Institute last evening. Present : Messrs Inglis in the chahy Carriithers, Wright, Fereday, Maskell, Wakefield, Dr Haast, Rev. C. Fraser, Rev. 3T,- < W. Stack, Dr Turnbull, Dr Coward. Mr v -D.S. Montague was elected a new member. .Dr Haast read a paper entitled " Memoir on Harpagornis, part 11., containing a description of pelvis of Harpagornis Mqorii and assiniilis." The paper was illustrated by several plates and speci■menscollected Wy Dr Haast. G-aol Returns'— The following was the state of Her Majesty's gaols in this province, for the month ending Aug. 31 : — Lyttelton — Males, for trial at Supreme Court, 8; hard labour, 79; imprisonment, 6 ; debtors, 4; total, 97. Discharges, 21. Christchurch — males, hard labour, 25 ; imprisonment, 2 ; total 27. : Females; hard labour, 22; imprisonment, .1, ;.. total 23. . Discharges — males, 15; females', ■ s 'j total -20. Timaru— Males, hard labour, 9 ; imprisonment, 1 ; total 10. Females^ total"; 10.-',- >\ Discharges — njales/" 2 ; total 2. u. '"y' r -l /-.: : , "-■-• *Z. ..' ; Killinohy « Chueoh.-^ The >cerembny-,i)f laying the foundation stone of St. Patrick's Churcn;lEilliHcliy, 'and of 7 cpn9ftcrati|ig the churchyard, . was performed by the Right Kov the Primate, assisted By .the Rev J : . K. Willmer, Deacon r Curate, of the district, oil Tuesday, the, 2nd inst. The weather was somewhat threatening, a sharp shower fell during; the- service-, m the schoolroom, consequently his Lordship very considerately dcUvercd'his charge 'tos the congregation- in the schoolroom, instead df waiting until they arrived on the ground. Evening prayers having been-read in-, the schoolroom by tke; Rev J. X; Willmer,- his Lordship delivered a; short -and most- impressive charge lo those ! assembled, at the' conclusion of which the; congregation walked in procession to the site of the new church, headed by the choir sing-j ing" th~e "385th"~hyrtm~ -"• On ward a— Christians March." On arriving at the site, a bottle! containing, copies .of Vhe'Li/tteltfm^ Times and .Press, together with -an appropriate inscription, was deposited, in the^appointeßr placei His Lordship .then having read'; *h£ »P/ecial service , appointee!, .' f or the IcereOTph^gproceeded to lay the corner stone of tbo*;:phurchj after' which the ceremony of consecratirig the churciiyai'd '" was performed; and- the- 'service concluded. A collection amounting >te"£3 53 4d in aid of the building fund 1 of • the ohureh was made on the ground. ' i TnR Beijwje oyeb the TNOA-wir, — A ; correspondent of the Timaru Herald thu9 S writes, under date September Ist : — ■" Tho ! traffic of the Foinfc district has been crossing the "river Tngawai during the last* • tfeek- at very considerable risk, and the district ie : increasing so • fast that such traffic is- now l almost .continuous throughout the day. On Saturday ; evening ..my waggon, returning from Timara r .f6und the river bo high frliafc it) had to be leiSr in the middle of the &fcream\ the two men who were in it. coming out. on their* horses. On Sunday' -morning,- aa- the river was still' rising, and there was danger of the waggon" being washed awoy> we •ndeavoureH to make fast a rope to the end of the pole, intending to "■ pull it oufewith : the plough v horsey, which> were waiting in the ahallpvp-* water,'J ",, ?^V)au3t .^making the irope ; . ; fast; ..it;. it; ' , got I . '.entangVed ' found' thetfbre leg o£ 5 a" hgyse^ which. , pn&^ of > the,taen was ridiDgi.and'of 'cou'rse'jit 1 plunged: an ji ■fell, i,n dpep. wafeer repeatecUyj 'Axltimatoly the i'man (Hughie^, , waaj swept! r a^ay ( dow-n. fclie r iiyer, after b^im'fche.lhors^ and' about a. oha^i. Jbehind came the- wa^g^n,', uj>Bid f e'!dpwre-; : they .all wpn.t,dowi^4n£e |^ ) fcra^^\for, nejirly r ,half |» mile, and' landed)' on 'a /shallow, •<;»«■ main; ia^ive.jl.ajn, yery^ g}<s ,t6 .bufe tttehorse, 4ead, ; :th«; , riaggoti reduced. to> a 'board' upon VtioelaV ' ; Tor|iinateJj- the- ma^, 'Hiighie wa& y a^vssr^f powerful maw,_or 1* : would nofc'^aTOjgQfc'owt/sd.'.well. ?"If Jiesita iB ;to say hoV. iong-.tnjf;. Boaffl of JWltks. ha re had f un'ds foi-tliifr bVidge, "whie'h*at''ttiie- me at lis only some tenvclvains, , in length,, but it |is certain that ho ! surTeybr or asssbtanfe sjjjr■veyor hiid^ beon -near the place, Vjuflgihg Jfedm the minutes of f.heir : ,.' T>he BoaVd seem to have> entirely, forgotten .t'iOf.'ijes-yonsi-bility whieh> rests on it." <'j ''■ ■'; ; SnocKiira: Death.— An inqujest was held ■on Safcui'day lastafe the Tekapo 3erry Accommodation iibuse, by Melville Gh»y,E3q., J.P., and an. ordinary jury, on the body of James Crawford,, which was found vet, the Tasnjan river-bed on the 23rd ult. 'Un& folio winfi; is the evidence.of the; principal, witness : — John,: Rainbow Stansoll, publican, I^nrke'a Jass, \^b6> deposed 'thb body-as' tliat of Jatoos Crawforcl';" ' first 1 saw dfead Ibody on tbe 1 23rd mat ; he was lyihlg witfirn a f^'yard^ of. the 'Taaniari' river, flat 6ni',nls b'^idk on ,4h'e Bhinglei with the head v i'n.^b.e''xlaturat posiiiqn, with three shirts7r6n, no- other clothing, and 1 covered with a blanket. There were no, marks on 1 the J^ody except .thafdiscoloutjd marka on the thighs. There was no evidence of wateE having been over him-.. Twoiild ha.?e known j£,w^ter had .washed over him. : H^s^ legs' a'p,peared clean as . if ho had waited through' water before. I saw none of hip ,clothea ■ besides those mentioned, now on him. I am not aware, that anyoae was •present- at his death. He Tscas— staying at my house before his death. He left thea^ on: Satrurdsy, 9th' * ult. .He hadi been ,therej between a fortrightand three weeks. He .was in apnareutjgpod health then. ,- He bad been drinking, ' ifaaS.'neTarf incapable. IHe ahpw.ed ao, signs then oJE- ; suffer jug, f^omj the effects of ; drink.- His posßessionsr .we^e: a'; bay hprser— lately /^ belonging;/ to^ : Sims, shepherd— psaddle ' and. bridle* and, a, swag. After hearing the. evidence, of John Keay, and James Walker, shepherds at', (3:l.^ tanner Station, William Edgar Eillena, carpentor, Burkes Pass, and James M'Gilivray, shep-.j herd, Castle Hill Station, the jury returned' the following verdict— "That the said James Crawford, on a certain day unknown, betweep the 14th and 28rd dajßVof AngiMt, ; 1873, by| and in consequence oi excessive drinking (and not from hurt, injury,",or violence, done or •ommitted to the said Jamea Crawford, to the knowledge of the said jurorf), died,"

■Nbw^ Zealand at the Vienna Exhibition I.—The1 .— The total number of different articles from ■: Tseyr Zealand, exhibited at the Vienna Exhibition? exceeds 700. Q-BBYaipxTTH Coat, Tbade. — One thousand one/ Hundred and fifty-two tons of coal were exported from the port of Greymouth during the year ending the 30th of June, to port? outside of this colony. ._AccLTMATiSATipN. r -Be3ides the distribution of fish ' during" tlfe"apjnwacfiing -summer, an attempt will be mad' 6 (-byf the. Otago Acclimatisation Society, in tEe course of a few months, to "introduce a large number of black game from the'Sighlanda i of; Scotland; Colonial Industry^ jiijn accordance wit;h instructions from Messrs Campbell and Richardspri, Napier, Eincaid arid M'Q.ueen, or' the Vulcan" Foundry^ Dunedin, are about -to build an iron screw steamer of 70;ton8 bard-en/ ; . , ; i ;__ „„ .-, .- •, ,= ? ■ r ■»- Sweeping IlßFOßir.^-lahis-electionaddi/ss at Queenatowa, Mr "Vincent Pyke said: he wrs totally opposed to imprisonment for deSfcjjbuj) considered when- a man was found guilty of defrauding: h' is 'creditors; he shouldvbe- t?eated as a criminalj^nd'sefc r io .Hard* labour ?:kb*n ordinary felon: ' ■ '•- ':•■> ■!•■■■ ■■■ •..-. ,'!' -;.>i; The DallajT Towee. — The IH'nmrw Herald of Sept. ,3 says :— ''The . casualty which .happened tb' this, vessel—being/dismasted^ when ' ab'piit , three ' thousand miles from the Australian-' cofsb- 7&ffects considerably many of our large' importers here, tbte •• vessel having ; on;? board gome, £10,000 worth of goods for Timara .firms: It is to be hoped that delays in receiving the cargo will bo the • only, loss, but , to business , ■men.' this is* t,'.serious; drawback. • „ '•..•.. " German Settlers .— The Germans settled at Puhoi, in the Province of Auckland,. for ' some .years past iseemed'tevhave proyed.themaelve*excellent settlors. A correspondent ;&t that: (flaee, .writing, t^ an Auckland paper, says : — " Those Germans- who arrived here eight or ten years ago bave- now comfortable farms' and houses^ and herds of grazing on the sides. of what wereouce densely-wooded hills, but which 'are/ now laid in English grasses. Each farmer has- a look, of .happiness and contentment about him. It should be reinem&eredj however,, thai) they had an Immigration Agent with whom they could converse and ask : advice- f roia" when they arrived in the country." , ..;; , . .;' A Mistake CoKHECT^v-^A.oreyised edition of a very highly ciyiiioed Maori exhibited an act of thotightfulrie'ss on-his- own behalf, at St ' Paul's JOhiircK, at- theinldstJr'ofi. the- service last evening, which it, : is/. doubtful whether a European couM have equsile'd ; — he certainly could, not have excelled, it.. After the, sermon the nsual collection waff madte- ; towards the offertory by the .churchwwrdenß- goiiig round ■ with the plate/ Out dtisL^.'fl-ieiid deferred to placbd in i the plate .^by. naisfcake half -a-crpvm, ;whieb he intended should, have- been a coin of ■ nearly-the same size .but,- pf^coceiderfibly less - value — a penny token^it ifr'-pi«?sum'ed. Dis--cevnrog., hia mistake j he Softj l^f float, walked iup ,tjie, church ajsW iq where, the- churchwarden was making his eoliectrjo'ui' and. ."coolly :took the ialf -crown out.ofi' thjß.fplato, making ! use of iheso wards^at^he^saSiiStime;^' No fear jaocky ! To© nJuchimpnoyt"" Then the Maori .vt!alkedback'to:aii4 took Mar aqafe with a mind iat.pjnce serone and assjuvad;... . . , . ( i iJßON.SasßiiyiNft.-r-Ip .l^st , number- of ■tlie newscw^iifiC;Weeidj/pa^e?;J/i<v», Mr Ohas. : Vincent gives some 'higkly^imtere'stiug facts in ; eonneetiooi ' iwith , ; ;the, r. f ii-oa works of • tho ! Pharaohs,' The process; of iron smelting was -carried on, in Egypt at at. nanch earlier period jibahlhas bean: generaHy; Kiipposed;.; .In; the ; sepulchres of Thebes i aiay be found, delineations of butchers sharpening their kniveß on iround bftrs 'bi iroiTattaeJtffd to "their 4 aprons. .THeihlaaes i of :the' ■kxivfeß w.^re; pqioted" blue, which fact proves that^.fchey.wer/e q£, steel, lor in/t^eitpmbjrpfi BaxEvefto^^lll. < this colour is used to indicate Btee^'brdn'zeb'eingrepresented by red. An English gentleman, has- recently discovered hear ithe- wells of Mbaes, by the Red Sea, ; tho remains «f irbn-work.s6.vast that they imisb have ■ employed thousands of workmen*. ; Near the nw>rka . are- to- be.;fpund7 the ruins of ■- »• templ&, and of a.barrack 3 for the soldiers protectiag — or keeping in order the : workmen I.'1 .' '^rk^sfe -• works are- auppoaed tobe at 'least' 300 d; yeaTß old. .Near the same spot there r aje Ipjqu^oise minea of the ancient Jggyptifljpß, and ftie very tools that were, used. It .seems thajfe. tfeefte mjcfiß.were by no means. wh^Mf^a'se^r^s^Mfiießs rW the* tur- . qiioiies 'haTfei been laiefy' obtaiiiea f rlimif uem^ and sent ove^ to England as specimens. A . ' ' XJap^Jtp'binflon, oS , 's& ■ fei^ ,Alt>i6n, wjiiclk arrived yesterday,' from Newcastle, reports. 'j that tlap schooner Mary, belonging was last while leaving Newcastle on the morn=v : commanded'byJCiptahPAimstrong, and had a i crew/.ofi.fauj«'.haijdß..:i;Shewaß. loaded with L fortSydney.-.^he l<?ffc the harbour'at 11 ". iipi; aatrpi^ gale Itom'.the/N.Wi b^wiag l i outside jattihQjtime^ An hour, after hex leav- ?• ing the harbour, she waß;.obßerv;ed to. capsize ■ when about six miles out. A signal oi dis- " treas was hoisted f at lihe Bignal-sfcabion, and a '. steamer ,' at^ once put 'off to tho resoue t On ■ arrrval' ai 'the scene of tho occurrenoe,iDot a ' vestitjo remained of the vessel or cr^w, an^ the 1 Bte'ainer' wa's compelled to retura'to p»rt,V Jer a fruitless errand,,"' The cause e£ the r mishj^| 1 is attributed to the hurried manner in VIjBBW ; veesols. usually. Jeaye, Newcastle harboUiwHHj soon 63 they ndvo completed' their loadiriMß > Many of themdo-notwait to trim tho cajSH : or batten jdbvm hatcheß> Ifuti defer" tthiß '^3| \ until they get. 'to sea, and they leave wit^H their decks strewn, with coal, their hatches™ 1 thrown loosely on, and. their cargoes as dropflß '< peil in from the boats. The! belief ia that the« schooner has been a victim to ' this practice, J 1 having put to sea without th'e r neoessary pre1 cautions' : being"; taken.-- :■ • She .: • i wai evidently | caught in the gale, and her cargo shifting, was [ unable 'to right herselfi.^Ehe: whole of her crew met with, a watery grave,—- New Zealand ' Serald, Aug. 20.

Nice Men. — During the passage of the Tfgaruru natives through town on their way to the Waitotara reserves (says the. Wangamni Herald) we noticed marching with them a couple of white men, who appeared to be treated a3 forming a portion of the- tribe- We. have since learned some particulars of these men, which are worth noticing, as indicating tne sort of characters favoured and supported By the natives. One of them formerly belonged to one of H.M.s regiments. He was in the Tauranga Ika pah at Nukumaru at the -time the attack was made on it by the Con - stabulary and Wanganui Volunteers^ but whether he took any active part in the warfare •■we are unable to* state. : Suffice it to know that he occasionally boasts of the atrocities committed on the dead and wounded by <the natives throughout the campaign. The other man, also late of H.M.s service, is .with ■« a ; crbwd of natives at the Pakaraka, and when asked by a traveller what he was doing, replied : " Oh, we're onrations now."- Kind. and indulgent country ! ho might well exclaim. ; ' Eaiiavay WokKS in North Otago.— The Oamaru correspondent of the Dunedin Gv.ar- ■ : dian says :— The portion of. ! ; ne between - Oamaru and Waitaki. is being steadily . pro- ■ ceeded witbV by the: contractors,- Messrs Allan ' and Stumbles, and the Awamoko branch has 'been coirimenced- by Messrs Proiidfoot --.there »hould be nothing to prevent- 'these Times 'being opened' witnin V twelvemonth . The Awamoko line will add greatly - to" "the rvalue of land near its" terminus, as a larger area ot land is no.w being opened up for- cultivation •'wmch hitiiferto'has been left, in' its: natural state owing to, the heavy cost of carriage— '" 'something like.thirty shillings a ton, or 9d a 3 bushelon' Wheat. The earthworks on Messrs Brogdeh's portion of the line, Oamaru and Moeraki, are.in many places >eavy, and the ' progress seems 'slow. About; 200 men are understood to.be at work on- this contract, ' ' 'which has been cut up into v, number of sub-. contracts. ,No dpubfc.advaritage will be taken ' of the fine weather to carry on the works; with • more vigour. A quantity of rails-h ave been. landed for temporary use in. the cutting. ,Th& length of the session, says the usually 'well-informed corres'pondentof the Taranahi Herald, v\\\ "mainly depend on the Government.' ' If they 'are firm and push those -measures which are of importance to. the "country, it will not be a ; lengthy, one, but if .-vthey- will allow a 'bitter, snarling, nagging Opposition to occupy the .time, of the House. • -:by. detailing their grievance's, then it may be ' very much more" "delayed then, .there is any [ .occasion J or. The work of }he session is proV .ceeding as fast as the Government supply material, and I think that, as far as ' the' legia;, , ;lation; goeß, the Governriient- .have not acted ■■■'\ wisely in providing so much. . There' seems ; a '•'.," disppsition to grant everything . the Governt inentasks for, and the session ."would be short - vbut f or, tb,e jintrpduction of biUs which have i - fpr ;; their ■objec) to remedy/ grievances ; of ' ; which the country has.nptcpmp.lamed. These attempts to hastily -legislate,, 'elspeciblly •on •j ? law ref,orm r hoover, well 'iritpijded^ have ,tho /...icffeift sometime?, of qreating.aSj'many'.'evilaj >as .-.'•' .fipjrempve^aud.'J •',. fear ;. that this r> w?ll be i.the case^thia f session." ' ..', .-. ' ' . ! i-.-i " .TJlililTAßiAiflVii.^TThe 27cw. York ' Tribune complains of soiiieiUripat'ribtic, proceed;:n ings. pf. the United States W.iar.'department :— .. '•■ ' f V Even a-nation oj^ shopkeepers might, Wu'sh to see its .battle, jelics. knocked ,dp,syn" r .to jthe iv i highest^bidder ap" so muc^oJqt.metalY; But this' is just what the War, department! has: .•ordered to,bedoiie with the^natjonal 'irophies ■. -,; stored at the Wateriire.tAr39nalT,-;jThe. unique 1 .• bronze cannon ;frpm, .J^rance/zy'Dearitig jthe >■ : names and devices, of. the Frenph jfeyplution of 1789 and r.of - Louis, X^L n ap iwej)'asi the "-:■ guns. and mortare captureSL;by t^patr^ots' at 1 Saratoga and Yor.ktown, are; consigned to the ■ ' .' auction blook. .. Ai'e we : then sp/,popr; ( _that we must sell historical mementoes .wjE^ch [can. ..- never be replaced?*. i:W» might ..better; '.afford' retrenchment in some. o,ther;direction,;j When nations deteriorate and -grow, effeminate, it is aaid that they do not care to. be ;reminded of the brave deeds of their sturdy, .ancestors'. . Perhaps the War: department ! is . only, ,an'tici- i 'i,' gating /by a :few; yearsnthelimbiepochinto .•.; which .some of bur . recent. lpublicv scandals r ] saeem to point the -national life. - ; In .Wa^liington, the other day,.*an; appreciative, hotel-' ; ikeeper bought at an auction ; irfiheiOapitol, ';:among other relics, the: Speaker's chair: usqd- in • .-the House since the . days' of > Henry/C lay. It would not have cost the natron' I . Tery much; to have kept the old bit of 'furniture j*'iti would cost nothing— but honoxir-Hto "get rid. of the trophies of Saratoga and Yorkto.wni" '■ A Sad Acoident.-^A nielanchjolj ■/•^awis has occurred at Indianapolis"' offing to an 1 actor being' bitten by a dog.' It : seems 'that there is an actor there of such exquisite proportions'that he "is known as the^A'pollb jßelvidere: " He >: was 'walking'iri'ithe Btreetij one day, and exciting 'universe!' admiration by, the exquisite proportions of his limbs," wheii' he accidentally' stepped -oh the "iail 'of a terrier, dog which happened to come across tiis'p^'tV, , The reriraged, animal" impiediat,e,ly. , turnediarid bit '"the actor 'severely Mu^tiiß^'calfl o^i the leg. The wounded' man/ however, 1 stalked on apparently .. unconscious .- of,, the injury he had received^ ' until ,"a , "l^Biand^r; called his attention to th'.e;'cii"cumßt^nce. He iramediat.ly stopped," 'and'itW'ytnipst sympathy was, -felt fpr ;^him and-expresse'd by the spectators, juntil' Jto their ''anjpzeoieittt; arid horror they saw -flowing from the wpund-j-not a drop of blood— but a thin stream of isawdust. The-inciderit naturally caused a painful sensation in the city, and i was mentioned |witli kindly regret by one of the local .papers. iThjs . annoyed the actor excessively, and announcing -his intention to chastise the' editor he 'proceeded to the office of that gentleman to 6ariy Out nTs'inTientidrij'but tbb'"mu3cles~"df his kvma. .-yroved as little formidable. as the calves' bf his a- legSjfand after a short, sharp; struggle he was "- ignominiously kicked by the editor out of his v: -room. Altogether he has aadly fallen it ths estimation of the public* 3nd it is understood lie contemplates retirement from the stage— at all events for a time.

! PArcEJAiiEinfABY. — A correspondent writI ing from Wellington, informs the Guardian j,of Saturday last, " that the Provincial Powers Borrowing* Bill, on which it is expected" there, will be some severe fighting, is certain to pass. There is no fear of the result of the debate." The same correspondent states that "the Opposition arc as gentle as lambs, saving 41essr3 T. B. Gillie 3 and Rolleston, who hare so much bitterne33 in their composition, that nothing appears to- please them." ' '■■ A Sad Case-— At the Thames a lot of little children were together, and one of them, seeing a bras 3 watch on a nail, took it down to play with, and did not return it. For this offence he was sentenced to 21 hours' imprisonment, and to be whipped. "_ Wow," writes a correspondent oi the local paper, '-in my opinion, the person who gave that child in charge for such ah offence is the party who deserved the whipping, for I never read of a more heartless and cruel proceeding. By this liEtle peccadillo his whole life has boc» blasted, and not only his, but bis parents' also. To try him as a felon will ever be a liviag scandal amongst us. For what ; can a child of ; nine years old -know of right and wrong ; and what is he likely to.', know .of' it under our present system of education? It would appear lately that the law here has been particularly, directed to the pccadilloes of children, while the man who rigs the sharemarket (thereby robbing hundreds)is looked upon as a smart man of business.: For while the powers . that be strain . at " the gnat, they . swallow the camel." .•• Yield op TnE Goi<d:fields. — Mr C. E. Haughton's report for 1873, on the goldfielda of New Zealand, has been published. It appears that whilst the results of the year T ending the 31st March, 1873, have not been so satisfactory as ; for the previous year, "yet in looking through the Warden's reports, good sound reasons -wilt be found for this'dcpression, and. good prospects for the future held - out." I'he: large. '■ falling-- oft" in ; thereturris of alluvial goldfields: is accounted for in the exceptional drynesa of the weather, and. the consequent scarcity of rwater, without which nothing can be done. The large decrease, in the yield of gold generally for. , the year 1872, as compared with 1871, "is to be attributed not so inuoh to any falling off in the yields-of the ordinary mines' as to that of the enormous returns which during the year 1871 were produced by the Caledonian mine at the Thames, being in three months alone 82,89-1 ounces. Mr Haughton says that taking all things into consideration, 'although- a considerable depression did exist over a large portion of the goldfields during the year 1871, the re-, turns from the first quarter of this year show a decided revival in all branches of this important industry — ' a revival which I take leave to think will not be transitory, but which will, under the various most favourable circumstances of the colony, develop into> the permanent -prosperity of Our mining community." . ■■" : '■" 3piKT-STOck Newspapees. — On the sub-: ject r 'df newspaper companies, the G-reymouth Star makes the following remarks :— There are- now m the colony five newspaper companies/ Viz. : in Auckland, the Southern Cross Co. ; in Nelson, the Examiner Co. ; in Christchurch, the Press Co ; and in Dunedirij 'the Daily Times ; and- the 7 Guardian Co.'s. It is a question how far the control by these cpm-j panics of ' the expression of public opinion is an advantage. It is at least easy to see that ithas a tendency to establish more permanently among- us that harrow cliqiiori which is' even now the curse of . New Zealand, which ,make's'slaVes-of our politicians, and 'mere tools of far too many electors: Where a ; newspaper is in- 'the hands of private; proprietors, with r -whpm the commercial success of their publication is 1 the main desideratum, it is- bound in order to ensure this, to express opinions,* arid advocate measures in which* some large section of the community feel a sympathy. It is,' 'in fket compelled -to^ "reflect the real feeling, existing amongst a sufficient - portion of the,' public to support it. But when a paper is in' the. hands of a company it does' ''not' by any means follow that coirmioreial success -'is' the first thing aimed at. The newspaper is then, too often employed for the purpose,- not. of' enlightening the public', but of forcing upon it the narrow views of the' proprietary, arid, of 'serving their", ulterior political' designs^'by the distortion or su^prVsrion of /facts", l and 'the '»kirful'u'Be' : bf • iictioh. ' The' monetary loss, being divided amonget a nuihbdr, is ;insignifi'cantj but the effect upon the success of thbir^ 'political designs is real and substantial. *'J Post-office : Savings 1 -; Baxks-.-— Post-office Savings' Banks appear to be -rising, in the estimation ef ■ the public^ (says the Southern Cross:) , ."No clearer evidence could beigiyen of the; continued steady prosperity ;of the colony, as exhibited by the increased savings of the working classes;- than the figures, in ■tliese returns' supply. Taking the last three years 'for; a ; criterion, the deposits have advanced in amount as follows :— IB7O, £261,328 ; 1371, £312,338; 1872, £430,877; being an increase of about 63 per cent in ■ two year? only. 'The entire amount of deposits,, inclusive of interest, in the Post-office .Savings' Banks •'on "the 31st of December last, was £490,066, 75, as against £357,65:1143 Gd^for the -previous year, or an advance of about 35 per cent drf twelve months. Thisinust be considered emirieritly satisfactory. The working exp'en^es of;the department are extremely raoderaie,; amouhting in all to ■ £1556 19s lOcl, including salaries, commission" tosub-p'ostinasters, printing, and binding, postages-stamps, and office furniture. This 'represents about threefarthings m the pound on the amount placed : to the credit of depositors at' the end of last year. The gross proceeds- from the"" Postoffice Savings' Bank-for the financial je&r,187% was £20,463 13s; which , ; -after deducting interest paid to 'depositors,-<£ 14,711 Os 21, and current expenses as ■ already- stated, shews a net profit revenue of £4168 12s 9d. This is a less amount of actual saving than was effected in 1871, owing chiefly to the rate of interest on investments by the Government having declined since that year from iix to five per cent.' The auccen of - th« iyiUm, however, it well"ai»ured."

Savings Bank Amendment Bili.. — The following is' the enacting clause of the above ! bill, which is very' short, containing besides this only a preambles and a first clause of n very few lines: — <L Whenever any surplus! profits shall accrue •• upon the transactions or business of any .Savings Bank established under the Savings- Bunk Act, 1858, in any year after paying .'all. salaries, charges, and expe.nses;in,the. managembnt thereof , together with all interest due to the depositors of such Bank, it shall 1 bo -lawful for ; the trustees of such Bank, if they thinkifit so to doj to devote and apply a porfcion-of the said surplus profits^ not exceeding! cue-half thereof, to the use. of any benevolent asylum 'or other charitable institution- -.wholly- or partly riiaintained by voluntary benevolence, within the province in which such. Baiijs; ; carries oh its business, and to pay the. sauie..tp. the treasurer or other officei- of supk institution entitled fc:> collect revenue thereof accordingly. How fab-.-vte See. — Herschel was of .opinion that, with the telesbope he used in. those researches in.- the .heavens which' immortalised his' name in the annals of science, ,he could penetrate 497 time's further than Sirius, assumed to- be at 'least so far distant- that the sun is ■ near at hand iri comparison. While exploring, with that instrument, 116,000 stars flitted by the ob-jcct-glass in one.-quavter of an hour, and. that 'sub* tended an angle of only 15 degrees. So all the worlds 'are-moving rapidly in, spaqe.. Reckoning from the > limited zone tlius. inspected, the whole celealial region could' be examined by giving tioia enough to ths entecprise ; and judging, from a few sections only within the scope of ,a33isted vision, more than five billions of'fix»d star 3 mighf; be reasonably supposed to be recognisable; and could be seen with modern, improved instru--ments: But more are beyond, vastly bsyond; and we are hoi>ing a-nd' expecting, says the 'Sei'eniljic American, that when Mr Clark, the self-made : aitrorioniei'- of Cambridge, Mas3.j' and ..the. most progressive telescope manufacturer known 'to' scientists, has completed his great work, far more amazing discoveries wilf be made in the irmamont. Surely the mechanism of She heavens demonstrates the existence of an Intelligent Fimt Cause, since such magnificent displays of unnumbered :worlds, regulated by laws which secure order in the universe, could not have originated themselves. God surely reigns and directs. The Pbk3ian Concessions to Bakon ErisiTTEß. — The Pall Mall Gazette describes the concession: which has been granted by the Shah to Baron Reuter as of so comprehensive a oharactor as to aatonish the European mind. His Majesty grants to Baron Reuter, and to any company which he may • establish for the purposes of the concession, the exclusive right to construct railways, tramways, and other public works throughout his dominions, together .with the exclusive right of working the mines and utilising the forests of the country. By the seoond article of the concession, Baron Reuter's company obtains the exclusive right of making, and of working for 70 years, railways throughout the country. . The lands necessary for the purpose will- be given by the state, so far as may be possible; and in case "lands" which are' private property should be 'required, the Pei-3ian Government undertakes to ; use its. influence to prevent exorbitant prices being . charged, and. will, if necesi sary,^. compel the owners to consent to a forced sale.. All materials will be free from import duties, and all persons engaged in the works', will be exempt from taxation.. „ The ; company are . to pay to the Government 20 per cent, on the net profits of the working of, the. line. Further articles givcithe. company the exclusive right of working, coal, iron, and copper, and lead mines, paying.a royalty. to the Government of 15 per .cent.. on. the profits. Gold and silver mines, and .mines, containing precious stones, are reserved .by the Government. The lands , necessary; for the working pf ; mines and the utilisation: of -forests will be granted free, if they, belong to the State,; in the same .as; ._,thpse required , -.for the making ofj .railw.ays ; and tram wajs. ; .The right of nmkiug \ -canals, : artesian, wells, ; and ! all o^her, iw^orks .connected ;with water cpmmuand ; water supply, is ,also guaranteed ■;tp..,the. i ;co.mpany f < under- similar • conditions. •ThfriicpmpanyAare authorise<l:,to contract a 4oan. ; s,,pf;, h £.6,000,000:- sterling r .in, „-the I first cingtancej : on which ;i the Persian Government guara»tees,s per cent per ; annum, ..with an' : additional 2 per cent, for :-j the, amortissement ;of the. capital, .and such .subsequent loans as Jtbey may -require for, the completion of the •Works with like guarantees.- ".• By? larticle 19 of ! the concession the company ; . is {to .farm; the j customs for 25 years ,-fro.m March, 187,4. Subsequent articles/provide, that the company ar# to have preference o£ Ml other- persons in case of the , establishment •: of. a; State bank, or gasworks, telegraphs, pouts, mills, manufactures, &c - -•- .... j I - ' ■ : 'i'- ; ". .■'''!•.■•• \ . ; '■-.-. '\' ■''. s '■■■"■:

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Bibliographic details

Local and General., Star, Issue 1723, 4 September 1873

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5,901

Local and General. Star, Issue 1723, 4 September 1873

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