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Local and General.

Australian Steameb. — The Claud Hamilton arrived at Hokitika last night, at eight o'clock, but full communication with the vessel was not effected. It was ascertained that the new Governor, Sir James Fergusson, and Lady Fergusson are on board, and it is understood that the steamer will proceed direct to Wellington. The Late Captain Elgae, — A portion of the remains of this ill-fated captain have been recovered. They were picked up on the beach at Amuri, and brought down by the schooner Bee to Lyttelton, thence they were removed to the room or loft over the Customs House. It is understood that an inquest will be held on the remains. M.U.1.0.0.F. — A special District Meeting, was held at the District Chambers, Lichfield street, at 3 p.m. Present — P.G.M. Bro G. Parkin, D.P.G.M. Bro Napier, and the following delegates: — P.G. Taafe, P.G. Rogers, P.G. Rankin, and P.P.G.M. Jane, of the City of Christchurch Lodge j P.D.P.G.M. Robinson, of tbe Rangiora Lodge ; P.G. Smith and P.G. Wright, of the Kaiapoi Lodge ; N.G. Hallard, Volunteer Lodge ; P.G. Bergh and P.G. Baylee, Benevolent Lodge ; V.G. Comyns, Nil Desperandum Lodge ; and N.G. Coles, Perseverance Lodge. The P.G.M. declared the meeting open fo j the election of C.S., vice Bro Slade, whei; P.D.P.G.M. James was duly elected am' installed with the usual formalities P.D.P.G.M. Bro Sharps, a delegate fron :he Volunteer Lodge, was fined for non '.ttendance. The reports of the various com aittees appointed at the April meeting, t xamine into the system of conducting th district business, having been read, were dul. eceived and unanimously adopted. P.G togers was elected treasurer. A special vot ■f thanks to b.P.G.M. Bro Thomas Napi. nd the committee who examined the bookr ms carried unanimously. A vote of thank o the presiding officers then terminated th proceedings.

The Latb Accident on the Papanwi Road. — Mr Lee, who had his leg badly fractured on the Papanui road a short time ago, has fortunately escaped the necessity of amputation, and is progressing well towards recovery. Accident. — An accident happened at Kaiapoi yesterday afternoon to a man named John Ruff. He and another person were wrestling in Mr W. Pengelly's stable, when he slipped and fell on the floor, breaking one of his legs a short distance above the ankle. He was subsequently removed to the Hospital. Exhibition of Flax Dbessing Machineby. — The deputation appointed by the Flax Association on Wednesday, to wait upon the Hon. E. Richardson with reference to the proposed exhibition of flax dressing machinery, had an interview with that gentleman at the Public Works Office, at noon yesterday. Mr Hassal was unfortunately prevented from attending, but all the other members of the committee — Messrs Jenkins, Deßourbel, and Bird — were present. The deputation was most courteously received, and a lengthened conversation took place with respect to the exhibition. . Ultimately, Mr Richardson said as soon as he got back to Wellington ho would recommend the Government to advertise immediately in the Gazette for all inventors or owners of flax dressing machinery who intended to exhibit machines, to send in their names, so that it might be known how the exhibition would be likely to be supported. He said that, in order to comply with tho resolutions of last session of the Assembly, the exhibition would take place about March, and that he would try to get a sum of £500 placed upon the Colonial estimates for the expenses of the exhibition ; also, that he would recommend the exhibition to be held in Canterbury, under the auspices of the Canterbury Flax Association, because that was the only organised body in connection with the flax industry. The deputation thanked Mr Richardson, and then withdrew. Mr E. G. Fitzgibbon, Town Clerk of Melbourne, has, in a letter addressed to the hon. the Commissioner of Customs on the subject of night signals of distress at sea, offered the following suggestion : I have the honour to submit to your consideration the expediency of adopting, in regard to Victorian vessels, and recommending the authorities of other places to adopt in regard to theirs, a regulation that the signal to be used at night in token of distress be rockets with a bursting charge of red stars and port fires of the same colour ; that the cases of such rockets and port fires be plainly marked with the words ' Distress only,' as a caution ; and that a penalty be attached to their use for other purposes. I may add that I see but little difficulty in arranging a telegraphic system of night signals to serve ordinarily urgent maritime requirements, by means of differently coloured and constructed rockets, but deem that to be of only small importance in comparison with tho immediate adoption of a simple and universally understood signal of distress." Mr Fitzgibbon, in a postscript to his letter, adds — " The Rangoon's rockets were seen in the town of Galle, but people said, ' She is signalling to the China mail boat.' The Sussex rockets were seen by the Port Phillip pilots, who said, 'It is holiday time, and these are fireworks which are being let off for amusement on shore.' The Northfleet's rockets were seen by the coastguard, who said, 'It is a ship signalling for a pilot.' " — Age. The telegraphic report of the late voyage of the clipper ship Young America shows, perhaps, the most extraordinary run ever made from Liverpool to San Francisco. The time was ninety-nine days, aud the courso lay over that long and perilous stretch of ocean around Cape Horn, at least fifteen thousand miles. This splendid feat of seamanship revives the long-agitated question how far improved models of sailing ships, guided by the best lights of nautical science, will compare in speed with steam-driven vessels, and whether they may not yet outstrip steam itself. It is far too common a mistake to suppose that such fast runs are attributable to a streak of good luck rather tban to seamanship ; for there are instances innumerable proving that the mariner, thoroughly apprised of the wind and current phenomena of the sea, is always immensely the gainer. The first attempts to apply this knowledge were crowned with success. In tho famous race from New York to the Golden Gate, in 1852, between the clippers Flyihg Fish and John Gilpin, the former made the voyage from port to anchor in ninety-two. days, and the latter, from port to Eilot, in ninety-three and a half days, and oth in more than a third less time than is usually consumed. Their voyages, however, were made ia the most auspicious season for doubling Capo Horn, and the detention so often experienced from fierce westerly gales there were not felt. We have no report of the weather off the Cape during the recent trip of the Young America, but it is just upon this point that everything turns. In December, 1853, two staunch and well-mastered vessels left Liverpool in company, both bound for Valparaiso, and kept singularly close to each other as far south as St. John's Cape, Staten Island, on the eastern side of the Horn. They wero almost in sight of each other, three hours' sail only intervening. One of thoso vessels tacked inshore and endeavoured to round the Cape, while the other stood far away to the southward, * and, though making easting all the time, ran down to sixtytwo degrees south latitude. The latter vessel, there encountering propitious winds, made a rapid run to her port and reached it nine days before her consort. In comparing heir logs it was actually found that on one ■lay, when the most successful ship made five degrees of westing with north-west winds (in latitude sixty-one degrees south), the other liad been drifting eastward in a north-west •ale. It is to be greatly hoped that the preent British Exploring Expedition in the •Jhallenger will thoroughly test the differen! hip routes for the boisterous southern capes : ■ut meantime our naval authorities might cry well have these routes explored mon ully than haa over been done."— -New York Herald,

Catholic— The following items, are extracted from the Ifeio Zealand Tablet : — The people of Rangiora, Canterbury, aye very anxious to have a resident priest, and are prepared to build him a suitable residence. There is a nice Church already built, and there is also a good site for a house, with ground for a garden. — Preparations are being made for the erection of a new Catholic Church at Timaru. New Bbighton. — Since last noticing this locality, several additional sections of land haTe been purchased, one large residence has been built on the beach and another is in contemplation. The contractors for the new road are progressing /very satisfactorily with their work, and they are doing the work in a substantial manner. The Avon Road Board have recommended the Government to reserve a site for a public recreation ground in the district. Scholarships. — The examination of candidates for the provincial scholarships in class D, under 14 years, was commenced at the Literary Institute yesterday, and will be concluded this afternoon. Six out of the seven boys who had sent in their names put in an appearance, and accommodation was provided for them in .the rooms of the Philosophical Institute. ' The- examination is being conducted by the Rev. W. J. Habens and Mr J. C. Veel. The members of the Board of Education have displayed considerable interest in the examination. Mebitale. — The third entertainment of the winter series was given in the church schoolroom last night. There was a moderate attendance, and the Rev. F. Knowles presided. The programme was opened by an instrumental duett ; Mr Sims, piano, and Mr Thomas, violin. During the evening readings were given by Messrs E. A. Worthy, D. Craig, and J. Mills ; pianoforte duetts, by Mrs and Miss A. Lane ; Mr Sims and Miss Ollivier; pianoforte solo, by Miss Rule; songs, by Messrs A. M. Ollivier and Plimmer. The National Anthem terminated the proceedings. Football. — The match between tho Club and tho College will be continued on Saturday next, but will commonce at 2.45 p.m., instead of 3 p.m., as at 5 o'clock it is almost too dark to play. The^f ollowing are the sides : — The Club— Messrs Anson, Barker, Chapman, Dobson, Fowler, Grey, Hawkes,|Loughnan, Macquarie (captain), Martin, Moore, O'Connell, Ollivier, Potts, and Wilkin ; reserves, Messrs Bray, Dobson, Searell, and Miles. The College—Rev Brittan, Messrs Corfe, E. Cotterill, H. Cotterill, Aldred, Barker, Chapman, Gould, Harfcland, Morgan, Mathias, Ollivier, Nalder, Rhodes, and Westenra. The game will be played in Cranmer square. Union Rowing. Club. —An adjourned general meeting of this club was called for last evening at the Clarendon Hotel, for the purpose of considering the advisability of having an united club in Christchurch formed by an amalgamation of existing clubs. The commodore of the club (Mr N. " G. Glassford) occupied the chair. Tho minutes of the previous meeting were read and confirmed. On the motion of Mr R. P. Crosbie, seconded by Mr Mountfort, it was resolved to obtain the signatures of all the members of the club, as giving their vote for, or against, the proposed amalgamation. The hon secretary was instructed to carry out the above-named arrangement, and the meeting adjourned until eight o'clock on the 28th inst., ai the same place ; when all the clubs are to bring in reports ; the committee to meet half au hour before that time. ' Concebt. — Mr Landergan may be congratulated upon the success which, upon the whole, attended tho concert given last night in the Oddfellows' Hall, in aid of the funds for enlarging and improving the organ in S. John's Church. The programme . submitted consisted of instrumental musio interspersed with vocal selections, and the only fault that could be found with it was, that the former preponderated too much, the pieces beisg collectively too numerous, and, individually, too long. Each part of tho concert was opened by an overture, played by an orchestra consisting of members of the Orchestral Society. The first overture (Figaro) was exceedingly well played, and the same may be said of the second (Masaniello), for which the band received the unusual and very exacting compliment of a vigorous and persistent encore. A response was unavoidable. The other instrumental pieoes were' duets for ooncerfcina and pianoforte, horn and pianoforte, flute and. pianoforte, and clarionet and pianoforte. The leading instruments were played by Miss L. Taylor, Messrs Packer, Poore, and Triphook, respectively, Mr Landergan taking the pianoforte part in each instance. The nameß of the performers are a sufficient guarantee that justice was done to each. Beethoven's quartetto in C minor Op. 4, waß given by Messrs Bonnington and Palairet (violins), Landergan (viola), and Spensley (violoncello). Tho last movement was especially well performed; Hummel's trio in F major, Op. 22, as on a previous occasion, was decidedly the best thing in the programme. The vocal music included two solos and four partsongs. "The Birds were telling one another," was tastefully rendered by Miss Ada Taylor, who acknowledged tho well deserved compliment of an encore. Mrs Wood sang "Once Again," but although musically correct, she failed to give it proper expression. The part songs comprised Mendelssohn's "Hunter's Farewell," and Hatton's "Trust her not," "Stars of the Summer Night," and "Autumn Winds," tho parts being taken by Messrs Appleby and J. Anthony (tenors), and Hobbs, Anthony, and Allwright (basses). Considering that the performers had been unable to meet more than mcc for practice, their execution of these tongs was extremely creditable and evidently pleasing to the audience, who obtained a repetition in one instance, and asked for it in each >f the others. The attendance was scarcely so arge as it might have been, but a considerable •urn must have been netted towards the object in view. '

Fibe at Pbebbleton.— About six o'clock on Wednesday evening, Mr William Prebble's straw stacks were destroyed by fire, and the loss is considered to be the work of an incendiary. The straw represented the whole yield of about seventy acres, and, with fifty or sixty bushels of wheat, was totally destroyed. Some of the straw had already been sold, and other portions were under promise to different persons. Had it not been that one of Mr Prebble's men saw the fire early, and raised an alarm,|about ten sacks of wheat in addition to that already mentioned would have |been destroyed. The stacks had been lately threshed, and a portion of the wheat was waiting to be carted away. The ten sacks saved were only got away with considerable difficulty. Geeman Association.— The third annual dinner of the German Association was held at the Empire Hotel, High street, last night. [ About fifty gentlemen sat down to a repast provided by Mr Carl, with taste, skill, and liberality. Mr Hansman, president of the Association, occupied the chair, and Mr Ebert officiated as croupier. The cloth being removed, the toast list was proceeded with. The chairman proposed " the Queen and all the members of the Royal Family," which was enthusiastically honoured. The chairman next proposed the toast of *' The Emperor of Germany and all the Imperial . Family." He said the relations of their country with England had always been of the most friendly character, and he hoped would {continue so. He considered all Germans ought to be proud of their Emperor, and therefore he hoped the toast would be drunk in a befitting manner. The drinking of the toast was followed by demonstrative cheering. The vice-chairman proposed " Sir George Arney, the Acting-Governor of the colony." " The Wacht en Rhein " was afterwards sung by members of the Liederfcafel. Mr Taylor proposed " The Army, Navy, und Volunteers," which- was loudly cheered. Mr J. Zien sung " Prince Eigenius." Mr Schmidt proposed " The Superintendent and Provincial Council," remarking that he thought they could nofc get a better Superintendent, and that he hoped they would keep him Tor many years. Mr Bourgeois sung " Lief under der Erde." Mr Tisch. proposed " The Mayor and City Council." -Mr Fuchs sung » Beautiful Isle of the Sea." Mr Tisch next proposed the health of Mr Hassal, German Consul in Canterbury, and Mr Niss, in responding, Baid Mr Hassal deserved the thanks of tha society for his uniform kindness and courtesy. Mr Ebert sung " Mein Liebchen ist ein alpuerin." Mr Tisch gave a German recitation, which created much amusement. The members of the Liedertafol then sung "Liitzow's Wild Chase." Mr Schmidt proposed success to the German Society, remarking that it had increased considerably since it was established, and that he hoped it would continue to do so. The toast was enthusiastically drunk. A German chorus was next sung by the whole company. Mr Haytor. proposed the health of " The President," to which, after a song from Mr Bourgeois, the chairman responded. Several other toasts were "drunk, including " Mr Ruddenklau," "The Vice-chairman," "The Host and Hostess," "The Architect of the Gorman church, Mr. Jacobsen," "Tho builder of the church, Mr Greig," " The Press," "The Secretary, Mr Schwartze," " The Treasurer, Mr Schmidt." During the evening, Mr Tisch stated that the last cheque had been paid that day for tho German church, and that it was now free from debt. With reference to the peal of bells, he said that the action of the Germans in this matter would set a good example to their English friends, and he announced that Messrs Schmidt, Gherken, EJruise, and himself, had jointly given £50 towards the bells. Several other toasts and songs followed, but the party did not break up until a late hour.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18730613.2.7

Bibliographic details

Local and General., Star, Issue 1654, 13 June 1873

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2,916

Local and General. Star, Issue 1654, 13 June 1873

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