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Local and General.

Magisterial. — At the Christchurch Magisstrats's Court this morning, Martin Warren, arrested by constable Eares, was brought up beforo C. C. Bowen, Esq., R.M., for having been drunk and disorderly yesterday, and the offence being proved, a fine of 20s was imposed. Insectivorous Birds. — Mr Bills, with a consignment of 1000 birds in his charge, is a passenger on board the Charlotte Gladstone, which should arrive early next month. /"Half-Holiday. — The second mid-week -v+as observed yesterday, but there was more than one secession from the agreement to close, and unless the promoters take active steps in the interim it is probable that the closing next Thui'sday will be a very partial one. Several tradesmen feel aggrieved at the neglect of one or two of their number to close yesterday, and threaten that if repeated next week they will all follow the example/ Presentation. — A present?* tion was made yesterday "afternoon at the Ladies' College, St. 'Asaph street west, to Mra Deighton, by the parents of pupils recently attending her school in Lichfield street, but who owing to the distance of the present school from the centre of the town have been unable to continue them. The presentation was made by the Rev. A. F. Douglas on behalf of the donors in a : highly eulogistic speech. Mr J. P. Restell, Inspector of/Schools also spoke highly in favour of Mrs 3>eighton as an able and successful teacher, ■prophesying a satisfactory career in tho more •extended sphei'e in which she had embarked. Mrs Deighton having acknowledged, the gift in suitable terras, the proceedings terminated. Masonic. — The annual meeting of the District Grand Lodge of Canterbury was held in tlie Canterbury Masonic Hall, at half -past seven o'clock last evening. In the unavoidable abscucc o£ the R. W. Dist. G. M. (Bro. Donald), the chair was taken by Ms deputy, Bro. C. W. Bishop. The lodge having been opened in due form, Bro. Bishop, on behalf of tlie District Grand Master, announced the following appointments in the Grand Lodge for 1572 :— S.W., Bro. H. Thomson ; J.W., Bro. F. J. Smith ; Secretary, Bro. A. F. N. Blakiston ; Treasurer, Bro. W. Mills ; S.D., Bro. E. S. Willcocks; J.D., Bro. King, (Timaru); organist, Bro. J. W. Oram ; Superintendent of Works, Bro. J. Booth ; assistant ditto, Bro. M'Lellan ; D.C., Bro. R. D. Thomas ; Pursuivant, Bro. T. Stapleton. Bro. J. C. Angus was selected to fill the] office of D.G. Registrar, but the appointment was not accepted. Several of the brethren apjiointed were not in attendance, and will not be invested, therefore, until the next quarterly communication. A.O.F. — The installation of officers of Court Star of Canterbury, for the ensuing six months, took place on Monday evening last. The retiring C.R. Bro. Pine* P.D.C.R. was duly presented with a P.C.R's neck-ribbon and certificate by the C.R. elect (Bro. W. W. Stevens.) At the conclusion of the ceremony P.D.C.R. Crooks, the treasurer of the Court, presented the Court, through P.C.R. Phio, with a portrait of himself elegantly framed, and which represents him wearing the regalia of tho order. He said he embraced the present opportunity of so doing, as a particular mark of respect to Bro. Pine, who had filled the chair so ably. He then addressed the members, stating that he had now been elected to the office of treasurer for the twenty-third time. It had always been his endeavour to fill that office to the credit of the court, and with satisfaction to himself, aud it still would be his aim so to do. He thanked the members for the confidence they reposed in him, and whenever it was the will of Providence to remove him his portrait would remind them of one who once held the interests of Foresters dear to his heart. Bro. Pine then thanked Bro. Crooks for the memorial, on behalf of the Court, and! requested it to be hung in a conspicuous part of the hall.

'Artesian Wells. — During the past year there have been about 111 artesian wells sunk within the boundaries of the city, making the total number now in existence about 629. Itis therefore no wonder that the -supply of water should have visibly decreasechv Acclimatisation Society. — A letter has been received from Mr P. L. Sclater, secretary of the Zoological Society, London, stating that in return for native birds and fish sent from here by the Acclimatisation Society, the following consignment is being sent by passenger ship, viz. : 1 pair mandarin ducks, 1 pair Carolina ducks, and 1 pair Brent geese.

Trinity Church Sunday School. — Wednesday was a red letter day with the juveniles belonging to this school, and certainly, lookiug at the long line of youngsters marching through the streets on that morning, it would seem that Canterbury will not in a few years need any additional emigrants. At an early hour the children began to assemble at the school, and shortly before nine o'clock they marched to the church, where a short service was held. Thence they made their way to Peacock's Wharf, to the s.s. Gazelle, which had kindly been placed at the service of the committee. By ten o'clock the whole of the party, numbering nearly 400, were safely on board the vessel, and we think that on occasions like these other than parents and teachers should be excluded, as it interferes a great deal with the committee's arrangements. The party left the wharf shortly after ten o'clock, and soon anchored in the place chosen (Charteris Bay), the Rev. R. Bradley having kindly given the use of his paddock for the occasion. The children were promptly landed, and games of all kinds were got up for their amusement, and the creature comforts were not forgotten. A very happy day was spent, and, before re-embarking, Mr H. R. Webb moved a vote of thanks to Mr and Mrs Bradley for their kindness to the children during the day. The children gave three vigorous cheers for the friends who had so kindly entertained them, and three cheers were also given for Mr and Mrs Knowles and Mr and Mrs H. R. Webb. The party were detained somewhat later thau they intended, owing to the steamei* getting aground, but the committee, among whom especially we may mention Messrs Joyce, Day, and Graham, did their utmost to make the delay less irksome. Woolston Library. — A general meeting of members was held in the Christian Chapel, at eight o'clock last night, for the purpose of receiving a report as to the Government grant, and to consider other matters of importance. Mr E. Bamford presided, and stated that the Mutual Improvement Society, having decided at the request of the secretary to withdraw their application for the Government to the district, he waited on the Pro vincialSecretary from whom he obtained £10 for books, with a promise of £15 more, when required, towards the erection of a building for the library. The principal business of the meeting was therefore to decide about the ordering of a number of books, and to elect a treasurer in place of Mr R. Davis, who had declined to act. It was a question whether it would be best to arrange now for the selection of the first instalment of books and periodicals for the library, or to wait until such time as there were more funds in hand, when no doubt the purchase could be made at a cheaper rate. The meeting had better decide this first, and then it would be desirable to obtain suggestions as to the books to be ordered. There were at present twenty members on the list. After some conversation, it was resolved to postpone the purchase of books and periodicals until the district had been canvassed for subscriptions. The appointment of a treasurer was thon proceeded with. Mr Stamford proposed that Mr W. Taylor be appointed to the offices. Mr Millburn seconded the motion. Mr Norris said the meeting had not power at present to appoint Mr Taylor, because he was a member of tlie committee. It was then decided to postpone the matter until next meeting. Mr Millburn moved that Messrs Norris and Davis be requested to collect subscriptions forthwith, and report to an adjourned general meeting of members, to be held on Thursday, the 25th inst. Mr Cole seconded the motion, which was agreed to. Woolston Sports. — A final meeting of the Sports Committee was held at the Wharf Hotel ou Wednesday evening — Mr F. Pavitt in the chair. The treasurer reported that the receipts had been — from entries, £7 10s ; gate money, £13 4s 6d ; subscriptions, £34 6s ; total, £55 Os 6d ; and the expenditure — in ! prizes, £22 10s ; band, £10 10s ; advertising, labour, &c., £21 5s ; total, £54 ss ; leaving a balance of 15s 6d. The chairman observed that considering the short time the committee had at their disposal for arranging the sports, they were a great success. (Hear, hear.) The first meeting in reference to them was not held until the 13th Dec, added to which it must also be considered that the district was quite new to tlie work. Altogether, he thought they had come out of the matter very creditably. (Hear, hear.) It must be remembered, however, that not a little of the general success was due to the assistance thoy had received from gentlemen residing outside the Woolston district, and that should be acknowledged. After a brief conversation it was resolved — " That a vote of thanks be recorded to Messrs Crosbie, Pavitt, Hopkins, the hon. secretary (Mr Bamford) and others who took an active part in carrying out tho sports, also that tlie secrotary be instructed to write to Mr Crosbie, whose management contributed greatly to the success of the sports, conveying the special thanks of the meeting for the indefatigable manner in which he had discharged the duties entrusted to him. A vote of thanks was also recorded to Messrs Malcolm and Duncan for the great trouble they took in getting up the.horticultural show. Accounts amounting to £24 were passed for payment, and it was agreed that the credit balance shown in the treasurer's statement should be handed over to tho cricket club. The meeting then terminated.

Westland Goldfields. — The West Coast goldfields, especially in the Grey district, are improving/ The Customs revenue at Greymouth for 1871 was over £4000 in excess of the previous year, and nearly £8000 higher than in 1869. During the first week of this year, 22,069 ozs of gold were shipped from the West Coast, 14,809 ozs from Hokitika, and 7026 from Graymouth. The gold from Hokitika included 7045 ozs from the Nelson diggings, that amount having been sent from Westport a few days prior to the departure of the Melbourne steamer. The value of this exportation is £82,808.

Sporting. — The Americans, it appears, possess, this season, a colt of more than ordinary merit in Harry Bassett, and are anxious to test the powers of English and American thoroughbreds by a match at even weights with one of the best English three-year-olds. Colonel Bruce — his owner — has offered to match him against Sterling, whose performances during the past year deservedly place him in the first rank, at 7st 121bs each ; one mile and a half ; the match to be run in America. Sterling's engagements, it was thought, would prevent the match taking place. Mr Blaydon, however, the owner of Sterling, immediately after Sterling's victory in the Free Handicap Sweepstakes, at the Newmarket Houghton meeting, scratched him for the 200 soys. sweepstakes with Favonius, and commissioned Mr Tattersall to make the match for £10,000; one mile and-a-half ; even weights; and to allow Harry Bassett £2000 if he would run in England. In other words, Sterling's owner is prepared to stake £12,000 to £3000 upon his colt. So superior do the Americans consider Harry Bassett to any of their own horses, that, in any weight for age race for which he is entered, the only question is who will he second.

The Cruise of the Flying Sqtjadrom. — "iEgles " of the Australasian states that the authorship of that wonderful literary production " The Cruise of the Flying Squadron," need not be a secret any longer. The gallant British naval officer who so handsomely requited colonial hospitality was Lieutenant Bruce, of H.M.S. Liverpool, son of Sir H. Hervey Bruce, Bart, M.P. Lieutenant Bruce was not so proud of his work as to openly acknowledge it. He didn't care that the young ladies, out of whose flirtations he meanly made much literary capital, should be able to recognise him as a man to "kiss and tell." But his father's admiration of the lieutenant's literary talents has led to a disclosure. Sir Hervey presented the volume to the Coleraine Mechanics' Institute, and the gift was duly notified in the local journal. The editor, who says he has cursorily glanced at the contents, has made an extraordinary discovery. The book, he says, gives glimpses of the " society to be met with by British officers among the people of tho colonies and countries with which this country has had friendly or official intercourse, and that, too, in a frank sailor-like fashion, for which we like it all the better." There should be a little reciprocity in these things. A frank expression of opinion some of the distinguished visitors we have had from the old country might not be altogether complimentary.

New Zealand Hot Springs. — A correspondent of tho Australasian writes as follows : — Observing that excursion steamers are leaving this port for places in New Zealand, more particularly in the Middle Island, and knowing that the hale and hearty are the usual passengers on such trips, I wish to draw the attention of those who are afflicted iv health to the renovating properties o£ the mineral springs of the Northern Island of New Zealand. These springs range from cold to boiling heat (the natives cooking their food in the latter), and are particularly efficacious in cases of rheumatism, cutaneous eruptions, scrofula, and indiscretions arising from excess and fast living. Having derived incalculable benefit from them I should be ungratef ul were I not to make known their blessings to suffering humanity. Hitherto they have been nearly unknown, as their position in an inaccessible country precluded invalids from visiting them; now the roads are made, and they are rendered easy of access. Situate halfway between Auckland and Napier, arrangements could easily be made to visit them from either place ; the time occupied would be about 14 days there and back. I will merely mention two instances of their virtue that came under my notice. A man engaged in erecting the telegraph poles was bent nearly double with rheumatism ; as he reached the springs he availed himself of them, and on passing him a fortnight ago, he was erect and working hard. A young man from England, with the effects of disease contracted there, joined the constabulary forco ; in a short time, through marching and exposure, he became so bad that he was literally "weary of life ;" he obtained a week's pass, took the baths, and came back a new creatui'e, and is now with the field force, able to do his duty with auy of his comrades. To fast young men who havo drunk the dregs of the cup of pleasure the springs aro indeed a blessing, and I seriously beg to draw then* most earnest attention to them ; better spend their holidays thero and return new men, than patch up and never get well. An English nobleman well known in these colonies, so thoroughly appreciated them that, when pronounced incurable in England, ho purchased a yacht and returned to New Zealand, and entirely recovered. I have left that part and havo no personal interest in the island, but I deemed it a duty to draw attention to their marvellous benefits*. The botanist would be lost in admiration at the splendid specimens of ferns; the finest I have seen here are literally trash to those found in the Lake Districts, noi here and there one, but gorge after gorge almost impassable with them. Should yfche steamboat company so arrange that passengers could avail themselves of this part of the country, fchey would reap a rich harvest in ensuing seasons, as invalids would flock there on the results being known.

St Albans Edttcationax District. — A meeting of the committee was held on Wednesday evening, when all the members were present, Mr Turner in the chair. Having read the Education Ordinance cai*ef ully over, in order to become acquainted with its provisions, the committee proceeded to discuss the question of occupying the Wesleyan schoolroom for the new school, but it was ultimately decided to postpone the question for further consideration until next meeting. A calculation, showing that the probable income of the committee would be about £500, it was decided to advertise for a schoolmaster and mistress, and two pupil teachers, forthwith. The committee then adjourned until Wednesday week.

Billiards. — A curious match at billiards came off lately in London between two men named Izar and Stammers. The latter, who is a professional, played with the cue, and the former with Ins fingers. The match was one of 250 cannons, Stammers receiving 50 points. The game, which caused a great deal of amusement to tho spectators, proved a very close affair, Izar winning by six points only. It it said that some of his manipulations were simply wonderful.

Major Ropata. — The Southern Cross is informed that Major Ropata has acted really handsomely in his method of dealing with the well-earned £1000 reward paid by the Government for the capture of Kereopa. It is usual for the leading chief who may sell land, or otherwise obtain possession of money, to appropriate all of it, or as much as lie possibly can, for his own exclusive benefit. Upon receiving the £1000, however, Ropata divided it evenly between himself and followers, every member of the party receiving as large a share as their leader. Such an act is not only creditable to Ropata, but shows that tho confidence which the Government have reposed in him is not misplaced. Provincialism. — His Honor Mr Justice Richmond, in his address to the Grand Jury, at Nelson, the other day, had a few words to say about provincialism. Speaking of the necessity of increased means for preventing crime, his Honor said : — " He was no optimist, and did not believe in the possibility of the complete banishment of crime from amongst us, which, indeed could never be accomplished so long as drinking habits were so prevalent in tlie colony, but he did think that if the criminal classes were properly dealt with, their numbers might be very largely decreased. There were, however, various obstructions in the way of attaining so desirable an end, among which might be named the local jealousies that existed in New Zealand. Provincialism, in some respects, was no doubt an excellent thing, but one of its drawbacks was that it tended to prevent any united attempt being made for the suppression of crime ; there were also colonial as well as provincial divisions, which, at present, stood in the way, but he felt sure that the time would come when these would be got over, and the whole group of the Australian colonies would work together in the endeavour to lessen the amount of crime that vow existed hi them. Our system of police aud gaols was so defective as to render any attempt to put down crime most unsatisfactory, if not impracticable, whereas, if proper facilities existed, in the shape of penal establishments, the gradual extermination of the criminal class might reasonably be looked for as the irredeemable ones might be taken care of for life, and endeavours made to reform those who were less hardened.

Traction Engines. — In an article on roadengines the Aberdeen Serald says : — Wc are glad to observe that the traction-engine is beginning to have in this quarter the attention it has for some timo back been claiming in other quarters, and that its merits deserve. The traction goods engine has for a considerable time back been familiar on our streets through the enterprise of Mr White, grain merchant, and traction passengerengines have been introduced in America, in France, and in some parts of our own country. The experiment appears to have been in all cases successful. And now we have from oui* public-spirited townsman, Mr Keith, King street, intimation of an intention to put traction-trains for goods and passengers on the three main lines of road in Aberdeenshire, beginning, it is understood, with the Dee-sido. These traction trains havo the great advantage of taking up and delivering freight at the very doors of their customers, thus saving the extra cost of loading and carrying to and from railway stations. That cost in some eases amounts to a very heavy charge on railway customers. It puts a most important branch of our local trade to serious disadvantage. The nearest railway station to the chief of our great red granite quarries in the neighbourhood of Cruden is Peterhead, about six miles' distance, whither the stones have to be carted from the quarries at a cost of 4s per ton. Then, after they have been brought by a long roundabout route to Aberdeen, another ls per ton has to be paid for conveyance from tho railway station to tho dressing yards — an extra charge of 5s per ton over and above tho railway freight. That 5s per ton would suffice of itself to bring the stones direct from the quarries to Aberdeen by traction engine; aud allowing for the various loadings and unloadings and other causes of delay by the railway route, it is not improbable that tho freights might come on an average more quickly per road than they can como by rail." After answering objections to danger in the use of such engines, the same journal says: — " Thero is no reason why traction engines should be injurious to the roads — quite the reverse. Lord Kinnaird maintains that they are a benefit to the roads — serving by their combined weight and breadth of wheel rim as so many steam rollers for the levelling and consolidation of the roads. Where traction engines have been used in the South as a motive power for the plough, it has been complained of them that, iv their transit over the unploughed land, they so harden it as to make its tillage difficult. This objection on arable ground would become a recommenda-

tion ou the roads. There has been a good deal of grumbling in this district that the Road Trustees have not seen their way to secure the use of a steam roller. These traction engines may turn out so many gratis steam rollers on our main lines of thoroughfare."

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Bibliographic details

Local and General., Star, Issue 1220, 19 January 1872

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3,798

Local and General. Star, Issue 1220, 19 January 1872

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