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THE GENERAL ELECTIONS.

4, DECLARATION OF THE POLL FOR SELWYN. Previous to the declaration of the poll, which had been fixed to take place at 6 p.m. yesterday, some excitement was felt in the neighbourhood, from the fact having transpired that Mr Stevens had protested against two of the votes recorded on the previous day. At a few minutes before 6, therefore, a considerable number of electors were present at the Road Board Office. Precisely at 6 p.m., Mr E. J. Lee. the Returning Officer, appeared id front of the office, and declared the numbers to be as follows :— • Reeves 102 Stevens 101 Mr Lee then declared Mr Reeves, of Christchurch, to be the representative of the Selwyn Dißtrict in the General Assembly. The announcement having been received wilh cheers, Mr Reeves thanked the electors for the honour they had done him in placing him at tbe head of the poll. At such an auspicious moment, he would say nothing that would add in the slightest degree to the regret that must bo felt by his opponent. He gave Mr Stevens the fullest credit for the ability and vigour with which he had conducted the election. He could assure the electors that he fully realised the credit and responsibility that were attached to his present position. He could assure them, in spite cf what might have been told them, that though he went up to the Assembly as an avowed supporter of the present Government, he was at the same time thoroughly independent. He supported the Government solely because he believed them to be men who could advance the interests of the colony. If he saw them departing from their plans, or going wrong, he would most assuredly vote against them. Mr Stevens s rid that he could have seconded the vote of thanks to the Returning Officer with more perfect satisfaction had he , not felt that that gentleman had committed , an error, in admitting two votes whioh he (Mr Stevens) believed to have been illegally : recorded. In the interests of his supptiriers, i he should feel bound to take the be6t avail- ■ able legal opinion on this point, and there ; fore, at present he could not look upon this I ' election as having been finally decided. If, - however, this should be the case, it miyht happen that he had been now attending his ' own political funeral, and, if so, he thought I that his end had been a brilliant one. He i had lost the election by ONE. When he , last came to Leeston, after the last session, 1 scarcely a voice was to be heard in hi.

favour, but now he had polled a majority at Leeston. He considered that a victory, for ; it would go forth to the world that the great agricultural district of Leeston had actually voted against protection. He thanked his supporters, who had fought so gallantly for ; him. Mr Reeves having proposed, and Mr Stevens seconded, a vote of thanks to the Returning Oflicer, the proceedings were j brought to a close.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TS18710203.2.15

Bibliographic details

THE GENERAL ELECTIONS., Star, Issue 839, 3 February 1871

Word Count
509

THE GENERAL ELECTIONS. Star, Issue 839, 3 February 1871

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