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Mr Vernon C. Redwood, the -yell-known Queensland politician, has gone to Milan at the age of 89 to study for grand opera. Mr Redwood is a'cousin of Archbishop Redwood, of Wellington. •' ■ ■ * • Miss Blanche Clements has been in Sydney on a visit. She is an actress who did capable work with the Anderson, Dampier, and other dramatic companies. She is also one of the most widely - travelled of our Australian actresses, having toured India and the East with the Pollards. •■■■■•■ 0' • Mr Norman Churton, an Invercargill basso, is at present appearing with Mr Marcus St. John, an English society entertainer, at the Athenaeum Hall, Melbourne. • • • Mischa Elman is a great musician, but he is as vitally interested in the crop statistics as any expert. He does not oare about them for purposes lof speculation for Elman never has gone in for that game, his interest being that of a farmer. Back in Russia Elman has a farm of several hundred acres. There he tries to spend a part of every summer. When he is absent, however, he asks and receives daily reports on the progress of the growing plants and cereals, on the condition of the soil, and how the live stock is getting on. It is this broad viewpoint that keeps Elman so -.veil during his long concert seasons, for he thinks of other matters than those purely musical. Just before he left Europe for his present American tour, the violinist and his farm manager had a farewell talk. They discussed the principal plans that were to be carried out in Elman's absence, ending with the latter's reminder to his employee to send him regular reports. "I think," said the manager, after some reflection, will have to advance a $ijft hi our submitting of reports. Until' now I have covered several pages of paper putting down facts that you wanted to know. On the farm we are scientific. Let us be scientific in preparing reports. Let us get some blank form printed, and then I can do that nart of the work in one tenth the time I used to take." "All right," replied Elman, with a grin, '"get them."

Lauder is to-day as enthusiastic for Sabbath rest as ever he was as a humble working miner in Scotland. In America, Lauder's reasonable bent for one day's quiet in seven has conflicted with his vaudeville engagements, for it is the rule on many circuits to give performances twice every day in the week. The comedian has lost a good deal of money on this account, and if he were not so important an artist mariy managers Avould refuse to engage him on any other basis but that of fourteen appearances a week.

Mr Maurice Ralph, who is now in New Zealand supervising the oroduction of "The Miracle," the picture feature film, has received word from .Australia that "Tokio Town," which has for two years been successfully touring Australia, will shortly visit the Dominion. "Tpkio Town" is a village of Japanese men and women, 30 in number, and their entertainment is somewhat on the lines of "Tiny Town," the successful little show that recently toured this country. Before the actual performance of "Tokio TownV starts, the Japanese are to be seen as in their native villages in Japan, making baskets, fancy work, lacquer ware, paintings, silk work, and the hundred and one things these fascinating neople are co adept at. The show itself consists of Japanese singing and dancing in native costume, exhibitions of ju-jitsu, legerdemain and magic, ladder balancing, and acrobatic work, for which these

people are specially famous. Before the "Tokio Town" troupe of performers were -allowted to leave Japan special permission had to bo received from the Mikado to allow them to tour. The Mikado gave permission for a period of two years, but their tour has been so successful, another term of one year was recently granted. They now have to report themselves in Japan in January, 1915. "Tokio Town" is a bright, entertaining and novel show, and will no doubt be appreciated. • * • During his recent tour through America and on the Continent Mr Hugh D. Mcintosh, the governing director of the Richards' Tivoli Theatres, Ltd., found that in all the best vaudeville houses opera glasses were provided for the use if patrons of "the sialls and dress circle. With a view to bringing his theatres thoroughly up - todate, Mr Mcintosh purchased 2000 pairs of glasses. Hugh didn't get the idea from Auckland. • » » The annual musical festival at the Princess's The.atre on Good Friday night will be the occasion of the reappearance in Melbourne of Mr Phillip Newbury. Mr Newbury has for some months resided in Auckland. <,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TO19140411.2.17

Bibliographic details

Observer, Observer, Volume XXXIV, Issue 31, 11 April 1914

Word Count
780

Observer Observer, Volume XXXIV, Issue 31, 11 April 1914

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