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CAP AND JACKET

By Boi.

' Racing Fixtures. January 29, February 2 and puna Jockey Club. # January 29 — Ngaruawahia Racing Club. '. ' '„ • March 26, 28 and Racing Club. ' May 21 and 24—Takapuna Jockey Club. June 3, 4 and B—Auckland Racing Club. AUCKLAND TROTTING CLUB'S . \ SUMMER MEETING. 4

THE three days' Summer Meeting of the Auckland Trotting Club was brought to a conclusion at Alexandra Park last Saturday. Slight showers fell towards evening, but for the rest the weather was fine. There was a good attendance, though somewhat short of the holiday numbers of the first two days . Mr C. F. Mark, secretary, carried out the business arrangements with despatch,/ and the various other offices were ably filled. The programme was productive of interesting racing. Mandarene, a three-year-old colt by Norval, put up a fine performance in the principal trotting event, the President s. A protest was lodged against the winner for boring, end Further enquiry into the matter has yet to be made. There was a surprise in the pony event, Miss Stella winning handsomely, and landing an almost neglected chance. She defeated a strong public fancy in Mighty Atom? who, this time, met his match at the weights. The. merits of the victory of Irish Molly in the Onslow Class Trot were unfortunately dimmed. The favourite, Phyllistina, spoiled her own chance and those of others by vagaries at the post, whereby Vera lost her rider, and several other competitors got mixed up just at the critical moment of starting, so, that what promised to, be a pretty race was utterly spoiled. \ The final event was won by Rawene, a six-vear-old mare by Albert Victor, hailing from Upper Hutt. , She was made favourite, and proved equal to the effort demanded of her. For the whole meeting the club came out satisfactorily on the financial side, and but for the wet day on the 31st December the results would have been still better. Whilst it was hard luck for the club that one of the few wet afternoons of the holidays should have happened on one of their dates, they can still congratulate themselves with a-very successful meeting.

Chamade, by, Uhlan, won the Warwick" Farm Handicap on Saturday last. - Gold Lace has been withdrawn . from the Wellington Cup, and Penates from the Telegraph Handicap. , Mahutonga, the' Auckland Cup winner of 1904, was brought back to Auckland on Sunday last after a long absence in New South Wales. Prince Leo followed up his Whan-, aarei Cup victory by winning the Park Handicap on the second day of the meeting. Peregrine was again runner-up. The most successful horses in England last,year were : Bayardo,-3yrg>. lluwins, £24,797»; Minqru, Syrs, 6' . wins, £15,246 ; Neil Gow, 2yre, - 4i wins, £10,306; Phaleron, 3yrs, # 6 wins, £9684 ; Lemberg> 2yrs, 6 wins, £9360 ; Dark wonala,, 4yrs, 3 wins, £7104, ' ■

Soultline is pleasing the turf critics in India. 1 The Wellington Cup is set down to be run on Saturday, the 22nd inst. It,is expected that Master .Soult will be Seen racing again in the Autumn. * ,' Celtic has recently been <nven\his first lessons over the schooling hurdles, and has shaped well. It is stated that Bobrikoff and , Downfall are alhaost certain to be taken * to Australia for Autumn events. ' A C.J.C. Champagne Stakes winner, Count Witte, was engaged in the Flying Stakes of 10 soys: at the Amun Meeting. First-rate nominations have been, received for the Takapuna Jockey. Club's Summer Meeting, which opens on the 29th inst. (Anniversary Day). The New Zealand Trotting Association has decided to offer a reward of £50 for information leading to the conviction of the "nobbier" of the trotting horse Rothschild Junior. The totalisator investments for the three days of ;the Auckland Trotting Club's Summer Meeting amounted to £14,806, jdst (short of the £14,838 of last season's Bookmakers' fees, however, amounted to £672, as against £609..: , The prospective chance of Gold Seal in the Liverpool Grand National Steeplechase, for which he is being grepared, does not appear very right, Home reports being, to the effect that he is not doing particularly well. Ponies are getting scarce in Auckland. There are three pony events in the Shore Summer programme, and the biggest entry of the three is only nine, this number including the few ponies which have been recently running most prominently. The annual race meeting of the Ohaupo. Racing Club takes place on Wednesday next, 19th inst., when an attractive f programme of seven events will be given. The programme includes the Ohaupo Cup, of 20 soys., two trotting-events of 20 soys. each, and several short distance events. . Miss Stella's victory in the Christmas Handicap at Alexandra Park on the second day of the Auckland Trotting Club's Summer Meeting was set down as rather flukey, on account of the accident which befel some of the more fancied section of- the field. She won again, however, on Saturday last, and won handsomely, though her following was a very meagre one. There appeared little reason to conclude that Elysian's breakdown in the G.N. Derby robbed him of the northern blue riband. His breakdown was unfortunate, and of a piece with the ill hick that has attended the owners of this good three-year-old since his return to headquarters. But there would require to be no doubt as to his condition, as there is none as to his quality : for him to be credited with the ability to beat Kilwinning on Derby Day. sit appears that Sir George Clifford had his doubts about Kilwinning, crediting him with the hall mark; of brilliancy up to a mile, but questioning his usefulness over any farther distance. : Kilwinning would appear therefore-to have been out to make the pace in the.G.N. Derby, and a nice pacemaker he was ; but, runlooked for 'and happy result his. owner, he not only outpaced, but outstayed his field, and even snatched victory from his stable mate. The essence of sport is embodied in a match, and a lot of interest centred in that between Wind Flower and Pieman, for £200 aside, at Liverpool. (Eng.) on Nov. 13. The matching of the pair was (says an exchange) the i outcome of their race m the Wavertree Selling Plate recently, when, at even weights, Pieman was beaten a couple of, lengths by Wind Flower, the pair finishing behind. Honolulu. On Saturday, Maher was substituted for Wm. Griggs on Pieman, but the American jockey's services failed to, reverse the running, and, again meet-, ing on lfevel terms and over the same distance as on Wednesday, Wind Flower onoe more scored (by two lengths.

, Ringdove, winner of >the , rapa Cup, started %, strongs favour-\3 ite. -. ' '' .? " ' *.Vj Killaloo, by Kilcheran, won'both"/; juvenile events at the Summer Meeting. "* | ' Bobrikoff and Downfall have been 4 entered for the leading events of / the Autumn Meeting at Randwick. ; -1 Ringdove's Wairarapa- Cup victory marked J. R. Franks's first success >' ' sirice he took charge of the Graslea ,v stables. > ' Polymorphous, winner of the Mana- " watu Sires' Produce Stakes, was pur-. 1 chased by. "Mr Highden*' for s 500gs. as a yearling. The seat of the trouble with ' Elysian is the sheath of the tendon, in -- one of the forelegs, and it is yet v doubtful how serious the injury will < prove. Waipaku, who won the Ashhurst * Cup, won the same event last , season, in both instances leading", from start to finish, whilst in the year." previous to her first win, she' led until the last furlong and finished, second. -'■,'"; Only five horses/started in the Whangarei. Cup—Prince Leo, Peregrine, Castle JSlaney.,' Kremlin and Ltiscombe. Prince Leo, who was m a hot favourite, won, and Peregrine and Castle Blaney finished respectively second and third. During the-holiday racing, most of .the olubs racing experienced a decreased totalisator turnover. Auckland stands out as an exception ill this respect. On the other hand, there has been a pretty general increase in the number of bookmakers operating. The strong backing of Elysian in. the Summer Cup, and again in the G.N, Derby, argued that backers were hard put to it to find a favourite, for there appeared good reason in the training. work to look elsewhere for a winner. But the glory of his Riccarton form seemed too strong a light for the judgment of the wary. At the Wairarapa Summer Meeting, Full Rate, who won the Reynolds Handicap under Bst. 51b on'the' opening day, was handicapped with ' 9st. 111b in the Russell Handicap on the second day, for which latter event he was fancied as a certainty. -< Sunbonnet, however, won by a head < from Warlock, Full Rate finishing a head behind Warlock. The six furlongs was run in 1.15 1-5. When owners, gifted with time and' leisure to study closely the distinctive qualities of their stable inmates, fail as often as they do to prove the correctness of their estimates, how little chance has the ordinary backer to, solve the ever-recurrent problem P- 1 Hence the growing tendency .to ignore form (more or less) and, calculating that in an essentially uncertain > game the line of least uncertainty is the best to follow, take the cue from stable fancies and followers. The Wairarapa Cup; won by the Messrs Stead's Ringdove, wsb an exciting race, and furnished one of < the closest possible finishes. Tumut, who made the running for,, about' seven furlongs, proved to have only a sprinter's, chance, but he helped the pace. Ringdove came into play entering the straight, Merrivoma and Merrie Zealand, the place-get-ters, disputing the ground inch ' byinch.' A great fight resulted m a half-head victory for Ringdove, with Merrie Zealand third* a neck behind; Merrivonia. f The jockey problem here is one of, , the most, diffloult ' questions the, authorities face ; indeed, it seems as if they were powerless (remarks a New York scribe). Day after day the genuine sporting writers openly, denounce many of the leading jockeys for careless,, reckless, and practically fraudulent riding, but no action, is taken in the matter. A§ Mr J. R. Keene, vice-chairman of the Jockey Club, once said ; They s are hopeless ; they get into bad hands and become unmanageable. \ After all, it v is extraordinary, when-.* •one comes to think, of it, that a clever-, " boy will throw'in his lot 1 with aerookt/ in preference to a wealthy, legitimate -v owner, but experience proves tnati ; such is the oase.

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Permanent link to this item

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Bibliographic details

CAP AND JACKET, Observer, Volume XXX, Issue 18, 15 January 1910

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1,713

CAP AND JACKET Observer, Volume XXX, Issue 18, 15 January 1910

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