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THEY SAY

— That the latest earthquake shocks at Wakatane were kept dark. — That young Mick Walsh does not believe in the cold water cure. — That ehe seats in Cornwall Park would be all the better for backs. — That J. W. Taylor has secured a completely new rig-out — barring the boots. — That A. Sanford and the Hermit of Tiri Tiri are uot on speaking terms. — That there is much friendly feeling between the morgue and the tram office. — That some of the new hats at the races almost frightened the nags off the course. — That the coloured gentlemen of Auckland are putting on airs since Mr Johnsing's victory. — That the old home at the Opera House isn't what it used to be since John Hamer left for Dunedin. — That everybody will be pleased to hear that genial Captain Norbury is steadily improving iv health. — That John Fuller is receiving countless compliments on the appearance of his JNoo Yahk bat. — That the episcopalian section of the Worms will soOn return to the ways of humdrum respectability. — That some of the dark horses that are to be run for the Licensing Committee will sui prise people before they are finished. — That the state coalmining business is not all that fancy painted it. The good old railway is the working bullock as usual. — That the latest style in lady's hats is a great auxiliary to spooning operations. You can't see what goes on underneath 'em. — That Tom Brown is willing to take Jack Johnson on at any time. Brown versus Black should provide an interesting contest. — That the silence maintained by the Lib. Labs, just now is ominous. Is it not rather the natural effect of Christmas merrymaking? — That the claims of William Johns should not be lost sight of when the next appointments to the Upper House are under consideration. — That a hideous rumour Hew round town last week to the effect that Paul Hansen had shaved his moustache off. Luckily there was nothing in it. — That the high returns of butter fat are resuming their ascendency over the mind of Wesley Spracg, and smoothing out the electoral wrinkles. — That the cattle truck saloons on the race trains this season were a trifle less comfortable than ever before. Why not try sheep trucks for a change .? — That it pays to be a candidate for Parliament nowadays. Even if defeated, you are always sure of a substantial purse of sovereigns from sympathisers. — That some of tbe punters came down with a dull sickening thud at Ellerslie on Saturday. There is no money in backing horses at the odds demanded last week. — That it is high time the Government provided overalls for the protection of those unfortunate individuals who, on race days, have to travel through the Newmarket tunnel in cattle trucks.

again !

—That White Cross Bligh has got Buckley's chance of getting that billet. — That the Sea Serpent has be^n seen off Gisborne. Them mince pies again ! —That th« suburlian wine industry is brink What about those black cameras ? — That a judgeship will probably be offered to a well-known Auckland politician. — That Wellington is a little bit jealous of Auckland's rapid increase in population. — That the holiday budget of accidents, fires and suicides is quite up to the average. — That the dust fiend laughs at the puny efforts of hydrant, water-cart, and sprinkler. — That Herr Wagner's little homily on marriage in the " Prince of Pilsen" has "caught on." — That the Labour Department has a way of rewarding those whom Labour in revolt discards. — That the number of A. J. Black's disciples is getting small by degrees and beautifully less. — That the man who looks at his watch during sermon time at Northcote runs a fearful risk. — That the inquiry into the little affair of fisticuffs at the Epsom trotting meeting may have unexpected results. — That the Government stroke was very much in evidence among the lumpers round the Morayshire on New Year's Day. — Tbat Mrs Neligan will have to answer some questions from the " overworked" women of Auckland when she returns. — That there was quite a boom in Christmas picnics) on the coast beyond the Waitakereis. Ah, those dear delightful little rocky nooks ! — That the daily papers are keeping a vigilant eye on the scions of British nobility at present visiting tbe Dominion. Donne is doing ditto. — That the Government has now an excellent chance to prove the value of the Life Insurance Department in connection with the miners of the Dominion. — That the theory and practice of the daily papers are strikingly at variance in respect of the JohnsonBurns fight. Not a gruesome detail is withheld. — That there has been something like a revival of the old time enthusiasm for cricket in Auckland during the holidays. . More power to the enthusiasts ! — That Dave Ingram is lookingextra happy just at present, and an interesting matrimonial event is set down to take place in tbe near future. Cause and effect again. — That the Hon. Thomas Thompson is instructing son-in-law Adolph Kohn in the noble art of politics, and that there is every possibility of Adolph contesting a seat at the next election. — That the sigh of relief expressed when the Cabinet secret was revealed pulsated all over the colony like an earthquake shock. The suspense was, as Silas \A egg would say, Terremenjious. — That it would be much better to have the tramcar windows frosted than semi-transparent. It wouldn't be a bad idea to turn the sprinkler on them. It doesn't seem to be of much nse onthe roads — That wee Davie Goldie waa a whale among the minnows at the Sunday school picnic in the Domain on New Year's Day. ' Davie in his shirt sleeves was all over the place, and' his score at rounders broke all records. *

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TO19090109.2.9

Bibliographic details

THEY SAY, Observer, Volume XXIX, Issue 17, 9 January 1909

Word Count
964

THEY SAY Observer, Volume XXIX, Issue 17, 9 January 1909

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