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AUCKLAND CITY.

Crowther, Hobbs, Napier the Best

Ticket.

Say what we will, we must confess that William Crowther has been one of the few who bave sturdily fought for us through thick and thin. -- Also, he has been independent of party, opposing the Government in extravagant expenditure and extreme legislation, and supporting them in every proposal for the true welfare of the country. We cannot spare Mr Crowther. He is honest and straightforward, qualities usually lacking in our politicians, and he has a vigorous turn of speech which may not be polished, but is nevertheless effective. There is neither wane of backbone nor inconsistency about Mr Orowther. He knows his own mind, and speaks it without any backing and filling.

What a contrast to Mr Holland, the flabby gentleman with the consistency of a lemon jelly, who \b invariably asleep when the interests of Auckland are at stake. Mr Holland's strength lies in the fact that he is all things to all men. He never displeases anybody. ' What has Mr Holland said that yon can object to ?' asked one of bis canvassers the other day. ' Said 1' was the prompt reply, ' that is my objection to him ; he has said nothing Bince he went into the House.' ' Then what has he done V ' Nothing whatever,' the other man retorted. 'If he had done anything I would give him my vote.' That sums np Mr Holland to a nicety. He has said nothing; he has thought nothing ; he has done nothing! he has simply fawned at Dick Seddon's heels since he became a member. What use is he, then, to Auckland?

Fifty times better elect Mr Napier, who knows his own mind, and is able to express it. Mr Napier is a born orator, he has more energy than any ordinary half-dozen

of our members, and he hasgiven us a taste of what he can and would do by the great things he has accomplished on the Harbour Board. Look at the points he scored for us in the matter of Admiralty House, look at the book-keeping and other reforms in tho Board's administration, look at the progressive works now being carried oat on the wharves and jetties, look at his recent exertions in the matter of the San Francisco service and Calliope Dock, look at Freeman's Bay recreation ground, and then Bay whether he would not be a first-class, hustling member of Parliament. We want good men in the Honse. Mr Napier is one of the cleverest and most progressive public men we have had in Auckland, Let us send him to represent us in Wellington.

So far as Mr Hobbs is concerned, there can be no two opinions that he would make an excellent member. He was one of the best of our representatives in the Housß for a great many years, honest and conscientious, and fully alive to the interests of this part of the colony. Being a man of independent means, Mr Hobbs is free altogether from mercenary motives, and in no way self-seeking. The £240 per annum is no consideration to him. He retired from politics years ago by his own desire, though his seat was the safest in the country, and he would have kept out of politics altogether if the administration of affairs had been to his satisfaction. But, realising that there is great work to be done in the cause of good government and economical administration, he has come forward and placed his veteran services at the disposal of the electors once more. There is work for Mr Hobbs to do in Parliament. It is creditable to his patriotic instincts, as a native New Zealander, that he is willing to do it. Let us elect him in order that the work may be done.

Next to these three, we prefer Mr Fowlda. We like him because he has the courage of his convictions, whether they are palatable to the electors or not. Many a man would have abandoned his single tax policy altogether, seeing it was unpopular, but not so with Mr Fowlds. He has even ventured to speak out in defence of the Anstrian invasion, and though we do not agree with him on thia poinc, we appreciate his courage We admire his free trade principles, however, and here again he is not afraid to speak his mind, even though he knows that free trade wi.'.l not go down with the working classes in a community whose manufacturing industries are bolstered np by a high protective tariff. However, if Mr Fowlds should be elected he will make an excellent member f though, as we have said, we prefer Crowther, Hobbs, and Napier.

Mr Baume has made much ground in popular estimation by his excellent and effective speaking. Soonor or later, Mr Baume will win a seat in the House, hut his time is not just yet. Moreover, when he doeß win it, he owes it to himself to reserve more freedom of conscience than he has allowed himself in this contest. He has tied himself almost as tightly to the heels of Seddon and party as Mr Holland has done. Mr Baume has force of character - he should insist upon his own independence.

Of the two labour candidates, Messrs Regan and Rosser, Mr Regan is the one who is most entitled to the votes of the labour party. He has largely devoted his time and abilities to the interests of trades unionism, and, besides organizing many unions, he has appeared before the Conciliation Court again and again, and fought the cause of the men with skill and determination. We are not aware that Mr Kosser has done anything fcr the trades unionists to justify him in claiming their support. So far as Mr Vaile is concerned, we feel that he is being sacrificed to party, simply to destroy the third Opposition vote. It was unfair to him to ask him to come out after people had become partizans and at such a late period of the contest that Mb success waß impossible. Mr Vaile is too good and too self-sacrificing a man to be need in this way.

It was thought at first that Mr Qninlan was not sincere in his candidature, bat be has settled any doubts on this point by his nomination and by the issne of an excellent address to the electors. Mr Qainlan claims to have a strong following Behind him.

These, then, are the candidates from whom the electors have to choose. The field is stronger in numbers than in

ability, but it nevertheless includes some first-class material. There should, however, be no difficulty in choosing the beet three men for Auckland. They stand ont conspicuously by reason of their honesty, moderation and capability. They are Meßsrs Orowther, Hobba and Napier.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TO18991209.2.5.2

Bibliographic details

AUCKLAND CITY., Observer, Volume XVIII, Issue 1093, 9 December 1899

Word Count
1,134

AUCKLAND CITY. Observer, Volume XVIII, Issue 1093, 9 December 1899

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