Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

SOCIAL SPHERE

Deab Eose, — We have been having a great deal of musical talent in Auckland. The Italian Company was splendid, but they would have been better patronised had they been in opera, as people as a rule do not care so much for that style of concert The present Comic Opera Company occupying the Opera House are likely to have crowded houses. The ' Gondoliers ' (their only piece at present) is splendidly staged, and all the performers are thoroughly good and have voices, which is more than can be said of most companies. Amongst the audience I noticed Mr and Mrs Brcham, Mr and Mrs Dignan, Mrs Herbert Thompson, Dr. and Mrs Wilkins, Mr and Mrs W. Philson and others.

The day was very fine for the races. The meeting was small, but very enjoyable. No one wore anything particularly smart, as the season is too early. Mrs W. Bloomfield, in soft grey cashmere and silk, with hat and feathers to match, looked well ; Mrs Ware in a handsome black silk ; Mrs Morrin in a beautifully-fitting costume of black, white vest, black hat and pink tips ; Mrs Deniston in a pretty grey tweed and a becoming bonnet ; Miss lawford, a tweed skirt and enat, blouse bodice; the Misses Firth, black costumes ; the Misses Wilkins looked neat in dark skirts with the new Eton coats, pretty blouses and sailor hats ; Mrs Armitage looked handsome in black, with heliotrope silk bodice and Eton coat ; Mrs Buddie in black ; the Misses A. Kerr- Taylor, in grey. Miss F. Mair looked pretty in fawn with green velvet ; Mrs Arthur Taylor, in a china blue flowered costume ; Miss Pearce, in a beautifully- fitting grey tweed, looked well. There were some of the Opera Company present. , There is a talk of a Hunt Club ball being given. I don't quite know when it is to come off. It should be a good one, as the Hunt has been so popular this year. I hope every one will turn up to make it a thorough success. Mr and Mrs Thome George are giving a small dance at their house in St. Stephen's Avenue this week. I don't hear of any other gaieties coming off at present. The weather is getting so warm that the tennis clubs will all be stirring themselves about their opening day. The courts ought to be in splendid condition this year. It has been such a good growing season, the oaks in Government House grounds are beginning to look lovely, and we are looking forward to the house being occupied very shortly. At last the Union Steam Company are rousing themselves to consider the comfort and convenience of the travelling public. They have been a long time waking up, and we have to thank the advent of the new company, Huddart, Parker and Co., for it. What a treat it will be to travel in those splendid new steamers ; the Union boats will look very small beside them. I expect a great many Australians will take advantage of these large, fast new steamers to visit New Zealand this summer. Yours ever, Violet.

The last but one of the series of Ponsonby Socials took place on Friday evening, when the attendance was even larger than ever. Excellent music, excellent partners, and an exceptionally nice supper contributed the essentials of a most enjoyable evening, and it goes without saying that the dance was a great {success. The ladies present included Mrs Eees and Mrs Hanna, both of whom looked well in black COBtumes ; Mrs Bartlett, heliotrope gown ; Miss Billington, rich black satin and lace ; Miss C. Billington, white muslin, white and scarlet cloak : Misses Bastard looked nice, one in pale blue satin, and the other in pale pink satin ; Miss Rees, very pretty sapphire net gown ; Miss N. Eees looked charming in pale pink, trimmed with gold, beautiful white bouquet ; Miss Dickey, white gown, with white gauze trimmings ; MissHackett, stylish cardinal

satin and net ; Miss Brodie looked pretty in black net, trimmed with jet ; Miss Gilmer, black satin dress ; Miss Davies, pale blue cachemire ; Miss Knight, black, relieved with scariet ; Mrs C. Campbell, rich black satin ; Miss Yates looked nice in pale pink; white silk sash ; Miss Court, pink cachemire and roses : Miss F. Court, very pretty white net frock ; Miss Short, creme and wine costume ; Miss L. Short, very dainty white dress ; Miss Wright, yellow, draped with black net ; Miss Came, black, veiled with pale pink net. The final dance takes place a fortnight hence, and should be the best of the season.

Tho dance given by Mrs Upton at her residence, Shelly Beach Eoad, Ponsonby, last Thursday evening was a veiy_ enjoyable one. The function was a fashionable one,' and there were a large number of guests present. A pretty effect was secured by lighting the grounds with fairy lamps. Mrs Upton, wore black silk ; Mrs Gorrie, black, relieved with white; Mrs Dr. Lawry, white silk ; Mrs Edwards, pale pink ; Miss Johnstone, grey relieved with white; Miss Upton, white; Miss Gorrie, pale pink ; Miss M. Gorrie, pale green ; Miss Buckland, black, pale blue ribbons ; Miss M. Buckland, rose pink ; Miss Buckland, grey; Miss Laird, green; Miss Langsford, black ; Miss Tole, scarlet and black ; Miss Devore, black and scarlet ; Miss Masefield, vieux rose silk ; Miss Macindoe, black and amber ; Mips Pierce, amber gown ; Miss Batger, black velvet ; Miss A. Cameron, white, amber sash ; Miss Hesketh. white; Miss Phillips, white ; Miss Dixon, amber ; Miss Bice, grey.

Miss Marie Stefani (Dolly Stcphenson) writes from London that she is doing excellently well, and is singing in conjunction with the best vocalists, and that Lady Onslow has been very kind to her. Miss Stefani is an old pupil of Prof. Schmitt.

Mr and Mrs E. E. Bannister gave a very enjoyable party at their residence, Sussex Square, Wellington, on Friday, 9th inst. The room was very prettily decorated with ferns, flags and fairy lamps, and a large streamer with the word ' Welcome' was suspended overhead from side to side. A long programme of dances was gone through with great zest, and songs were given in the intervals by Miss Grady, and Messrs A. F. Hill, Beachroft, Clothier and Young, and Mr Chambers contributed a recitation. The evening, which was thoroughly enjoyed by all present, was wound up by the singing of ' Auld Lang Syne.' The hostess was attired in a pretty cream costume, with black velvet ribbon stripes and lace chiffon ; Miss Bannister was in white ; Miss M. Bannister, pink ; Mrs Bishop, a handsome dress of black marveilleux ; Miss Bishop, white with blue ribbons ; Mrs Tabuteau, cardinal satin, with lace front ; Mrs Davies, navy blue flowered silk ; Miss Davies, cream delaine ; Mrs Gordon, black and cardinal ; Miss Dunnett, black net ; Mrs Pettit, black silk ; Miss Pettit, cream delaine; Miss B. Pettit, white ; Mrs Grady, black silk ; Miss Grady, while satin ; Miss E. Grady, pink nun's veiling ; Miss Lachman, maize trimmed with black and velvet ; Miss G. Lachman, white ; Miss Walter, pink cashmere; Mrs Chambers,- cream casbmere, Miss Steele, pink crepe delaine ; Mrs Eowe, dark green velvet, maize ribbons ; Mrs Woods, black silk trimmed with lacs ; Miss Molloy, heliotrope silk, white chiffon ; Mrs Edwards, black lace trimmed with white satin ; Mrs Remington, black and gold ; Mrs Atack, gobelin blue merveilleus trimmed with fawn silk lace; Mrs Laehman, pink net; .Mrs Poynton, black, with pale blue fisherman's net ; Mrs Duff, black velvet ; Miss Eoss, pink satin ; Mrs Wise, coral pink •nun's veiling trimmed with green ; Miss Eigg, pale blue , Mrs W. Curtis, black, with pale pink chiffon ; Mrs Hyde, black lace, cardinal chiffon ; Mrs Bonthorne, pale green.

The following night (Saturday), Mr and Mrs Bannister gave a large juvenile plain and fancy dress party in honour of the birthdays of Master Monty and Miss Ethel Bannister. Although it was a wretched evening, about 150 were present, and the little folk seemed to enjoy themselves to their hearts' content. During the evening, Mr Beachroft gave a song and the Misses Curtis a duet. Amongst the fancy costumes were the following : — Miss E. Bannister, Morning Showers; Miss M. Bannister, Minnie Palmer ; Miss E. Pettit, Polish Lady ; Miss Hyde, Fairy ; Miss Tabateau, Fairy; Miss Gordon, Butterfly; Miss Bishop, Japanese Lady;

Miss Ida Blundell, Little Bopeep ; Miss Atack, Little Bopeep ; Miss Fowler, Ivy ; MiS3 L. Pettit, Red Eiding Hood ; Miss Davis, Eed Riding Hood ; Missß. Steele, Evening Star; MissTabateau, Oriental Lady ; Miss Buttle, Dolly Varden ; Miss B. Beauchamp, Flower Girl ; Miss L. Duff, Winter Snow ; Miss M. Duff, Buy a Broom ; Miss N. Mills, Gipsy; Miss V. Mills, Spanish Lady; Miss Kate Nichols, Kate Greenway ; Master M. Bannister, Master Geo. Bannister, Master F. Steele, Tennis ; Master S. Bannister, Miller ; Master Fowler, French clown ; Master J. Blundell, Irishman (best costume in room) ; Master H. Blundell, Prince Charming ; Master Woods, Boy in Blue ; Master Woods, Court dress : Master J. Rogan and Master Rose, Cricket ; Master King, Sailor ; Master Inglis and Fancourt, Eton College Boys ; Master Morshead King Henry VIII ; Master Atack, Little Lord Fauntleroy ; Master ßonthorne (two years old), Folly; M.C.'s, Master R. Steele, Mr Jones from London, and Master J. Steele, Mr Smith from New York, and a great number in evening dress.

The Governor, Lady Glasgow, two young sons and Captain Clayton, A.D.C., were present at the Canterbury — Wellington football match.

Much praise is duo to the Wellington Amateur Opera Company fur the splendid manner in which they staged and acted ' Bip Van Winkle.' On Friday and Monday nights very large audiences witnessed the performances. A large party from Government House were present on both occasions, and seemed to thoroughly enjoy themselves. Lady Glasgow wore a very handsome and stylish crimson satin with black lace, angel sleeves and trimmings ; Miss Hallowes, black] lace dress and handsome slato cloak ; Ladies Boyle, pale pink frocks, white chiffon trimmings. # # #

It used to be a well-observed point of etiquette in Wellington theatres that at the conclusion of a performance, the members of the dress circle audience would remain standing in their places till the Governor and his friends had got away in comfort. Of late years the custom has gradually dropped, with the result that the vice-regal party are not infrequently to be seen struggling in the crush towards dressing-rooms. Surely the liaub ton of the Empire City can restrain impatience to get away, in order to pay such a trifling courtesy to the Queen's representative.

The Parisian woman is going in for things hand-painted. Her gowns are decorated with hand-painted flowers, and the vest which she dons with her walking costume is the background of a choice artistic effect. One of the eccentric young women whose chief object in life is to have • something new,' painted flies all over her white percale vest, and wore it with innocent satisfaction. Hand-painted pocket books are numerous, and, of course, the hand-painted fan is more conspicuously to the front than ever.

The prettiest wedding seen in Wellington for a longtime was that of Miss Grady, who was united at the Terrace Congregational Church, last Thursday, to Mr Richard McCallum, barrister and solicitor, of Blenheim, and a member of the Borough Council. Miss Grady, ■who is the eldest daughter of Mr Frank Grady, a highlyrespected resident of Wellington, is the possessor of a magnificent voice, and is well known in musical circles in the Empire City. Both she and her parents are deservedly popular, and the attendance was so large that at least two hundred people— many of 'them personal friends — were unable to obtain admittance to the commodious church, where the bride has worshipped so lone:. The weather was beautiful, and if there is anything in the saying that ' Happy is the bride whom the sun shines on ' Mrs McCallum should feel highly gratified. The Rev. Mr MeAra, of Kaikoura, who only arrived shortly before the service, having missed a steamer at Lyttelton, tied the knot, and was assisted by the Rev. G. J. Allen, 8.A., pastor of the Terrace Congregational Church. The bride, who has been liberally endowed by Nature, looked exceedingly pretty in a dress of pale creme merveileux, with a large veil, embroidered in a design of lilies of the valley, and a wreath of orange blossoms and lilies of the valley. She also wore a handsome ruby bracelet, the gift of the bridegroom. Her attendants were Miss Ethel Grady (her only sister), and Misses Mary and Maggie

McCallum (sisters of the bridegroom) , each of whom wore a pretty soft creme dress with a short train, the trimming being silk and ribbons, and a creme hat with ostrich feathers. Each of the young ladies also had a gold bangle, set with pearls, presented by the bridegroom, and a choice bouquet of violets. The b^st man was the Rev. H. 0. Robb, of Blenheim. At the conclusion of the service, Mr Robert Parker, the well-known professor of music, who trained the bride's voice in former years, played the Wedding March in a masterly manner. An adjournment was afterwards made to the schoolroom adjoining, which was gaily decorated, and an At Home was held, about 150 being present. The health of the happy couple was duly proposed, and the bridegroom made a suitable reply. Songs were contributed by Mrs Parsons, Mr Prouse, Mr R. B. Williams, and a very pleasant afternoon was spent. At half-past five the newly-wedded couple left for Napier and Auckland via the Hot Lakes, en route for Australia. The wedding guests numbered nearly 250. # # •#

Miss Scott's Cinderella dance laet Thursday evening was a delightful one' There were about thirty couples present, and the gentlemen being in the majority, the programmes of the ladies were all filled, and they had a splendid time. Very pretty features of the gathering were the Highland reel and cotillion, which were skilfully and cleverly danced by the pupils. Amongst those present were the following : -Mrs Darby, as Colleen Bawn ; Miss Keane, as Madam Eeoarnier, looked exceedingly well;. Miss Larritfc was a pretty Dancing Girl ; Misses Dunningham and Armstrong were two charming Portias ; Misses Goldie, S. Dickey, McPherson and Campbell, as Highland Lassies, were a charming quartette ; Miss Campbell, Dancing Girl ; MissFarrell, evening dress ; Misses P. Court and M. Shortt, in fac simile costumes, but of different coloured roses, red and pink, looked very sweet ; Miss Court, 'Forget me-not ; Miss Dickey, charming black evening dress ; Mrs Hen rickson, pretty black evening dress of black satin and lace ; Miss Halstead and Miss Carr wore pretty costumes of ereme material ; Miss Annie Scott looked charming in a dainty white costume, pale blue sash ; Miss Scott, white costume, relieved with silver, angel sleeves of gauze.

Lady Glasgow has consented to become patroness of the Auckland Young Ladies' Orchestra, and looks forward with pleasure to the first performance on her arrival in Auckland.

The latest French hat is the most becoming thing of the season. It flare 3in the back and comes to an odd little point in the front. Between the sides of the point there is just room for the fluffy bang of the summer girl. The foundation of the hat is black guipure lace, with a narrow edge falling over the brim. A large bow of soft pale green ribbon forms the trimming. Each loop is studded with imitation emeralds and glossy jets. Wavy aigrettes tower above the loops of ribbon. They are resplendent with alternating rows of the emerald and iet.

The social in connection with St, Benedict's was an enjoyable one. Amongst the costumes worn on the occasion were the following ; —Miss Spinks looked well in pale green flowered silk, with coral pink trimmings ; Miss Brophy, very pretty pale blue' costume ; Miss Lynch, black lace, crimson fan ; Miss O'Sullivan, black costume ; Miss L. Spinks, pure white ; Miss Murphy, black satin and lace, handsome black fan ; Miss Wright, creme veiling ; Miss McOrae, pink veiling, very pretty ; Miss Keating, black and crimson ; Miss Hayes, black satin ; Miss Lucas, scarlet and black ; Miss L. Lucas, all black ; Miss Smyth looked nice in a pretty green dress ; Miss Good, crimson velvet and crimson fan, very becoming ; Miss O'Gara, pale blue ; Misses Cronin, both in black ; Miss Keenan, pale blue satin, her sister looked nice in pale pink liberty silk ; Miss French, pale blue and white ; Miss J. McGuire, white and pink trimmings ; Miss FitzPatrick, cardinal and white ; the Misses Kelly, black and pink.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TO18920924.2.8

Bibliographic details

SOCIAL SPHERE, Observer, Volume XI, Issue 717, 24 September 1892

Word Count
2,719

SOCIAL SPHERE Observer, Volume XI, Issue 717, 24 September 1892

Working