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THE ANGLO-RUSSIAN WAR.

RUSSIAN CRUISER AFRICA IN AUCKLAND. THE BABTKS LOOTED.

AWFUL PANIC IN THE CITY AND SUBURBS. y^~

Wiiest the Herald last. Saturday republished that stupid skit of D. M. Luckie's on, the imaginary visit of the phantom Russian cruiser " Kaskowhiski " to this port, howfew of the readers of that journal could have anticipated that the grim joke would in a few days be realised ? Many people were n mazed and shocked to see the Herald, which, claims credit for veracity and accuracy, and is the special organ of a religious body, lending its columns to such sensational and senseless twaddle as the Kaskowhiski story, which was so palpably fictitious, and so cleai-ly the production of a mere tyro in naval and military matters, as to deceive only a few nervous old women and imbecile men. "We, however, cannot too strongly deprecate the publication of canards of the Kaskowhiski description, which, by throwing ridicule on a matter of such momentous importance, tend to cause apathy and indifference, where there should be vigilance and energy. "Whatever may be the shortcomings of the Observer, we have never been guilty of such unseemly levity on subjects of so much seriousness and importance. In last week's issue, in an article headed "Colonial Contingents and Colonial Defence," we pointed out what would be the immediate effects of a Russian raid on Auckland. But how little we expected that our fears would so soon be realised. The Telephone extra, which was largely circulated yesterday, will have placed many people in possession of the main facts connected with the visit of the Russian cruiser Africa, but the following account by our special reporter, who was an eye-witness"!^ most of the occurrences he describes, Avill, nojj doubt, be read with interest, as it is much fuller and more accurate than any description yet given. Our reporter desires to express his acknowledgments to Captain Fenton, of the Devonport Naval Artillery, Captain Burgess, Chief Harbour-master, Chief Pilot Sainty, Mr L. D. Murdoch, R. W. Waddel, Esq., Mayor of Auckland, Major Shepherd, and many others for the information so kindly communicated to him. It will be remembered that after Mr Gladstone had declared the ultimatum of the British Government to the Court of St. Petersburg, pacific assurances were received from the Czar. But notwithstanding these assurances, the Russians continued to advance into Afghanistan, and their advance guard, under General Pepperyhotchsky seized Herat. It then became apparent that the object of the Russians was to gain time, in order to pour troops along the line of the Attrek into the Serakhs to seize Herat, the key of India, and command the passes of the Siah Koh, as a tete de pout to Kandahah and the Bolan Pass, with the river Indus as the objective. The Governor-General of India had been warned to make defensive preparations, and troops were rapidly concentrated on the frontier, which checked the Russian advance. Intelligence reached us by cable on Monday that war had been declared, and that a collision had occurred between the Russians and Afghans, but, owing to the apathy of the New Zealand Government, no adequate steps had been taken to resist invasion. A meeting of the Cabinet was held in Wellington on Friday, at which it was decided to order £102,000 worth of war material through Sir Dillon Bell, Agent-Greneral, to train 'So picked men of the Armed Constabulary in the handling of big guns, to organise torpedo corps, and to reorganise and re-arm the volunteer corps. But, alak^ these preparations, however well-nieantC were too late. A fatal sense of security had blinded the colony to its defenceless condition, which it has only now fully realised. It is said that a certain place which is unmentionable to ears polite is paved with, good intentions, and the same may now be said of New Zealand. The city has been in such a terrible condition of panic and excitement during the past week that many of our contemporaries have been compelled to suspend publication. In fact, at one time we felt doubtful as to our ability to coa^* tinue the Observer. Many of the printed had joined in the general stampede to the country, and we were left with only a faithful few to bring out the paper. Even Jnow the inhabitants have not recovered from the shock of the recent raid, and many of our most important industries are likely to be suspended for a time. "When the people of Auckland went to rest in fancied security last Wednesday night,

Tiow few anticipated the rude awakening that would startle them, on Thursday morning ! It seems, from a statement made in the hearing of our reporter by Lieut. Scheezekoffensky, that the Africa left Vladivostok, Victoria Bay, at the southern •extremity of Eastern Siberia, and after a passage of ten days, reached the Northern Ooast of New Guinea, where she arrived on the Ist instant. Thence she proceeded to the Solomon Islands, the New Hebrides, and New Caledonia, where a swift French steamer had brought secret telegraphic -despatches for the Africa. Having coaled at New Caledonia, the "Africa" left on the 13th, and came straight to Auckland, passing near the North Cape on the afternoon of the 17th, and arriving outside Rangitoto Heef during the night of the ISth. Strange to say, her presence on the Coast was not ■observed by the U.S.Co.'s s.s. Waihora, or any of the coastal steamers, and she was thus enabled to reach her destination unobserved. It is reported by cable, however, that H.M.S. Nelson was on the look-out for her, but missed her off the coast of- Northern Australia. The Arawata, which made a swift passage to Sydney, specially chartered by Governor _De Veaux, had also heard of the presence of the " Africa " at New Caledonia, but arrived too late to prevent the descent on our coasts. The look-out man at Tiritiri was the first to observe a strange vessel, hull down, • . steaming towards the western end of Rangi- ; toto. His suspicions were aroused by the ', fact of her lights being out, and he called | the Auckland telegraph office, with the i intention of communicating the information, but could get no response. It has since transpired that, through the treachery of a .Uussian spy who had been living at the North Shore, the telegraph had been cut, lie having received a cypher message from .•St. Petersburg warning him of the intended 'despatch of armed cruisers to New Zealand. This treacherous Muscovite, who passed for ..a German, had been on the look-out for .several nights on a hill near Long Bay in ■expectation of the arrival of a Russian ship. It is fortunate for him that he went away by the Africa, or the infuriated residents of the North Shore would have lynched him when Ms guilt became known. In the grey dawn of yesterday morniug, the 18th, Mr Stark, who is an early riser, •-descried from his observatory a strange vessel, with a man-o'-war rig, putting out two boats ■ opposite Long Bay. Turning his powerful telescope in that direction, he was horrified at seeing that the boats were manned by = soldiers, wearing the peculiar Russian ca]i>, and that each boat carried two field-guns. It has since transpired that these were 12-pounders •of long range, capable of throwing a shell '6000 yards. Mr Stark had no difficulty in identifying the invaders as Russians, as during his tour in Europe a year or two ago he ■visited St. Petersburg and Moscow, and liad frequently seen the Russian Marine Artillery, of which this was a detachment, ■consisting of about 50 men. Mr Stark .alarmed his neighbours, galloped to Devonport, and communicated the startling intelligence to Captain Fenton. Naturally the news created profound consternation at the North Shore. Captain Fenton, however, •endeavoured to muster the Devonport Naval Artillery, with a view to resisting the -Russian advance. Meanwhile the Africa had steamed up the •channel, and was rounding the North Head ibefore the Navals could man the 40-pounder .gun on that position. But even had the gallant Volunteers had time to muster at the point, they would have been utterly powerless, as the Africa had her guns run out, and, slowing her engir.es under the North Head, she put two more boats' crews .ashore, with 50 men and two more 12-----pounders, and, rushing up the hill with bayonets fixed, the Russians quickly secured the position. A portion of this detachment with one gun was sent to capture Mount Victoria, and in afew minutes the North Shore was dominated by the Russians, and any attempt to dislodge them would have been topeless, if not suicidal. From the flagstaff the ■enemy were observed making signals in the ■direction of Lake Takapuna. While these events were transpiring at Devonport, an extraordinary scene was being ■enacted at Lake Takapuna which shews how thoroughly the Russians were acquainted with the locality, and how carefully their plans had been matured. Bursting in on that picturesque district while the inhabitants were still slumbering, the Russians scattered •themselves over the country, leaving only a small detachment to man the guns, aud thundering at the doors with the butts of their rifles, requisitioned the residents for horses. Sir Frederick Whitaker, ■ and Messrs Brett and Hurst were among the principal sufferers, ■every animal Avhich was capable of carrying a liussian, or being harnessed to a gun, being hurriedly pressed into the service. Mr Hurst .strongly and indignantly protested against the outrage, and pleaded his personal friendship with Admiral Aslambagoff on the occasion of the former visit of the Africa as a protection from such insult, but the brutal Muscovites laughed at his remonstrances, .and coolly proceeded to sack his wine cellar, consuming the greater portion of his champagne. In order to pacify the brutes and ;avert further molestation, Mr Hurst made a peace-offering of his best brand of Walker's whiskey, but the Russian officer, Lieutenant Schwipenschoff contemptuously rejected the liquor with the remark, spoken in excellent English, that 'the; English xoortki was "very poor" stuff." 1 • ' '' • - '•■•■-•■' I

Amidst the general consternation of the residents of Lake Takapuna, the screaming of the ladies, many of whom were in hysterics, and the barking of dogs, the Russians quickly harnessed the horses to the guns, mounted, and galloped off towards Stokes' Point. The remarkable forethought with which the attack was planned is proved by the fact that the Russians had brought harness ashore on the gun-liinbßrs, and though for want of sufficient saddles and bridles many of them rode barebacked or with rope halters, they appeared to be as much at ease when riding at a gallop as so many Cossocks of the Don. Riding swiftly along the road they took up a position on the high ground at Stokes' Point, dismounted, unliinbered the two 12pr. guns, and pointed them at the city. By this time the Africa had anchored outside the man-o'-war ground, and had her guns also laid on the city. She was first observed rounding the North Head by one of the watermen, Harry Keane, who informed the "Water-police, and the news was quickly circulated in Queen-street, causing universal panic. In a few minutes all the livery stables were rushed, and hundreds of people were observed driving or riding in hot haste in the direction of Newmarket. Messrs Dignan and Co. were actually offered £100 down for a horse of any description by a terror-stricken captain of a vessel, but every horse in the stable had been let out. Many men were seen speeding away on bicycles, and even the milk caits were rushed. A crowd of people broke into the yards of Messrs Buckland and Hunter and Nolan, seized the horses, and dashed helter skelter up Queen-street. Hotelkeepers, shopkeepers, and jewellers hastily seized their money and valuables, and rushed away in the same direction, and there was a universal cry of ' ' The Russians ! The Russians !" At this stage the general terror was intensified by the loud ringing of the fire-bells. Superintendent Hughes and his men turned out quickly, but soon perceived that the danger to be apprehended was of another and far worse description. Meanwhile the Africa had manned twelve large boats, each carrying 25 men and a Gatling gun of the latest pattern, invented by Rear-Admiral Poppemoffsky, of Vladivostok. It should be mentioned here that she carried a double complement of officers and men, chiefly marines, had been specially refitted for predatory operations, and armed with the most modern artillery, gatlings, rifles, and other weapons, including torpedoes, of the terrible Blowitzkyhi invention, from the great Russian arsenal at Nicolaieff, on the Anioor river. Two boats pulled towards the railway wharf, and, the crews having landed and mounted the guns proceeded at the double to seize the magazine at Mount Eden. The other ten boats, with 250 men and ten gatlings, reached Queen's wharf, where the crews landed , mounted the guns, fastened on drag ropes, and advanced in splendid order along the wharf and up Queen-street, leaving 50 men and two gatlings to guard the wharf, so as to prevent their retreat being cut off in case of disaster. The column advanced in fours with fixed bayonets, and the Russian colours flying. The dismay in Queen-street increased ; Lhe crowd of spectators who had turned out at the first note of alarm, many of them in a state of deshabille — men in their shirt sleeves, women wearing curl-papers and loose dresses hastily donned — looking dazed and slumbrous ; and a few persons of both sexes in their night-dresses, fled up the street, or ran back into the houses. The Russians, apparently indifferent to the prevailing terror and excitement, marched on like a piece of machinery, keeping the centre of the street. Halting at the Colonial Bank, they dropped 20 men, and then marched on to the Bank of New Zealand, where 20 more were detached, while another 20 were posted outside the Bank of New South Wales. Simultaneously 20 men with a gatling gun marched to the junction of Queen and Shorthand streets, taking up a position commanding the approach from that direction. Then the remainder of the column moved forward as steadily and firmly as a flood, tide to Wyndham-street, where another 20 men and a gatling gun took charge of the thoroughfare and of the National. Bank. j Here a woman, who had beenterror-stricken, fell down in a fit on the footpath close to the Herald office, but a Russian officer promptly motioned to a doctor accompanying the Russian troops, and the poor creature was speedily restored to consciousness. The eagle eye of Admiral Aslambagoff had, however, noticed the bulletin board outeide the Herald office. Coolly crossing over to the footpath, he scanned the latest extra posted on Tuesday afternoon, the 17th, with news of the collision between the Afghans and Russians between Herat and Kandahar. The Admiral smiled grimly, and, calling for a file of men, entered the office, and shortly afterwards re-appeared with a copy of that morning's Herald. Simultaneously Mr liutchinson and the run- boys were observed making their exit by the Wyndham-street entrance and rushing frantically towards Albert-street. Admiral Aslambagoff rapidly scanned the telegraphic columns of the Herald, and handing it to his aide, ordered the column to resume its march. Just opposite the British Hotel our special reporter, who had dodged up Vulcan Lane and reappeared at Morrin's, was observed taking notes, but, at a signal from the Admiral, a rifle was pointed, at his head, and in a stern voice he was ordered to halt; Our special's first instinct was to make a

strategic movement to the rear in double quick time and seek shelter in the Police Station, but seeing that the Russian soldier had covered him with a loaded rifle, he considered discretion the better part of valour, and remained motionless. Fortunately for our special he had acquired a smattering of Russian, and having, according to his wont when on special duty, a flask "of E. and J. Burkes Dublin Three Star Old Irish whisky from the Governor Browne Hotel in his pocket, he tendered it as a propitiatory offering to the officer who advanced with a drawn sword towards him. To this lucky circumstance and his knowledge of a few words of Russian our special owes his life, and we are indebted for this report of the disastrous events of yesterday. A few words were exchanged between the officer and the Admiral, who received the flask, hastily drank the greater part of the contents, and, remarking with a friendly and patronising smile— "ltisc7iy Burkesky's loortky, Koppysky /" informed our special that he would be at liberty to accompany the column, and report the proceedings without any danger of molestation. Thus reassured, our reporter resumed his notes. Not so fortunate, however, was a juvenilelooking Star reporter, who, with a degree of impudence which was nothing less than suicidal, endeavoured to interview the Admiral, but was fatally spitted and held up on the end of a Russian bayonet, where he struggled ineffectually for a few minutes, and then expired with fearfully agonising groans. Having released the corpse from the bayonet, the Russian soldier coolly placed it under his arm and ransacked the pockets. An expression of disgusted disappointment and chagrin Stole over his bronzed and whiskered features when his search was rewarded by nothing more valuable than a quantity of newspaper cuttings, a pair of scissors, a paste pot, the stump of a pencil, a piece of blue ribbon, and a handful' of conversation lozenges. At this moment the column was ordered to resume Its march, and the Russian soldier dropped the inanimate body of the Star interviewer and brutally kicked it out of the way. At Victoria-street another gatling and twenty men were detached to seize the Union Bank of Australia and guard the approaches, while another section of 30 men with two gatlings proceeded to the Barrack Hill. An eye witness says the Russians appeared to be very much incensed when they observed the guns captured in the Crimea, which they at once rushed, dismounted and spiked. The main body, consisting of 50 men, with three gatlings and a field piece, which we omitted to mention further back, proceeded to the Junction, opposite the Clarendon Hotel, where 25 men were detached to seize the Drill Shed and the two guns of the A Battery of Artillery. The whole of these dispositions were made with a degree of skill and celerity which marked the perfection of the Russian plans and their intimate knowledge of the city. At this stage, Admiral Aslambagoff, accompanied by his staff, returned to the Bank of New Zealand, at the doors of which the marines thundered with their muskets. The caretaker was observed to hastily protrude his head from an up- stairs window, when he was sternly commanded to open the main door. Some delay ensuing, a number of soldiers beat in the doors with the butts of their rifles, and a rush was made for the strong room. The Admiral quietly proceeded to the Boardroom upstairs, and calmly lighting a cigar, gave a few concise orders to his Staff. Instantly an aide de camp ran to the detachment holding Wellesley-street, and a party of men were sent to Hobson- street to bring the Mayor, who ' shortly afterwards made his appearance between a file of Russian soldiers. His "Worship was accommodated with a seat in the Board-room, where meantime a Lieutenant had unearthed the Directors' private stock of liquors, which he placed on the table. Our reporter was invited by the Admiral to partake, and offered a cigarette, which he, of course, accepted. Meantime the Russian flag had been hoisted on the flagstaff. Mr Waddell was courteously received by the Admiral, and having imbibed a glass of the Directors' whisky to brace up his nerves, was addressed as follows : " Mr Mayor, you will be pleased to give me the names of your Communal Council, the bankers, and all the notables of your city." His Worship bowed politely, and writing a list of names, handed them to the Admiral, who passed them to an aide. Some time was then spent in a sdcial chat, with frequent applications to the whisky and cigarettes, after which the following gentlemen, looking very pale and downcast were ushered into the Board-room by the soldiers posted on the staircase : — The Hon. Jas. "Williamson, Chairman of Directors of the Bank of New Zealand; D. L. "Murdoch, Esq., General Manager; G. S. Kissling, Esq., Manager; J. Burton, Esq., Manager Colonial Bank ; J. H. Coates, Esq., Manager National Bank; C. B. Grierson, Esq., Manager Union Bank of Australia; and T. H. Ivey, Esq., Manager Bank of New South Wales. By some oversight His Worship had missed the Bank of Australasia and the Savings Bank. These gentlemen having been accommonated with seats, and invited to help themselves to the whisky, the Russian Admiral, in a speech which was remarkable for its politeness and brevity, demanded a levy of half a million cash, to be paid over within half an hour, with the alternative. of looting the

bank cellars and sacking the city. The expression of mingled grief and consternation, which this demand called up would have furnished a graphic picture for an artist. There was a whispered conversation among the assembled gentleman, who gathered in. . groups in the corners of the room, while the admiral took out his watch, helped himself to another whisky, and relit a fresh cigarette. At the end of the consultation, the Hon. J". Williamson, on behalf of the Directors of the Bank of New Zealand, offered as their share of the demand £100,000, in " bills and other > securities," which the admiral scornfully declined. Mr Murdoch then remarked that if sufficient time were allowed to telegraph to Wellington, Sir Julius Yogel might be induced to raise another loan through the Bank of New Zealand, bat this suggestion was also scouted by Aslambagoff, who grinned a sardonic grin. Mr Coates here observed that if any further loan was to be raised he thought it should be done by tender. At this stage of the proceedings several members of the City Council were ushered in, the Admiral glancing uneasily at the blue ribbons worn by Crs. Weymouth and Groldie. Another pause ensued. Aslambagoff looked at his watch, and smilingly remarked, "Well, gentlemen, time is getting on, and time, as you know, is money. I fear my men will be getting impatient. If you do nob soon make up your minds we shall be obliged to help ourselves. Haven't you English a proverb — ah ! yes — ' God helps those who help themselves.' " These remarks only increased the general dismay aiid irresolution, and another whispered consultation took place, Avhich ultimately resulted in something like a wrangle, the various bankers being unable to agree as to their respective quotas. Suddenly, however, the Admiral rose from his seat, and exclaiming, " Time's up, gentlemen!" inarched downstairs, aud issued a number of rapid orders to his staff. The scene that ensued baffles description. Iv a few minutes the cellars and strong rooms of the Banks were sacked, and the Russians were seen proceeding towards the wharf laden with bags of money and armsful of bullion, several trucks and wheel-barrows being pressed into the service. From the Banks the Russians proceeded to the jewellers' shops, Messrs Alexander, Bartlett, Kohn, and Lewisson being the principal sufferers. Barnefct's pork shop and the Union Oil, Soap, and Candle Company were also sacked by the hungry soldiers, who devoured the stock with evident relish, to the great disgust of Mr Batger, who was quickly drawn from his place of concealment by the deplorable havoc committed. At this critical juncture the Salvation Band, headed by Messrs Larkins, C. O. Davis, Boynton, J. Newman, and several other pious citizens marched down Wakefield-street with colours flying. The Russians promptly stood to arms, but when the band struck up were seized with a temporary panic, and stuck their fingers in their carp. Quickly recovering, however, they pointed the gatlings at the advancing foe, causing- a disorderly flight. Lieut, liakerouesky informed our special that some of his men were only restrained from making prisoners of the hallelujah lasses by the extreme ugliness of the latter. Having looted the Banks and Insurance Offices, oilmen's stores, and principal business houses, the Admiral withdrew his forces in a very leisurely and orderly manner, re-embarked, and proceeded to the Africa without the loss of a man, the detachment at Stokes' Point being shortly afterwards brought off in the steam launch. The Africa was then coaled from the Kamo, Taupiri, and Waikato Company's yards, and the coal hulk Senator, and about noon she steamed round the North Head amidst the general execrations of thousands of spectators who had assembled to witness her departure. Having rounded the North Head and embarked the detachment stationed there, who brought away the 40-pr. Armstrong gun, the Africa steamed through the Rangitoto Channel with colours flying aud guns run out, and by 2 o'clock only a faint track of black smoke from her funnels was visible. on the eastern horizon. " It would serve no good purpose to prolong this melancholy description of the catastrophe that fell upon Auckland yesterday. It could only harrow up the feelings of the citizens of Auckland and intensify the universal grief and indignation at the insult that has been paid to the British nag, and the remorseless levy made on a defenceless city. Our own sorrow is too poignant for mere words. It is true we possess no shares or deposit in any bank, and therefore cannot feel the calamity so keenly as some of our fellow citizens (and, moreover, our head still aches from the effects of the directors' whisky) ; but for all that, we can deeply sympathise with the sufferers in their distress and bereavement. It will be some consolation to them, however, to reflect that there is a moral in this misfortune. Wisdom is often learned from adversity. Though our losses have been heavy, they are not irreparable. It is not even now too late to put the port into an efficient state of defence. ■ Let our leading capitalists and public men put their shoulders to the wheel (and their hands in their pockets — we mean their purses), and the harbour of Waitemata, so picturesquely tempting to a foreign spoiler, so lavishly rich in material resources and accumulated wealth, may speedily be rendered impregnable to the predatory and piratical incursions of any foreign.^ foe, our- citizen

•f sleep ; i& "peaceful security, without fear o liaviag their throats cut or their hard-earned gams ruthlessly torn from them by a barbarous invader. So mote it~be. LATEST PARTICULARS. Mr Horton, of the Herald, and Mr Leys, of the Star, endeavoured to bring out extras, but were prevented at the bayonet's point by the Russians, and each compelled to swallow the contents of several paste-pots. They both vow vengeance against the Russians for this indignity. The Observer and Telephone were the only journals allowed to issue an ext3-a, thousands of copies of which were circulated in the streets, and posted by Mr Wiseman on the Auckland and Suburban Bili Posting Companies' hoarding. Admiral Aslambagoff took away copies of both extras, printed on satin, which he intends to present to the Czar, to be hung up in the Art Gallery of the Winter Palace. VERY LATEST. Mr W. J. Hurst, at a meeting held at Pevonport, proposed to throw bone-dust in the enemy's eyes, as a defensive measure, but was overruled by Messrs Oliver Mays, H. H. Dudor, T. L. White, and Alison, who counselled a conciliatory course, and offered to present the Admiral with shares in the North Shore Ferry Company, which he civilly declined. VERIER LATEST. Mr John Lamb, at a meeting of the Har- ! bour Board (held in a coal cellar), proposed to open the proceedings with prayer, and by administering the pledge all round, but the ' proposition was rejected by Messrs Devore, McKenzie, and Reid, though strongly supported by Mr G. W. Owen. j The s.s. Triumph was furnished with a crew from the Africa and taken away as a prize. VERIEST LATEST. Mr Furby, the officer in charge of the Telegraph Station, endeavoured to telegraph for reinforcements to the Hon. P. Buckley, but the wires had been cut by the Russians. Dr Kenderdine, Mr. Hutchinson, and Mr Knight, of the City Council, are preparing a plan of defence with a torpedo system. It is also understood that Mr Pond is engaged in inventing a new kind of stink-pot, prepared from the main sewer gases, but the analysis is not yet complete. "Sphinx" is preparing an elaborate military criticism of the affair for the Herald. VERY VERIEST LATER LATEST. The volunteers have just mustered at the drill-shed. They unanimously declare they would have mustered sooner had there been any signal of alarm, or had they possessed uniform, and effective arms and accoutrements. Captain Daveney, who wears a Sphinxlike expression of countenance, bewails the loss of many dozen of champagne and salad oil from the Northern Club. Mr Flood, of the Auckland Club, deeply sympathises with him. VERY VERIEST LATEST LATEST. We stop the machine to announce that, after twenty thousand of this issue of the Observer had been printed off, the wretched fraud who penned the above has just rushed into the office in a frightful state of intoxication, and confessed that the entire story is a fabrication. He wants to lay the blame on St. Patrick's Day. We promptly brained him with a printer's mallet, and the editor's bull-dog is noAv engaged in chawing itp the last fragments of his vile corpse. Sic transit !

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THE ANGLO-RUSSIAN WAR., Observer, Volume 7, Issue 236, 21 March 1885

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THE ANGLO-RUSSIAN WAR. Observer, Volume 7, Issue 236, 21 March 1885

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