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CAP AND JACKET

MY NOTE BOOK,

By "Abiel."

" Tot homines, quot sententice."

The third horse in Ada Mantua's Autumn Handicap was drawn by an Auckland chemist. Who is really the owner of Eandwick, and where was that weight first faked up ? Old Lara ran in bandages on Monday, and seems a perfect cripple. In fact, there was a regular array of " crocks " in the Selling Eace. Joe (3-allagher won a pot of money over Louie's victory, and stood to win £500 on Catchem over the sticks. The Yattendon-Fanny Fisher filly is going to be a grand one. She has filled out wonderfully since Christmas, aud promises to be a real beauty. "Wild Dayrell will be heard of some day over country. He is a very nice jumper, and has any quantity of bone and power. The "McLean tartan" was immensely popular withe Scots, ye ken. I saw several old " burgoo jammers" take off their hats to the jockey of Louie even before she had won her race. The easy way in which Matau disposed of his field (all good ones) on Monday, in the Hurdle Handicap, says well for the strength of his reins at new year. What do you think ? Catchem is a grand jumper. He cleared his hurdles in a style we don't often see, and gained i a lot in every jump. Matau was too good for him, however. His race was a treat to witness. A subscriber asks : — " Was the stud horse Totara a success on the turf? 2. Have the colts Lillipee and Stirabout ever win on a race course ?" 1. He was never trained I believe. 2. I cannot find any record of their having done so. When is that law case coming on ? Surely a "divil's owner" can be found, who has sufficient disregard for his own character to take up the poor sufferer's cause, and lay into the Taranaki Jockey Club for stakes, costs, and damages. The Hippo-Slander filly had to rush up and beat Landseer in the Ellerslie Handicap, as the latter completely reversed the running of the previous day, with the Yattendon Fanny Fisher filly. Maid of Honor kinder opened the eyes of the Southern sporting scribes, " Soukar '' and " Spectator," and, indeed, of all visitors, as the people " below " thought Virginia Water could run rings j round anything here. There was a bit of alliteration about Wild DayrelPs arrangements, pleasing to the ear of J those who back such coincidences. The horse's name commences with the name of his trainer (Day), while the whole word rhymes Avith the jockey's name (Farroll) . Why in nature does not Mr Walters name some of his cattle ? It is positive cruelty to a sporting scribe to have to write so much in designating them. Ho might call the Fanny Fisher filly Caller Herring, and then the books could caLL-her-'erin for short. (If I'm erring in this joke I don't care, as I'm quite callous.) That grand son of a noble sire Navigator, by Eobinson Crusoe, out of Cocoanut, won the Australian J.C.s Champagne Stakes, for which he has been a hot favorite. The St. Leger Stakes was won by Wheatear, by Epigram-Wheatshcaf . The latter has been under a cloud, owing to an accident, but it would appear is quite recovered, judgement in urging the purchase of Anteros. Another thing wants doing badly at Ellerslie and that is the urinal in the paddock requires roofing in. At present it forms a grandstand for ali the larrikins on the course, and to any one possessing the least delicacy it is simply no con- j venience at all as it is impossible for such to make use of it while overlooked by a staring tribe of overgrown boys and, I am sorry to say, some men also. ( The Slander filly was in very sultry company on Monday. She looked perfectly pink, and is a regular beauty to look at, too, having furnished grandly since her clehut in Auckland ; but, somehow, she could not hang on to it long enough. She had a very good boy up, too (Hatfield), and he made the most of her, but the pace and company were too much. Mr Walters had backed her heavily, and put his friends on too. The grand races run on Monday in the Tradesman's Plate and Publicans' Purse, by Maid of Honor, prove conclusively that she is the best (bar, perhaps, Billingsgate) animal over short .courses in New Zealand. She galloped all the' •way without whip or spur, and won hands down each time. Her win in the latter event was a grand performance, giving weight to such tried performers as Virginia Water and Mischief. I wrote last week of the Easter Handicap, that So-and-so should run Ist, 2nd and 3rd, with *' Louie "for a saver. I mentioned Lone Hand third, and yet the "devil" set it vp — "Slander filly, Tim, and Lone Hand, with Lone Hand for a ' savier ' " (what ever that is). So I was barred from mentioning the winner even as a possible upset. The repetition of Lone Hand's name would prove that I wrote Louie. Harkaway is a wonderfully game little fellow. He was terribly overdone on Monday, and looked tucked up and dull ; and yet, with lOst 121bs on Ms, back (more than he ought to have been asked to carry, by-the-way), he ran into third place, beating such good ones as Te Whetu, to whom he gave 21bs, Harry Mount, level weights, Eakau and Wild Dayrell, to whom he gave 191bs each. His performance was, therefore, an exceptionally good one. It is to be hoped such carping critics as " Picador junior"' are now satisfied as to the ability of Anteros to get a winner. The rapid succession of such performances as Poet's, Louie's, Amazon's, Canard^ &c, prove that it was for want of opportunity only that the grandly bred Anteros did not ci>me> sooner, into favor as a sire. As soon as he is mated with good, and well-bred mares we L.av€*Buch perfect beauties as Louie as a result. '■-; Major vV^almsley is to be congratulated on his judg^mient ia urging the purchase'of Anteros. 'i'^'^hWM^&vl '.. '-."--. '. •>' '.-.. 'S' ' ■ ::' '. * ■ '■.'':'•. '■<,'<■::

Little King Quail ran a real game one for the Autumn Handicap, his gallop in the Easter no doubt did him good, and the pace not being fast suited him to aT. Williams rode him with good judgment. The Clerk of the Scales (Mr F. Marks) does not mean to have any sleight-of-hand tricks played on him. " Not me," says Fred. So he kept even the reporters of the dailies out of the enclosure, for fear they might have a spare cwt. or two in their pockets. Mr Marks' motto, "It is better to be sure than sorry," is very applicable ; and when no harm is done by his determination, ! he is perfectly right to carry it out. John Smith was exceedingly wrath with "Phaeton," of the Herald, for putting Kenilworth before the Maid in his tips, and saying the reason for his doing so was that she was a bit off. "Yer put Kenilworth before my mare do yer. Why if my mare was a bag o' bones, she could beat Kenilworth, she could !" Bravo, John, you give us a straight run for our money, whatever little faults you have; and you own the best mare in the Colony, bar none. How is it that though the telegraph wires were carried to the grand stand long enough ago, they are not utilized at all ; if a person wishes to send a message he must tramp over to the Ellerslie Station, half a mile away and then perhaps find the office closed. It would cost the Government very little to place an operator in charge of the Eacecourse Station and it would be a great convenience to the Press and public at large. The Takapuna Jockey Club have received excellent entries for their meeting to be held to-day (Saturday) . The acceptances are also satisfactory and, I may predict (should they be favored with fine weather) a large attendance, as it is the last meeting, with the exception of Papakura, of the season in Auckland, and racing men will have to bid long farewell to their much loved sport and get through the weary months intervening between this and next summer meeting as best they can. It is sincerely to be hoped that the weather will be fine, as this plucky young club got a nasty blow by the fearful wet that greeted their first attempt. Larry's first performance on an Auckland course must be looked upon as fully upholding his lately-won fame, as the two who finished in front of him in the Tradesman's Plate got all the best of a wretched start, and he beat the ruck a long way, having such animals as Virginia Water, Maori, Kenilworth, Paramena, Scotch Mist and Vampire behind him, besides Eocket, Tenambra, and Little Nell. Larry is a dark iron grey gelding, with an immense amount of muscle behind, and looks a thorough " cut-and-come-again " one, who would be likely to stand a lot of hard work. Our New Plymouth correspondent writes :— I regret to say an accident took place at the second day's racing. One of the horses bolted and slightly cannoned against a poor little man — quite a pretty individual — who dropped down as if shot. Eestoratives of divers kinds were tried, with no avail. Brandy had a slight effect, causing a happy smile to pass, over the poor fellow's peaceful countenance. As recovery seemed so slow, other means were tried, and one of the bystanders exclaimed, with much alarm — "By gad the horse is coming again." This had the desired effect, for up jumped the dead man, and made tracks for a safe haven. Taken altogether the accident may be considered a pretty one. The second day's racing was not by any means of so interesting a nature as its predecessor. One principal reason being the numerous scratchings, notably in the Autumn Handicap. Maid of Honor maintained the good opinion formed of her wonderful turn of speed by winning the Flying Stakes easily from Virginia Water, Mischief, and Florin ; but she failed signally in her effort to place the big event of the day, the Autumn Handicap, to the credit of her owner, being done with when a mile had been traversed. I don't consider for a moment that this proves the distance to have been too far for her, but it simply carries out what all who were acquainted with the mare's form agreed on ; that is, that she was overdone and too fine for her size, and fit only to gallop a mile at most. Moreover, I am strongly of opinion that had she really had to race in the Publican's Purse on Monday she would have collapsed. It is a decided mistake to train so big an animal down too fine, and she certainly showed better form and made better time at Christmas when she was on the big side. It is high time something was done in the shape of providing accommodation for the Press at the racecourse. It. is the Press that works up the meetings, and the Press that is looked to for full and correct reports ; and I think that the least the A.E.C. could do, woiild be to erect a stand for the reporters, with a room underneath for the use of the " gentlemen of the Press only." It would not cost much, but it would be a great boon to reporters, as at present they have to try and report the incidents of a race with a surging, elbowing crowd all around them, umbrella points jabbed in their eyes, and other slight inconveuiencies to which the representatives of the Fourth Estate ought not to be subjected ; being by nature and calling of a retiring sensitive disposition and unfitted to cope with the average " sport," especially if he chews and spits down the sleeve of your pants, as one did down mine on Monday. Poor Matau has run his last race, and gone to his well-earned rest. The gelding should never have been put over country, as he was unfitted for such work, and his value as a hurdle racer was too great to risk him over such a course as our steeplechase is run on. He was one of the last representatives of the departed Dainty Ariel, who was one of the " unfashionable sires," of whom the value , was never known till too late. He gave us, when decently mated, such a horse as Ariel, who 1 won amongst other events the Auckland Cup (three times), the Canterbury Cup, and the Auckland Derby. But his chances were few, for " he was despised" till too late to redeem the error. Matau was out of a mare called Peggy Glrey, and has always proved himself a consistent performer;. His most noticeable win was the Taranaki, Jockey Club Handicap, of. 300 soys., in March, 1881, in which event he carried' 6st9lbs (ridden by Hatfield), and beat Libeller

Bst 12lbs, Dan Bst, Resolution 7st lOlbs, Opaw Bst 91bs, King Quail 7st lOlbs, My Dream Gs* 121bs, Hippocampus, 7st 2lbs, and Rocket, covering the two miles in 3min 4<lsec, a first-class performance. Besides which he has won a heap of hurdle races in all parts of the North Island t amongst others that of the Hawke's Bay Jockey Club, autumn, 1881, in which he carried lOst lOlbs (top weight), and beat Rawanata, Harkaway, Te Whetu, Angler, Ada, and the Pope, in very fast time; and the hurdles on Monday, against some of the same horses, and some hot strangers, also in clipping time. He was a wonderful jumper, and had a great turn of foot, as he often proved conclusively. Mr Lenhard is to be sympathised with sincerely on his loss.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TO18820415.2.23

Bibliographic details

CAP AND JACKET, Observer, Volume 4, Issue 83, 15 April 1882

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2,308

CAP AND JACKET Observer, Volume 4, Issue 83, 15 April 1882

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