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MY NOTE BOOK, By "SAUL."

" Is Saul also amongst the prophets." — Scratenings. — Lord Lisgar, Marmora, and Velox out of the Melbourne Cup. — The English mail brings particulars of the great meetings at Stockton and York. — Thebais won the Yorkshire Oaks from Bal Gal, Lucy Glitters, and Syringa. — "Constant Reader." — Blue Gown won the Derby in Lady Elizabeth's year, 1868. — Up to the St. Leger, Iroquois had Avon £16,130 in stakes alone. — Steele, the leviathan of the English Ring, declares he lost £103,704 over the St. leger. — General entries for the Metropolitan Meeting, October 31st. — The Waipa Racing Clubjhas been formed at Ngaruawabia. — Entries for the Auckland Cup and A.R.C. Handicap and Steeplechase close this (Friday) evening at 8 p.m. — Abbott's £10,000 sweep on the Melbourne Cup was drawn last night too late for us to publish the numbers in this issue. — Jack Leng has got Kenilworth and Othello in training for the Hamilton meeting on St. Andrew's Day. — The North Shore folks are going to have a day's racing on November 9. The programme should be out. — The Kawakawa Racing Club has fixed the annual subscription at one guinea, and the races will be held on June 3rd. Mr Pereival will he handicapper. — The sporting man on the Herald talks of the " Czarewitch " Stakes, thereby clearly showing his ignorance of everything connected with the "Cesarewitch." — In the Great Northern Leger at the Stockton meeting Mr Vyner's Hagioscope, who ran second for the Northumberland Plate, was favourite, and won in a canter. — Petronel (Musket's son) was f avourite at 3 to 1 for the Great Yorkshire Handicap at Doncaster. He carried Bst 121bs, and won by a length from Teviotdale (the Ascot Stakes hero), Syracuse third. — Musket's daughter, Brown Bess, started favourite for the Ebor Handicap at York, but could not concede more than 2st to a smart filly like Mother Shipton, and was pulled up when it was seen pursuit was fruitless. — William Day (Edward Day's brother) has not been long in securing a big race for Mr Keene. To •win the Cesavewitch with a horse carrying 7st 121bs is no mean feat, and Foxhall's victory must have been peculiarly palatable to all concerned. — Writing in the Sporting Times of August 13 (prior to the publication of the Cesarewitch weights), John Corlett says: — "In Foxhall, William Day will have a horse after his own heart to work upon, and we should be delighted if he were to win the Cesarewitch with him." — Another triumph for Musket. I gather from the New York Herald tolegrams that Petronel won the time-honoured Doncaster Cup, beating Tristan (second for the Grand Prize of Paris), Madame dv Barry (winner of the Goodwood Cup), and Voluptuary. Why was this important item of sporting news not cabled ? —The Thames Jockey Club have issued a very liberal programme for the 26th and 27th of December, but I can't understand why they want to clash with the Auckland Cup. If the meeting were held between Cup Day and New Year's Day a lot of horses would go down aa well as all the talent. , .The Champagne Stakes at Doncaster, which in the great two-year-old event of the meeting, and one M the most ancient races in the calendar, was won this year by Lord Eosebery's flying filly Eermesse (by Cremarne out of Hazeldcan), Lord Falmouth's Dutch Oven iecona, and Mr Rothschild's Nellie (by Hermit out of Hippia) third. Kermeßse was favourite.

— The Waikato Turf Club have drawn up a tempting' programme for their meeting on St. Andrew's Day. The principal event is the Spring Handicap of lOOsovs with a sweep of ssovs added, in addition to which there is the Hurdle Race of 30sovs, a Maiden Plate of 20sovs, a Hack Race of lOsovs, the Railway Handicap of 20sovs, and a Consolation Handicap of 15sovs. — It is to be hoped that other persons who have got up sweeps will follow Mr Abbott's excellent example by holding the drawings in the presence of an impartial committee. Instances have occurred in which the drawing took place privately without any kind of check upon the honesty of the conductor. Certain winning numbers were published next day in the newspapers, but there was no kind of guarantee that the promoter himself had not held all the winning numbers. At any rate, no one in the place where the drawing was held ever met anyone who had won a prize, or who had heard of anyone else who had been blessed with luck. —The English Ring were never tired of laying against Iroquois prior to the Leger. Robert Lee, the great man at the Club (who, like the Christy Minstrels "never performs out of London") gave the Yankee "donko" at every opportunity and most of the " sharps came to the conclusion that the horse was a corpse and treated him as such. Even on the day of the race rumours were current that all wasn't right, and instead of starting at 6 to 4 on as he assuredly would have done had all seemed right, 2 to 1, 9 to 4, and in some places, even 100 to 30 was on offer against the Derby winner. The result of all this promiscuous laying was that when Lee, Steele and others came to reckon up their books on the race they found about £80,000 and £103,000 a-picce would be the cost of Iroquois* "metallic fever" to them. — The Cesarewitch Stakes, the result of which was wired too late for comment in last issue, is the greatest of the English handicaps, and holds about the same position at Homo as the Melbourne Cup does here. The race is run at Newmarket, over a straight 2 miles 2 furlongs 28 yards, and, to win, a horse must be a stayer of the first class. This year's hero, Mr J. R. Scene's Foxhall, is a bay colt by King Alfonso out of Jamaica, bred in America. He won a couple of races as a two-year-old, and this season ran second to Bend Or for the City and Suburban Handicap, subsequently winning the Grand Prize of Paris from a poor field. Chippendale, the second for this year's race, belongs to Lord Bradford, and won the Cesarewitch in 1879, carrying 7stslbs. Pidder, the third, is an American-bred colt belonging to the Duke of Hamilton, and has not hitherto done much. — From our advertising columns it will be seen that the imported thoroughbred horse Feve will stand at Gorton, Waikato, and travel in the immediate neighbourhood. This horse possesses an undeniably aristocratic pedigree, which his all-over distingue appearance' fully justifies. His bead (the index to his character) is especially blood-like, and beautifully set on to an Al neck, his girth, barrel, and quarters are all first-class, and his feet and legs are as hard as iron. In colour he is a bright golden chestnut, stands, I fancy, about 15 hands 2in or over, and is brimful of quality throughout. A glance at his pedigree should satisfy the doubts of the most determined sceptic. This horse represents all the stoutest strains of blood in the world, for on his sire's side we have Melbourne, Touchstone, Beeswing, and Doctor Syntax, while his dam goes back to Lnnercost, Liverpoo l , Plenipotentiary, Walton, Parasol, Whalebone, Waxy, and Prunella. Such are the lineage and recommendations of Feve, and I can conceive nothing better on this side of the Line for improving the breed of horses in the colony. — From a cablegram in the Now York Herald I glean particulars of the Doucaster St. Leger, for which there was a field of 18 runners, the largest contingent that has contested the race since Hawthornden upset Kingei-aft in 1870. Despite the apparently invincible prospects of the American champion (Iroquois) the Ring wei'e liberal in their offers up to the lnst, tending as much ns 100 to 30 on the field even when the ling fell. This hardihood (dearly pnid for subsequently) was no doubt caused by the confidence displayed by Mr Crawfurd and the followers of St. Louis, who piled the money on till they brought their colt to 9 to 2— lshmael at 5 to 1, and Scobell and Geologist at 10 and 12 to 1, being also in great demand. Iroquois looked in splendid fettle, and when he cantered prior to the parade even the most sceptical thought he might succeed where so many Derby winnei's had failed. The story of the race is soon told. Coming into the straight, Ishmael, ridden by Johnny Osborno, led by several lengths, and it looked as though he would win easily. All of a sudden, however, the northern colt shut up ns if he was shot, and Archer, taking his place with Iroquois, stalled off Geologist and Lucy Glitters, winning eventually by a length, Geologist second, and Lucy Glitters, three-quarters of a length off, third. Ten lengths off came St. Loiiis, Eusebe, and. Ishmael, who were a similar distance in front of Bal Gal and Fortissimo.

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Bibliographic details

MY NOTE BOOK, By "SAUL.", Observer, Volume 3, Issue 58, 22 October 1881

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1,497

MY NOTE BOOK, By "SAUL." Observer, Volume 3, Issue 58, 22 October 1881

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