This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

Death of James McCosh Clark.

Auckland, January 28, J Every citizen of Auckland to-day learnt with Borrow of the death of Mr James McOosh Clark, who for many years was one of our most prominent citizens.

The news was conveyed by cable message received last night in the following words :—" Illness of three days, apparently not serious, James died from heart failure early this morning; conscions—-peaceful." It is about eight years since Mr and Mrs Clark and family left Auckland for London, where they have resided up till now. Mr Clark had been in fairly good health up till last February, when he became subject to heart troubles, and other complications. At that time the medical men looked upon his illness as being very serious, and did not give much hope of ultimate recovery. During the last few months, however, the news has been more encouraging,and sometime since Mr Clark was able to be removed from Hatnpstead to Hastings, where he has passed the winter, and where he died. During the last two

months he has been able to write with his own hand to his brothers here, and he told them that when he was stronger he would return to Auckland, during the present year. But it was not to be. Mr Clark leaves a wife and five children. The eldest son is serving articles with a firm of solicitors in London, the second son is in the warehouse of the firm, while the three girls are completing their education. Mr Clark was born in Beith, Scot land, in 1833, and was the eldest son

of the late Mr Archibald ClarK. who came of a very old Ayrshire family. Mr James McCofeh Clark arrived in Auckland with his father in 1849. In 1856 he was admitted as a partner into the business, which became the well known firm of Archibald Clark and Son, and after the death of Archibald Clark, senr., became the firm of Archibald Clark and Sons, of which Mr James McCosh Clark was the senior and managing partner. He took an I active interest in volunteering, and commanded a company of volunteers during the Waikato campaign, serving in the field. Captain Clark gave a champion belt for competition by the force, which stimulated good shooting. In 1880 he became Mayor of Auckland, and served three terms- During his Mayoralty the city tramways were built, the site of the Free Public Library and Art Gallery determined upon, and the Town Hall site purchased, At last night's meeting of the City Council, Mr W. J. Rees, accountant at Messrs Clark and Sons, announcedthat a cable message announcing the death of Mr J. M. Clark had just been received. It was resolved to send a letter of condolence to Mr Clark's relatives. | , ■ _■' ■

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item
Bibliographic details
Word Count

Death of James McCosh Clark. Thames Star, Volume XXX, Issue 8978, 28 January 1898

  1. New formats

    Papers Past now contains more than just newspapers. Use these links to navigate to other kinds of materials.

  2. Hierarchy

    These links will always show you how deep you are in the collection. Click them to get a broader view of the items you're currently viewing.

  3. Search

    Enter names, places, or other keywords that you're curious about here. We'll look for them in the fulltext of millions of articles.

  4. Search

    Browsed to an interesting page? Click here to search within the item you're currently viewing, or start a new search.

  5. Search facets

    Use these buttons to limit your searches to particular dates, titles, and more.

  6. View selection

    Switch between images of the original document and text transcriptions and outlines you can cut and paste.

  7. Tools

    Print, save, zoom in and more.

  8. Explore

    If you'd rather just browse through documents, click here to find titles and issues from particular dates and geographic regions.

  9. Need more help?

    The "Help" link will show you different tips for each page on the site, so click here often as you explore the site.