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The Thames Election.

£.ddt-&3s fey K% T&,ylov>

Trie -vcuiemj of Music wa« packed last night, „ii,>n M r {£ j|_ T*ylor delivered his fi(,al address ia connection with the present, electoral campaign, and was aocorded a roost enthusiastic receptiou. Mr A. Eae moved, on behalf of the young colonials, and Mr Snelgar seconded, that the Mayor (Mr MoAndrew) should take the Chair, which was carried by acclamation.

Tho Chairman, in a few introductory remarks, referred to the pleasure he felt at seeing some 80 young colonials on the platform, and called upon Mr Taylor, who was received wiih greßt applause. Mr Taylor's address was principally « review of general topics, and (he result of the meetings he had held in rarii us parte of the electorate, some of the incidents given being very amusing. Mo asked that shose who wera supporting him would <ake .no notice of the scurrilous remarks that had appeared in the newspapers, signed by anonymous writers who were apparently afraid of their names; and contended that be had at any rate been the means of directing the attention of the electors more closely to the position of things politically. Several of the letters which appeared in both the local papers were reviewed, as well as the telegrams and the action of the President of-the Coromandel Miners' Union, which, Mr Taylor said, had been token on his own responsibility, as his action, was discountenanced by the Union at that place. He maintained that bo bad never crawled around the Union for votes, and that he had repeatedly refused to stand for the seat, until at last strong pressure was brought upon him to do so When he left Coromandel he had seen a petition bring drawn up stating that the Coromandel Union were not running Mr Cad man as their candidate. Mr Taylor spoke at some length on the gold duty question, and contended that it was unfair that so much capital should have been sought to be made against him on this question, as he had always declared his opinion that tho matter should be left to the option of the local bodies, and he had told tho Mayor this before he bad consented to staud for the seat With reference to the " No-confidence vote at Kuaotunu," Mr Taylor said he was unable to state whether such a resolution was carried, because as soon as a motion was proposed, cheers were called and given for Mr Cadman, and counter cheers for himself. He maintained that the people at that ptece, when they bad heard him the second time on the gold duty, were satisfied that he bad made the same statement at bis first meeting, and many called out, " Right, sir, that's what you did say ;" while he also asserted that the declaration published as an advertisement in the local papers, with the signatures attached re the gold duty, was not the original, as that bad been lost. The meetings at Cabbage Bay, Whanga* poua, &c, were next referred to, after which Mr Taylor referred to the education question, again expressing his opinion that it shoold be free and secular ; the Workmen's Wages Bill, which he considered an utter failure and impracticable iv it 3 present form; Protection, which he was against ; and Vaile's system of railway reform, a modification of which he would support. Mr Taylor concluded by expressing a hope that the contest to-day between himself and his (riend Mr Cadman would bo conducted in the best possible spirit, and that be (the speaker) would be placed at the head of the poll. Mr Taylor then resumed his seat amidst cheers and most enthusiastic applause.

After a few questions had been asked and answered,

Mr D. E. O'Sullivan proposed : " That the thanks of this large and representative meeting are due to Mr Taylor for the able and satisfactory manner in which he has dealt; with the several important political questions of the day; that we assure him that we have every confidence in him as a fit nnd proper person to represent this constituency io the Parliament of New Zealand 5 and, farther, that we to-morrow by our united support will use every fair means to place him in that honorable position." Mr O'Sullivan, in the course of a brief upeeeh which he made in moving the resolution, appealed to every working man to vote for Mr Taylor, and thus show their approval of the selection made by the committee.

Mr W. H- Potts seconded the motion, which was carried amidst great applause. Three hearty cheers were tbeu given for Mr Taylor, and another for the Chairman, after which the meeting, which was most enthusiastic throughout, terminated.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/THS18901205.2.14

Bibliographic details

The Thames Election., Thames Star, Volume XXII, Issue 6749, 5 December 1890

Word Count
781

The Thames Election. Thames Star, Volume XXII, Issue 6749, 5 December 1890

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