Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

DEATH OF MR C. G .TRIPP.

A laTge'number of friends of the family, and a much wider circle of acquaintances,., yesterday learned with great regret that one of the pioneer settlers of Canterbury, a model settler, and everywhere and always a popular one, Mr Charles George Tripp, of Orari. Gorge Station, passed away on Tuesday night, after a severe illness, at the*ag« of 72. Mr Tripp's health had for a few months past been a cause of anxiety to his friends, as the cause of it, an internal evil, with enlargement of the liver, was known to be not only beyond cure ? but usually a cause of intense suffering. Fortunately, the deceased gentleman was spared the pain, and to the last, being kept m ignorance of the serious nature of his illness, was cheerful and hopeful, and m the possession of all his mental faculties. He was taken seriously ill m Wellington between two and three months ago, and after lying there some time was carefully and successfully brought to Timaru, on the way to his home at Orari Gorge, which he was fated not to s^e again, and for the past month or so he had received here every attention that medical skill and caieful nursing could suggest. A painless . complication appeared on Tuesday evening, and being informed by his medical attendants that his end was inevitably near, Mr Tripp sent for his son, Mr 0. H. Tripp, finally arranged his affairs, and calmly resigned i himself to death, pSssirigSpeacefully away a few hours later. Mr Tripp was the third son of the late Rev. Dr Tripp, Rector of Silverton, Devon, and was born at Kentisbeare, m that county, m 1826. He was educated at the MerchantTaylors' School, London, and being brought up for the legal profession was called to the Bar at Lincoln's Inn m 1853. In the following year, however, at the age of 28, he emigrated to New Zealand, m company with Mr (now the Hon,) J. B. A. AcJand, who was for many years his partner, arriving m Lyttelton m January,; 1855.,* -In the latter part of the year Mr Tripi* came down to explore the south of Canterbury, and on returning to Christchurch. was greeted as one who had visited aii unknown world. The result of his excursion was that he and Mr Acland became the pioneer pastoralists upon the hill country of Canterbury* taking up what are now the Mount Somera, Mount Possession, Mount Peel, and Orari Gorge runs, and it is worthy of riota that these two gentlemen were the

only pioneer settlers who were able to retain the lands or any of them that they originally took up. In May, 1856, MrTripp started from Christchurch with drays and men to establish a homestead at Mt. Peel and the party reached their destination after a toilsome journey of sixteen days For four years he lived m a primitive sod whare, working hard early and late making grand illuminations m the burning season when clearing off the dense dead tussock and thick fern, that the pioneers found covering the hills, and gaining a reputation &s fearless and successful explorer. In 1858 he married Miss Ellen Shephard, third daughter of the late Bishopr Harper who with four sons and four daughters survives him. The sod whare then gave place to a more commodious dwelling at Mt. Somers. In 1863 Mr Tripp paid a visit to the Old Country, and on returning settled finally at Orari Gorge where he made a home which was deservedly one to be proud of, and thereafter devoted himself to the task of improving his property with an energy,, perseverance, and success unusual among hill runholders. As a sheep farmer he steadily endeavoured to improve his flock m the direction of making it more suitable for hilly country, and for many years we believe the Orari Gorge clips used to top the market. He was until recently one of the staunehest supporters of the Agricultural and Pastoral Association, and endeavoured to encourage his fellow pastoralists to follow his example, by offering special prizes for sheep suitable for hill runs. He was among the first to appreciate' the value of wire fencing, and must have spent large sums, m erecting fences over rugged country. We believe that he was also one of the first among pastoralists to undertake " laying down " on an extensive scale, and as at Orari Gorge there is but little level land, the hill sides were brought under the plough and English grasses. Mr Tripp was never a politician m the wider sense, but no one m South Canterbury excelled hira m the interest he took m local affairs of all kinds, and he has jalways been an active and popular member of one or more of the local governing bodies ever since local government was instituted. On the formation of the Mount Peel Road Board m 1870, he was elected a member, and has been a member ever since, from time to time being also elected chairman. He was also elected to the Geraldine Road Board m 1872f and chairman from 1874 to 1876. In 1878 he was returned to the Geraldine Cp.unty Council, and was chairman of that body for a number of years. He was also for some years a member" of the Tiroaru Harbour Board. We may add here that Mr Tripp was one of the twelve founders of the Christchurch Club, He was an active worker m many local voluntary associations, whose objects were to benefit the district m any way. Such for example was his energetic insistence upon the necessity for action m checking the spread of rabbits m South Canterbury, a necessity which he long foresaw, and which would probably by this time have been impressed upon; everyone had not the disastrous winter of two years ago checked the pest so effectually. In public as m private life, Mr Tripp was distinguished by indefatigable activity^ unswerving rectitude, and unvarying courtesy, setting an example of high feeling, unpretending kindness and generosity, and scrupulously honourable conduct. His character was held m high esteem by all classes, not least by the working classes, for whom he always, felt and manifested a true sympathy, as many a one can testify who owes to him his first stait m life. This sympathy with the working classes is visible m substantial form, m the excellence, of the accommodation provided for the i regular hands and shearers «t the ! station. Mr Tripp has often been exIcepted as the model runholder, and Orari Gorge as the model station, when those of his class were brought undei I condemnation for disregard of their employees' comfort ; and when it was the fashion m certain places to talk of " bursting up" the squatters as eum- | bereraof the ground, MrTripp was named as an honourable exception. And while the proofs of his considerateness towards his workmen can thus be seen, they are also to be heard from the lips of former employees now scattered over the colonies, and from the lips of many more who have been made welcome at the station as callers seeking for work. Mr Trtpp was a consistent churchman, and ife was by his exertions chiefly that the Woodbury Church was built and has been maintained ; and. it is therefore appropriate that it is m here that the funeral service will take place to-jnflr.roWi-_-v...-- -.----•, .•■■--•;■'.-,- -.-..-.■ ■ - . .-

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/THD18970708.2.26

Bibliographic details

DEATH OF MR C. G.TRIPP., Timaru Herald, Volume LX, Issue 2441, 8 July 1897

Word Count
1,235

DEATH OF MR C. G.TRIPP. Timaru Herald, Volume LX, Issue 2441, 8 July 1897

Working