Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
Article image
This article displays in one automatically-generated column. View the full page to see article in its original form.

The Timaru Herald. THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1884.

Something of a sensation has been caused at Ashburton by Mr Samuel Charles Jolly coming foiwavd as a candidate for election to the House of Representatives m the place of Mr 3D. G. Wright, who has recently resigned his seat. Mr Jolly is described as a " chaffy " on a threshing machine, whatever that may be, and actually is, what we seldom see on a political platform, a working man. who works. Nine out of ten of the so-called working men who come forward m elections or on other occasions when politics are on the board, are mainly distinguished by their rooted rep\ignance for work of any sort. How they get their living is a mystery ; or, rather, it would be a mystery, if it were not well known that this is the finest country m the world for those who are not ashamed to loaf. They are mere professional " working men," agitators by trade, who have learnt by heart a few democratic platitudes and formula}, which they repeat over and over again with exasperating monotony. It is due to the good sense of the public to say that they are very seldom taken m by these gentry, who, for the most part, get nothing by their political activity beyond a limited share of notoriety, and an almost unlimited quantity of free beer. But they are an unmitigated nuisance, for all that ; and we often wonder the working men do not kick them or put them under a pump for their impertinence m pretending to be leaders of theirs. Any working man of ordinary intelligence and self-respect, we should say, must feel disgusted at hearing one of these idle blockheads grinding out a lot of second hand sham radicalism, which he does not understand a word of, and pretending it represents the views and conveys the sentiments of a class with whom m reality he has nothing m common. As a fact, we have often noticed that when one of these fellows makes his appearance and begins the usual harangue, the first to show impatience are the working men. Mr Jolly seems to be none of that sort. He is what he professes to be, a man who gets his daily bread by his daily toil. He has been a sailor, and he is a laborer ; but ho claims, with perfect justice, to have as good a right as any other man to express his own opinions on public affairs, and he contends, further, that his knowledge of the world and experience of various countries entitle his opinions to some weight. A large audience, we are told, assembled at Mr Jolly's invitation, more for the fun of the thing than anything else ; no doubt supposing him to be some humbug or other who wanted to air his ignorance and self-conceit. But they found they were mistaken. Mr Jolly turned out to be very superior to the average candidate. He made a very interesting speech, and displayed a clearer habit of thought and a better mode of conveying it, than most of the Members of the House of Representatives possess. We do not hesitate to say that if that speech is a fair specimen of Mr Jolly's reflections, ho would be a decided acquisition to the House. He spoke his own mind, at all events, instead of giving his hearers only the threadbare rags of other people's ideas ; and his own mind appears to be a naturally shrewd one enlarged by travel and improved by observation. Mr Jolly has been made a subject of ridicule m some quarters, wo observe, because he used words and phrases such as only illiterate people use ; but we think nothing of that. It does not really matter two pins what dialect of a language a man speakß, as long as he speaks his dialect strongly and •Unaffectedly. For our part, wo would much rather hear a man say what ho has to say well, m his own rough, blunt way, than hear him try to use long words and , elegant expressions, and make a hash of it. Some of the most effective speakers we ever heard m our life were illiterate men. In fact, the moment a speaker commands attention by his earnestness or ability, his hearers cease to notice what eort of words or phrases:

ie employs. There is nothing more lickening, on the other hand, than to isten to cant or drivel, delivered m ivould-be fine language. We can see nothing to laugh at or to be offended by m Mr Jolly making his electioneering speech m precisely the same sort of dialect that he is accustomed to use when talking with his mates at the threshing machine. We are glad that he has come forward and we hope that he will stick to hia declared intention of going to the poll. We should be heartily glad to see a few real working men get into the House, to " put the Kibosh " — is not that the term ? — on the imitation article, and establish a direct channel of communication between their class and the public councils of the country.

This article text was automatically generated and may include errors. View the full page to see article in its original form.
Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/THD18840529.2.4

Bibliographic details

The Timaru Herald. THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1884., Timaru Herald, Volume XL, Issue 3020, 29 May 1884

Word Count
861

The Timaru Herald. THURSDAY, MAY 29, 1884. Timaru Herald, Volume XL, Issue 3020, 29 May 1884

Working