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LOCAL NEWS OF THE MONTH.

Timaru School.— The annual meeting for auditing the school accounts was held m the schoolroom on 22nd Feb. Present— Key G Foster, and Messrs liellield and Luxmoore. Mr Fusti-r stated tliat, notwithstanding the opposition of otlier schools, the Timaru school had prospered during the year, and during the last quarter had shewn a marked increase m the number of scholars attending. After passing the accounts, which were satisfactory, the meeting separated. Well .Sinking. — Another deep sunk well has lately bi-.'ii added to the few existing m the town! Mr Cliff has sunk one close to his mill, going through over fifty feet of rock. From this will it is intended to supply, by Btcttm power, two four hundred gallon tanks, which arc placed thirty feet from the ground, nml attached to the top storey of the building. These tanks supply all tho water necessary m the mill, and also Mr Brown's brewery adjacent. Bi'SAWiT HOR3E3. — On Monday evening Feb. 15, about five o'clock, v team of three horses, m tandem fashion, with a dray load of blue stone came tearing down the main street of Timaru at a hand gallop without a driver, and caused no little consternation. Tho horses kept pretty well to the middle of the road, and several attempts were miulc to stop them, but all were unsuccessful. On reaching the corner of George street the horses swerved from the road and were nmking for the pathway m front of the Club Hotel, but here the head of the leader was turned round by Mr McKae, and the horses were brought to a stand still by the dray coming m contact with the telegraph post. The shaft horse- immediately fell to the ground and one shaft of tho dray was broken, besides the body of the dray being injured. The telegraph post was much shaken, the insulators broken, and the wires brought to the ground. The horse 9, which belong to a carter named McDougall, were not injured m any way. Preserving and Boiling Down. — We understand that a number of gentlemen interested m obtaining a market for the surplus stock of the Timaru district met at the Royal Hotel on the 4th instant, at the invitation of Mr Sheath, to hear from him a statement of his views on the advisability of commencing near to Timaru the business of preserving meat for export to England, as well as a boiling-down establishment, The gentlemen present were Messrs W. K. Macdou.ild, G. B. Parker, Perring, Luxmoore, Matson, and H. J. LeCren. Mr Sheath explained the objecs he had m asking these gentlemen together, but as the meeting was a preliminary one, and private, we are unible to give a full report of the proceedings. The matter was talked over at some length, but nothing definite determined on. We trust, however, that we shall soon see the question taken up m earnest, for it is a most important one for the runholders. Serious Accident. — We regret very much to have to record a serious accident which happened to Captain Crawford of the Government Landing Service on the 2nd inst. Captain Crawford had been over the Opihi river seeing his steam threshing machine safely accoss and was returning homewards about ten o'clock. Almost directly after crossing the river the horse he was driving (a young animal and newly broken to harness) run awny and ran against a trap, nearly opposite to Mr Patterson's hotel. Captain Crawford was pitched out falling on his head, and one of tho wheels it is supposed passed over his forehead inflicting v serious wound. The unfortunate gentleman was at onco conveyed to Mr Patterson's hotel where he still lies. Yesterday we were glad to hear ho was doing well, and no serious results are anticipated from the accident. Importation of Machinery. — The Wa : uui, m a recent trip from Dunedin brought a 20-horse power engine for Mr Cliffs Hour and saw mills, Mr Cliff finding the engine heretofore m use far too small for his requirements. The new engine is by Tenuant and Co., of Leitli, and seems to he of excellent workmanship. The boiler weighs about 6 tons, and the fly-wheel 2 tons 17 cwt. This is the largest engine that has been lauded at Timaru. Butciiebs' Auctions. — The system of selling carcasses and sides of meat by public auction which has been very successful m Dunedin and Oaniaru, is about to be introduced into Timaru. Mr Stubbs gives notice that he will sell butchers' meat every Wednesday and Saturday morning at 7 a.m., and Mr F. Lc Cron is to hold the first of his scries of sales on Saturday at noon. These sales will afford an opportunity to working men, who are desirous of obtaining cheap meat for cash, of gratifying their desires, and we have no doubt they will also tend to bring down the price of meat retailed by the butchers. Fire Relief Committee. — A meeting of this Committee was held on the 9th instant. There were five gentlemen present; It was stated that there was a balance m the hands of the Committee of £23 1.3s sd, and it was resolved that this sum should be devoted to a permanent charitable relief fund, and Dr McLean and Messrs Cain and Healey were appointed a committee to distribute the fund ; and they were further requested to take steps to obtain donations and annual subscriptions with a view of establishing a permanent fund for the relief of necessitous casc9. We believe it is intended that subscribers shall themselves elect a committee annually to distribute the funds, the first election to take place shortly, the gentlemen named above having consented to act m the meantime.' A subscription list was opened m the room, when five pounds wero immediately sub•cribed. • AccuMATTBATioif. — Tho Timaru district shows almost less interest m acclimatisation than any other part of New Zealand, if we may judge by the efforts made by the public. The most careless indifference has been, so far, shown towards the question, whilst m other parts of the colony wo find societies springing up, and their usefulness recognised. Wo observe that a society is about to be established m the Wairarapa district, Wellington. The birds and animals which have already been introduced by private individuals have thriven remarkably well. The Mercury says : — " We heard of eight deer being seen together m one place, and of five m another. The pheasants have also thriven, and the linnets and magpies introduced by R. Collins, Esq., have spread to a great distance from- Te Ori Ori, the place where they wero originally let loose. Fiah would undoubtedly thrive m Wairarapa streams, and could now be obtained at a trifling cost froui tho neighbouring settlements." New Post and Teleobapii Offices. — It will be seen from an advertisement m another column that tenders have been called for the erection of new post and telegraph offices. It will be an immense boon to the public when the new offices are erected, for the present postal accommodation is miserably insufficient. Supreme Court. —The following bankruptcy cases were heard m Chambers. Christajurch, oa tho sth inst., before Mr Justice Gresson. Re William Cockerell Beswick. — Mr Cowlishaw applied for an ordi r fixing a day for last examination and discharge. There had been no meeting of creditors m this case, as a sufficient number did not attend. His Honor said that the Act had not been complied with m this case, as the application should have been made many days previously. Mr Cowlishaw said that he received his instructions from Timaru. After some discussion, his Honor said he would consider the matter. His present impression was that it was necessary to adhere to the sixty days. Be Edyvin Hooper.— Mr Cowlishaw applied for a similar order m this matter There had been no meeting of creditors. The application to fix a date for last examination was within sixty days. His Honor made the order a« prayed, fixing the last examination for the 11th March. Be Daniel Munra— Mr Cowlishaw applied for an order of complete execution of deed, and to annul

"Ie order of adjudication made on the Bth J.inuary 1869. His Honor made the order as jj-.ijed.

Timard Gakkick Club.— We hear it is the intention of the members of the Timaru Debating Society to turn the Society into a Garrick Club. The Club intends giving a series of entertainments during the winter months. Sehious Accident. — On the 18th ultimo, a serious accident happened to a man named James Bradford, m the employ of Mr Brown, brewer. It appears he was driving the truck, when he fell off the seat, and the truck passed over him, breaking one of his legs. The poor fellow was at once conveyed to the hospital, whero he is now doing well. Penny Readings. — A meeting was culled recently at the Royal Hotel to inaugurate penny readings m Timaru. Through want of attendance the meeting lapsed. Since then we hear that a few gentlemen interested m the matter have held a meeting and have decided to hold entertainments during the winter months, not entirely confined to reudings. An Eligible Settler. — We learn from a paragraph m a Christ church contemporary of the 13th ult. that at the Police Court on the previous day, one " Hugh Davis, on remand for vagrancy, was again brought up, and his Worship informed him that the Provincial Government had agreed to pay his passage down to Timaru, and it was to be hoped he would amend his ways, and endeavour to earn an honest livelihood." It seems that the offscourings of the Btreets of Christchurch are shipped to Timaru at tho expenso of the Government. When wo ask for labour these are tho kind of men forwarded to us. We can only retaliate, if such a system is continued, by organising a society to ship such characters back again from whence they come. Timaru Choral Society. — A concert was given by this Society at the Royal Assembly Rooms, on the evening of 17th ultimo, and on the#holc was hardly equal to the majority of the concerts given by the Choral Society. The first part of the programme was well carried through, but did not meet with so much of the appluuso and favour of the audience as the second portion. There were some very pretty ballads during the evening which were most creditably given, and we can only regret that they wero not fully appreciated, or perhaps it would be more correct to say that the audience was not demonstrative m its appreciation of lie efforts of the singers. The attendance was moderate, but we think the Society had almost a right, under the circumstances, to look for a crowded house, and for more support from the public than it received. The effort to rcplaco property lost m the fire belonging to the Society was ono which should have been more generally countenanced. We should all remember that, although a charge is made for admittance, the members of the Society not only give their time and talents gratuitously, but are sometimes called upon to give their money as well for the purchase of music for their own use. Tho charge for admittance is merely to defray ordinary expenses connected with the concerts, and that charge has now been reduced to the lowest limits. We should be very sorry indeed to see any falling off either m the attendance of the performors or the public, at the concerts given by the Choral Society, for it has afforded, and still promises to afford, the only real intellectual amusement m the town. We may further express a hope that the Society will not slacken m its efforts. It has already achieved a good standing, by a great deal of labour on tho part of every individual member as well as of the Conductor. Flax Mill at Temuka. — We hear that Borne enterprising persons contemplate erecting a flax mill m this district. Seeing the success which has attended other mills m the colony there can be little doubt of a mill at Temuka proving remunerative, as m the Teniuka and neighbouring districts flax grows most luxuriantly. Xemuka. — Recently a novel spectacle was presented at Temuka, m the removal bodily of a house, or rather part of a house ; being the druggist's shop belonging to Mr Rayner, who, finding himself somewhat out of the way of business, decided on removiug to a situation more suitable for bis purpose. The building was placed upon a carriage constructed for the occasion, and, drawn by a team of bullocks, moved up the road, and arrived without accident at the place of its destination ; a hitherto unoccupied plot of ground between the Crown Hotel and Mr Wilcox's, saddler, where it was at once nxe*d m position. Bankbuetct m Lyttelton. — We extract the following paragraph from the Olago Daily Times of the 6th inst. : — " Mr J. Aarons, the well-known Victorian trade assignee, has furnished us with some further particulars with relation to the insolvency of Mr David Davis, of Lyttelton. Mr Davis, it seemed, arrived m Melbourne towards the end of hist year, and made very large purchases there. In a short time he concluded his arrangements having ordered between £7000 and £8000 worth of goods, to be forwarded to his- order m Lyttelton, cash for some portions to be paid on arrival; Instead of a remittance being made as promised, some four weeks after letters were received from him stating that circumstances he had not foreseen had compelled him to suspend payment, and asking that the various creditors would appoint representatives to attend a meeting to be held at Lyttelton on sn early date. On receipt of these communications a meeting of the Melbourne creditors was promptly called, and the result was that Mr Aarous wad unanimously delegated with full powers to act m Now Zealand. He arrived by the Gothenburg, and on his arrival placed himself m communication with the Dunedin creditors of the insolvent (whose claims amount to £1,600) and they having met together, resolved to give him similar powers to those delegated by his Melbourne principals. He, therefore, proceeds to the meeting to be held on Monday next, as the representative of nearly £10,000 of the liabilities, which are set down at £28,776 10s lid. The amount of available assets is stated to be £8,000, represented by stock-in-store, £5,000, and bills and cash m hand, £2,500. These are figures given by the insolvent to his creditors ; but, from information received today by Mr Aarons from his agent at Lyttelton, there is reason to believe that the assets will fall short of the amount stated." Lyttelton Election. — Mr J. D. Macpherson has been returned as a member of the Provincial Council for Lyttelton. He was opposed by Mr T. Merson. Thk River Waimakakiri. — Under the Canterbury Rivers Act four conservators have been appointed for the South Waimakariri district viz. :- Messrs Harman, Peacock, J. T. Fisher, and J. N TosswelL Mr John Anderson the Mayor of Christchurch being ex oflicio the fifth conservator. In speaking of the appointments, and the necessity existing for their being made, the Times, of the 18th of February, says: — "The importance of the trust now committed into the hands of the Board of Conservators cannot be well exaggerated. Though the crisis has happily been averted up to the present time, it mu&t not be forgotten that the Waimakariri is an ever present source of danger to Christchurch. It may not be generally known but it is a fact, that on two occasions during the present summer, a few inches of gravel and the labour of two or three men on the spot, were all that stood between the city and a destructive flood. Had these slight obstacles been overcome, it is the opinion of many that the course of the river wonld m all probability have been diverted through the district of Christchurch. Had this been the case, it is quite impossible to estimate the destruction that wonld have ensued. A large quantity of the city would have been rendered comparatively valueless. A loss so extensive and ruinous as this would i as a matter of course, affect the value of such of the surrounding property as escaped the ravages of the river, and react with ruinous consequences upon the whole community. Happily we have escaped such a catastrophe so far, out as a proof that this is no imaginary danger, we have the opinion of those best qualified to judge, who assert; that if the higher embankment had given way at the last fresh some if not all of these consequences would inevitably have followed,"

Timaru Park Reserve. — A recent Gazette informs us of the appoiutment of Messrs Hewlings, Luxmoore, and Belfield as Commissioners U> superintend the planting and cultivation of this reserve. .Shooting Season. — A petition signed by about tifty gentleman resident m the district has been forwarded to his Excellency the Governor, praying him to proclaim the districts of Timaru and Gladstone open for shooting from the Ist April to the 3 1st August. Tub Late Fibe at Timaku. — The following list shows as near as possible the actual amounts paid by the various insurance companies for losses by the fire at Timaru m December last :— New Zealand £G,SGO, Liverpool and London £G,GOO, Imperial £3,050, North British £3,700, London and Lancashire £3,000, Victoria £2,200, R0yal £1800, Northern. £1700, making a total of £29,810, or say £30,000. It will be remembered that thi9 sum was the estimate of the loss of the insurance companies given by us at the time of the fire. There can be no divided opinion as to the value of insurance companies, for had not the loss at Timaru been relieved m severity by the operations of these companies, no one can tell how far it might have effected the prosperity of the town. We have our own opinion about the promptitude with which some of the companies met the claims, and the cause there was to be dissatisfied with their delay, but we never doubted tho value of such companies. It does seem unfortunate, however, that the larger the public loss, the greater is the delay m settling the olainis. Fire m CuiusTCiirßCH. — A disastrous fire occurred on tho 3rd instant, m Christchurch, on the block of land bounded by Cashel, Colombo, Lichfield and High streets. The buildings destroyed belonged to Mr Bailey, a timber merchant, whose loss is estimated from £500 to £000. By the services, however, of three engines, the fire was quickly got under, not more than thirty minutes elapsing from the time the fire was first disco rored to being quenched. The origin of the fire is at present unknown. Station Properties. — The Otngo Daily Times of sth int. ssuys : — At the sale held by Messrs Power, Pant lin, and Co., at the Longroom, Criterion Hotel, yesterday, of the properties belonging to Messrs Holmes, Barnhill, and Co., there was a very large attendance, great interest being manifested m tho sale of such a valuable property as the Castle Rock Station. The following were the lots sold :— Lot 1. The Castle Rock Station, comprising 20,000 ucrps freehold and 45,000 acres leiisbold, with 40,500 sheep, 43 head of pure bred short-horns, bred by Messrs Morton and M"Leish, 19 horses, and all improvements was knocked down, after some spirited bidding, to the Hon. Matthew Holmes f0r£ 48,500. Lot 2. The Oreti Run, containing 715 acres freehold, 250 acres pre-emptive right, and 10,300 acres leasehold, and 476 head of mixed cattle, with stockyards and improvements thereon, was purchased by Messrs Barnhill and Buchanan for £5,500. Lot 3. Comprising 225 head of steers, running on the Munipori Station, was bought m at the price of £7 10s per head. Au offer of £6 per head was made." Fire at Hawke's Bat. — The Hawke's Bay Boiling Down Establishment wes burnt down on the sth inst. The innin building, machinery, 133 bales of wool, and seven tons of tallow, were destroyed. The cause of the fire is not known, and it is said the establishment was only partially insured. Its destruction will be a public loss, as 14,000 sheep wero ready for the pot. The Wreck at Napier. — We have the following additional particulars of the wreck of the Ida Ziegler at Napier, which we take from the Otago papers. A heavy black nor'easter prevailed at Napier on Saturday the 27th February. The ship Ida Zieglcr, m the roadstead, with 2,500 bales of wool on board, parted her cable. Tho captain hoisted the forsail and ran her on tho beuch, two miles from Napier. The crew, numbering 28, landed by cradles m safety. A line was fustencd to a hencoop, which the surf washed ashore; and the line having been then fastened to the inainyardami, a cradle was rigged, which enabled the crew to get ashore. At 5.20, the masts went by the board ; and m twenty minutes afterwards, all was over. She had 2,500 bales of wool on board when she parted her cable, then she broke up ; and soon afterwards the beuch was covered with wool — some 300 bales being saved. All the spare labour available was employed m saving the wool, and some 300 bales were saved, but a heavy westerly gale sprang up on Sunday and drove everything to sea. The wreck has been sold for £52, but both ship and cargo are believed to be insured. The vessel has entirely broken up. The Duke's Visit. — The Tuapeka Times does not think very highly of the manner m which the Duke of Edinburgh wus received m Australia on his first visit, if we may judge |by the following paragraph : — " The Galatea, I Captain H.R. H. the Duke of Edinburgh, has . j arrived at Adelaide, and for tho next three months we may expect a display of flunkeyism and fulsome adulation sufficient to eicken the strongest stomach. We trust, but dare not hope, that New Zealand will abstain from any such ludicrous outbursts as characterised the reception of H.R.H. last year by New South Wales and Victoria. Loyalty and courtesy demand that the Duke be received with due honour, as representative of her Majesty, but- to pay almost divine honours to a young man who has not as yet distinguished hirußelf m any way appears an absurd and expensive extravagance. But it is no use talking : toadies will be toadies, and flunkies continue to grace the plush m the Southern as well as the Northern Hemisphere." • Smaxli Pox. — It seems that one case of small pox has been reported m this colony. At Wanganui, a man was suffering from the disease, and the authorities appear to have been so alarmed as to take the most extreme measures to prevent contagion. For one night the patient was m an qpen boat, anchored inside the heads, exposed to a drenching rain the whole time, but a tent has since boen erected for him on the spit, which has been declared a quarantine ground. In Otago precautionary measures have been taken, and all vessels arriving m that province from Australia will bo placed m quarantine for a short time until it is ascertained whether there is any sickness on board, as there is no doubt that small pox has appeared m Victoria. The Provincial Government of Canterbury have issued notices calling public attention to the Vaccination Act; which provides that all children shall be vaccinated before the age of six months, otherwise the parents are liable to a penalty. .In Mejiobiam. — The Orey River Argus of the 9th Feb. says : — " The memorials to be erected m the cemetery to Mr Dobson, and the other two surveyors who lost their lives m the service of the Canterbury Government, and whose remains lie m the game enclosure with Dobson, arrived, at last, by the Beautiful Star on Saturday. Tenders are called for the erection of the monument and railings." English Mail via San Francisco. — The subject of a new mail route to Europe via San Francisco and the Pacific Railroad appears to be occupying attention m Wellington. The Independent says: — "We are happy to hear that a mail route via America to Europe will not be abandoned altogether, as statistical facts are being collected m \ Wellington for the information of any company which may be inaugurated before the Great' Pacific Railway is completed, for the establishment of direct communication between the capital of New Zealand and San Francisco."

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LOCAL NEWS OF THE MONTH., Timaru Herald, Volume X, Issue 396, 13 March 1869

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LOCAL NEWS OF THE MONTH. Timaru Herald, Volume X, Issue 396, 13 March 1869

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