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OBITUARY.

MR. F. A. CARRINGTON: 93.

Death has removed another very old colonist, in the person of Mr Frederick Alonzo Carrington, who died at his residence this (Monday) morning, in his ninety-fourth year. Mr Carrington was born at Chelmaford, Essex, England, in October, 1807, and was the son of Captain William Carrington, Barrackmaster at Douglas, Isle of Man, whose father and grandfather were Senior Prebendaries of Chancellors of the Diocese of Exeter and cadets of the family of Carringtons of Sponton in Yorkshire. Mr Carrington was specially instructed by the distinguished military engineer, surveyor, and draughtsman, Colonel Dawson,R.E., C.8., and entered the Ordinance Survey Office in January, 1826, being appointed to that position by the Duke of Wellington (tbe " Iron Duke "). Showing a natural ability for topographical delineation and survey work he soon attracted the attention of tho eminent engineers of the day, and when the Reform Bill was passed in 1832, he was selected by the Parliamentary Commissioners to describe the boundaries of the boroughs in thb districts from Bristol to Manchester. For his services on that occasion he received the special thanks of the Commissioners. Bis several acquirements and the particular gift he possessed of being able to accurately delineate a country, wad the reason he was selected by the Plymouth Company as its chief surveyor to go to New Zealand to choose/ a x site for the settlement the Company proposed forming there. On his at Wellington he "interviewed Colonel Wakefield, and obtained from him. all the information possible for the furtherance of the duties he had to perform ; and after securing the services of Mr Richard Barrett (the well-known and experienced whaler) to act as pilot and interpreter, he left Port Nicholson for Taranaki with the view of selecting a site for a new settlement, the pioneers of which were then making arrangements in England for emigrating to New Zealand. On February- 12, 1841 j Vlr F. A. Carriogton and family, to ' gether with his brother Mr Octarius Carrington (who was his chief assistant) and the survey party arrived off Ttfranaki. The ferns and undergrowth were thick over the land at the time, reaching even to the sea shore, so it "was a difficult matter obtain ' a -knowledge of the features of the country which is so essen- \ tial when having to fix the site of township. With great labour lines were cut through the dense vegetation, and a spot cleared — and after much difficulty the site for the Town of New Plymouth was laid out and sunreyed under Mr F. A. Carrington's directions. In September, 1843, Mr Carrington returned to England and on bis arrival in London he found that the Directors of tbe New Zealand Company (which had absorbed tbe Plymouth Company) were thinking of ceasing their functions for a time, and accordingly Mr Carrington retired from their service, receiving a very complimentary testimonial from the Directors. Mr F. A. Carrington was soon engaged in connection with the railways, a mania for making them having about that time commenced in Englaud. He surveyed lines, prepared plans, and made models of engineering works where difficulties occurred on the ground, so as to elucidate the same before the Railway Com mittees in. the Houses of Parliament; and some of these models, at the request of the Prince Consort, were sent to Buckingham Palace, and Afr Carrington was personally thanked and complimented by His Royal Highness. During the time he was in England (1844-61) Mr Catrington gave a good deal of his time and attention to New , Zealand matters, and tried to make Taranaki better known to the British public. Mr Carrington exhibited a bar of iron and some of the Taranaki ironsand at the Exhibition of 1851, when he called the attention of the Master-General of the Ordnance Department (Sir H. De la Beche) to it. Mr Carrington also had a map engraved from bis drawings showing the topographical features of the country around Taranaki. After visiting- California three different times from London, in connection with mines, waters-races, railways, etc., Mr Carrington again returned .to New Zealand, having been absent nearly fourteen years, his object, being the utilisation of the ironsand' and other matters in connection with the district; and being backed by men of capital and standing, who took great interest in the colony, hoped to start the iron indusiry in Taranaki. The North- Island was in a very unsettled state at the* time owing to the natives showing an antagonistic attitude towards the Europeans, which in 1860 ended in hostilities which lasted for ten years. In 1862 Mr Carrington was appointed Government Engineering Surveyor for Taranaki. and in that capacity carried out in connection with the military authorities the road construction necessary in the district. On peace being restored Mr Carrington turned his attention to .local matters, add consenting to be nomi nated as Superintendent of the province of Taranaki in 1869, he was returned by the electors and held that pdsition .till the provinces were abolished in 1876. Be was also elected to a seat in the -Souse of Representatives and held the position for several years. He retired from politics in 1880, finding that the late, hours and the excitement of Parliamentary "life were not conducive to his health. Seeing the necessity there was for harbour accommodation af Near Plymouth, Mr Carrington for years agitated iv the hope of getting protective works built that, shipping might visit the port in safety. During the .time he was in London in 1854-57, he was always urging the matter on those who had an interest in vthe district; and ( both as Superintendent arid member of the House he was persistent in his advocaov for a harbour being built at Taranaki. It was through his exertions that a fourth of tbe land revenue of the dis <r"ct was set aside for harbour purposes and a Harbour Board created which raised the money to carry out the work. On February 7th, 1881, V r F. A.Car- ' ring'on laid tbe first stone of the present strujfcure, thus crowning his labours as the founder of the Settlement of Taranaki. .The wife of the deceased gentleman died .'n 1888; by whom he had issue of six children — five daughters (one of whom is dead") and one son. Mr Carrington had two brothers with him in New Zealand — the late Mr Wellington Carrington, who died in February, 1891, and Mr Octavius Carrington, at present residing in this town. Mr Carrington's life has been an eventful oue. He was of. a cheery disposition, and as the "Father of tbe Settlement 1 ! (as he was very appropriately called in Taranaki) he almost up to the last took a great interest in the plane. Until a couple of years ago Mr Car riogton's was a familiar figure in New Plymouth, in the progress of which he was naturally , deeply interested, but latterly advancing -years have told upon him, and for a long time he has been almost oonfiied to his room, only occasionally being tteen, out in a Bath chair. Lately it was seen that the vital force was very nearly expended, and the old gentleman passed away peacefully in his sleep early this morning.

Astonishing accounts of the ef&tiftiy of the Great Canadian Seaweed Cure as a specific for Rheumatism and Rheumatic affection continue. The treatment of Rheumatism and Gout by. internal remedies has hitherto been uncertain;, but all doubt as to the value of the Canadian Cure" is now removed, it having completely cured,. many chronic cases. Sold by A . E. Svkes and all chemists. Wholesale, Kempthprne, Prosser, & jC0.. 0 Poor old China's gone to pieces, Of her vast possessions reft, Day by day hor power decreases, Soon there'll bo little left. Sha'U no longcr-be a nation. But for ever be obscure; Coughs and colds have no foundation. Do3ed with Woodt' Great-Peppermint Cuw.o

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Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., Taranaki Herald, Volume XLIX, Issue 11714, 15 July 1901

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1,311

OBITUARY. Taranaki Herald, Volume XLIX, Issue 11714, 15 July 1901

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