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THE COLONIAL PREMIERS AT HOME.

MR SEDDON BANQ (JETTED. [?ER PRESS ASSOCIATION.] London, July 9. — At a banquet organised by Mr W. P. Reeves, tendered to Mr Seddon at Holborn Restaurant, Sir James Ferguson presided, and amongst thoee present were Mr Thomas Mackenzie and the New Zealand contingent. Three hundred guests aat clown to dinner, the majority of whom ara interested in the New Zeiland produce tmde. The viaudß were largely composed of New Zealand produce. Mr Seddon, replying to the toast of his health, said he- was gratified to find the Maori section of tho contingent present. He would be no party to huckstering. Regal maintenance of the Empire was imperative and somothing should be 1 done to preserve British trade with colonies, especially when foreigners were fencing out colonial products by mea^s of obsolete ttaatiei. These were injurious to the Empire and ought to be denounced. Improved communication was needed and a Pacific cable was essential. There was nothing to prevent a twenty-five days service from Liverpool. Foreign subidiea granted to steamers was merely an indirect way of subsidising trade. It was the duty of tha Government to tee that British capital invested in mining operations in the coloniet was directed in legitimate channels.

The Maoris danced a haka before the guests amidst great applause.

Mr Goschen, who attended the final Conference of Premiers, declared that it \rat quite a rnia^pprehrtosiou to suppose that the Admiralty wanted more money from Australia. He was quite satisfied witn a renewal of the auxiliary agreement, because a great principle was involved. He was not disposed to insist on the Admiral of the Australian station having a freo hand to send the auxiliary vessels anywhere in war time, although it would bo a great help if such a oourse was followed. He strongly praisod the patriotism of Australia.

The Premiers, in reply, agreed to continue the existing arrangements. Mr Goschen announced thoint3ntion of the Admiralty to send a first-class cruiser as a flagship in the Australian wateis.

Tho Premiers have been banquetted by tha Cordwainora Company. Tbe Duke of Devonshire, who was amongst the guests, said (ho presence of the colonial troops was a revelation hitherto unrecognised in connection with the Imperial forces.

Mr Chamberlain said (he dominant note of the Jubilee Celebrations was tho Hnpreuia obligation of maintaining the tanity of the Kmpire. It was to tha interest of the cc lonies as well as the Mothar Country to strengthen the ties binding the Empire. The Federation of Australia and the South African States would be the first step towards Fedaration of the "firupire. The colonies must decide when they desired to s|»re Imperial privileges and responsibilities.

The Fabian Society entertained Mr Seddon at luncheon. Mr Seddon, responding to the toast of his health, claimed that progressive legislation had increased the wealth, contentment, and industrial prosperity in Hew Zealand.

Wellington, July 10.— The actingPremier has received the followiug cable from Mr Saddoii :— " Sworn in as Privy Councillor at Windsor on Wednesday. Personally presented the address of the Parliament of New Zealand. Her Majesty thanks the Legislative Council and House of Representatives. Mrs Sodden personally presented the women's address for which the Queen sends thanks.

It is expected that boring operations will be resumed at tha Petroleum Works on Monday.

In the trial of the compressed air motors on 125 th street line in. New York, the cars have made regular* daily trips for nearly eight months, having successfully completed a total mileage of 23,183 miles, and carried about 138,650 passengers.

A London inventor has devisad an immense lamp, which is compossd of 3000 pieces. It is 6ft high aojfcmeatures 3ft lOin in diameter. It it fed with lard oil, and the consumption is very small, its light being no powerful, that one may read by it at a distance of 600 ft.

The census recently taken in Russia gives the total population of the Empire as 129,211,000, of whom 64,616, 280 are men. In St. Petersburg the population is 1,267,023, in Moscow 988,610, in Warsaw 614,752, and Odessa 404,651 There are thirty-five towns having between 50,000 and 100,000 inhabitants.

Two new officers, Captain Wansbone and Lieutenant Buttimore, hav<j arrived to tak« command of the Salvation Army in New Plymouth. Both of them are single young men, of musical tastes, and bent upon infusing new life iato the work of the A?my here.

Mr R. Colemin, builder, asks us to contradiot a rumour which has by some means been in circulation that his son Willie wa* recently convicted of robbing a till. What gave rise to the report w«s presumably tho fact that a lad of tho same name was so convicted lately, but beyond the similarity of nsmes there was not tha least connection.

Captain Edwin wired at 12 41 p.m. today^ — Wind between south and east and north east at all places; barometer further rise at all places westward of Thames, Tauranga, and Nalson, and risa soon elsewhere; sea koavy on eastern coast of both islands, between Lyttelton and EafctCape, decreasing from thence northward and on all western coast; tides high on eastern coast of North Islaud, between Castlepoint and East Cape, moderate and decreasing everywhere else; unusually cold weather it to ba expected northwards of Thames and Manukau, and decreasing wind with upnaaally cold weather on the eaet coast between Castlepoint and East Cape, and frost to-night in all other parts of tho country.

The great progress made in wrecking appliances and their operation during the past ten years, is shown in the successful floating of the steamship Norito, which went on to Sable Island hnt September and was totully abandoned. So certain were the underwriters that tha ship would go to pieces on the sands and prove a total wreck 'that all insurance claims on steamer and cargo were settled within a short time aftei the disaster, and the Nerito's name removnd from the registers. The Merritt Wrecking Company, after an examination of the stranded vessel, decided that with a new system of pump* the company has lately perfected, the Nerito could be floated. An orrangamtot was made with Lloyd's agents whereby the wreckers were to receive 75 per cent, of the steamer's value in the event of their bringing hor to port. Some weeks ago operations were commenced, the company's powerful wrecking steamer, J. D. Jones, being employed on the work. The result iti that the Nerito has been towed into Halifax by the Jones, and after partial l epairs will be taken to New York. The Nerito is nearly 3000 tons gross, and is pratically a new vessel, having been built in Sunderland in 1890. This is the first instance on record where a ship once touching the dreaded sands of Sable Island has ever again seen service.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TH18970710.2.5

Bibliographic details

THE COLONIAL PREMIERS AT HOME., Taranaki Herald, Volume XLVI, Issue 10967, 10 July 1897

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1,132

THE COLONIAL PREMIERS AT HOME. Taranaki Herald, Volume XLVI, Issue 10967, 10 July 1897

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