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OBITUARY.

DEATLL OF MR. W. J. HURST, M.11.R. Tub death of Mr. W. J. Hurst, M.11.R. for Waiteinata,is announced as h.iving occurred nl Folkestone, England, on Thursday last, October 7th, at tho age of 57 years. The lato Mr. Hurst w.isa native of Berwick onTweed, and carried on a gi.iiu and seed business in Auckland for many jc.\r=<. He has been Mayor of that oiu, ami was a member of tho Provincial Ux'ocutivo under Mr. Gillies' Superintendency. He was a fluent spoaker, a persuasive debater, aud very popular with his constituents, to whoso interests ho gave assiduous attention. He was one of the celebrated Auckland four who went over from Sir George Grej to Sir John li.ill, .Mid has 6incu been a consistent suppoit-r of the Atkinson p.uty. He was returned at the last election as a supporter of M ijor Atkiuaoa. Mr. Hurst attended tho last subsioa of Parliament, but owing to his health not improving obtained leave ot absenct , mid went houu: via Sail Fiancisco. lie ws ot a jovial disposition, aud nude many i'lieudd duriug hi» uojomu in iho colony.

great bloodshed might ensue. On this particular occasion, owing to the good temper of both the natives and white people, fortunately there was but little actual disturbance. I have nothing to do with any supposed wrong you have against the Crown ; all I have to do is to take into account the facts upon which this proeecntion aro based. I am, however, at liberty to take into consideration the fact that you have pleaded guilty to the charge laid against you, and I entertain a hope that this is an indication that there will be no acts of a similar kind instigated by you. I propose, therefore, Only to pass what must be considered a very lenient sentence, but I feel bound at the same time to say that if another charge «f a similar kind is made, the Court that has to adjudicate upon the matter will no doubt pass a very much severer sentence. The sentence of the Court upon the charges on which you have pleaded guilty is that you be kept in the public prison — the Terrace Gaol — for three calendar months, ■ad that yon pay a fine of £100. Tttokowaru, I do not propose to make any farther observations to you beyond those I have made to Te Whiti, except as to the pnnishmont. You have pleaded Guilty, not only to forcible entry, but atoo to the offence of riot. I have considered it

.' proper to make a difference in the sentence passed upon Te Whiti to that which I shall pass upon you and the others. The sentence of th» Court upon you, Titokowarn, is that you be kept in the public prison for one calendar month, and that you pay a fine of £20. Ngahina, I say the same to you — that you be kept in > ihe public prison of Wellington for one month and thatyou payafipeof£2ooneach Connt of the indictment upon wbioh you have pleaded Guilty. His Honor repeated the sentence in all the other cases.

Te Iki— May I be allowed to make an explanation ? The Chief Justice — Theße sentences are lobe concurrent, and not separate. Each prisoner will undergo one month's imprisonment except in the casts of Te Whiti, who will undergo three months' imprisonftient. There is a formal sentence on each count, bat the sentences are to be concurrent. My intention also is, but for technical reasons I cannot enter it up as snob, that all the prisoners except To -Whiti shall only pay a fine of £20 each. Te Whiti will pay one of £100. Te Iki— What I wish to say is that I agree with what Te Whiti has said. I did not go on to the land to mak» a disturbaice,but to obtain my rights. This concluded the proceedings as far an tbe Court was concerned. The prisoßers bad all through been respectful and decorous in their behavior. As the decisions of the Court was made known to them they looked at Te Whiti as if waiting for him to tafee the next step. Te Whiti looked at the gaol warden, and apparently indicated with his hand that he thought he was to go somewhere outside the Court. The warder pointed to tho regions below. Te Whiti, apparently rather against his will, led ths way' down the steps. The olbers followed him, and the proceedings, kb far as the Court was concerned, were over.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TH18861009.2.14

Bibliographic details

OBITUARY., Taranaki Herald, Volume XXXV, Issue 7192, 9 October 1886

Word Count
752

OBITUARY. Taranaki Herald, Volume XXXV, Issue 7192, 9 October 1886

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