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THE GENERAL ELECTIONS.

NOMINATIONS FOR TnE DISTRICT

OF NEW PLYMOUTH. The nominations for the District of New Plymouth took place in the Court-room yesterday at noon. Tho Returning Officer (Mr. W. Rennelll) opened the proceedings by reading the writ authorising the elections. He then called upon the electors to nominate their candidates.

Mr. H. R. Richmond, in proposing Mr. Thomas Kelly, said he had known him for over twenty years. He had been astociated with him formerly in Provincial matters, and had found him an industrious, painstaking, hard-working, and plodding politician. He held the oflico of Provincial Secretary when he (Mr. R.) was Superintendent, and therefore could speak from personal observation. Since Mr. Kelly had been a member of the House, although he might have differed in some instances from his views, yet what Mr. Kelly had done was for the good of the district. On one occasion he went over to the other party in the House, and he blamed him for it ; but he had since ascertained that it was done for the good of the constituency he represented. With regard to the harbour, Mr. Kelly had been one of the most indefatigable workers. Of course^ Mr. Carrington was the principal mover in it, but Mr. Kelly in every way assisted in bringing about the result that had been achieved. He also assisted in negotiating the loan for the Harbour Works. He (Mr. R.) took a great interest in Education, and he understood that Mr. Kelly wished to see more economy used in that department. They all desired that, but he was opposed to seeing thesystem of free education abolished. If they looked at the qualifications of the other candidates, he could not see a better or more qualified man to represent them in the House. Mr. Kelly was one who did not go in for extravagance ; he had parliamentary experience, which the other candidates had not; and he had served them well in the past. He (Mr. R.) therefore saw no reason for changing, , and for those reasons he had much pleasure in proposing Mr. Thomas Kelly as a candidate to represent their district.

Mr. H. J. Honeyfield said he had much pleasure in seconding the nomination. He had known Mr. T. Kelly for nearly twenty years, and he was certain that he had never consciously done anything which was not for the good of the district. Ho thought if they sent Mr. Kelly down again they would be putting the right man in the right place, and that was their duty. It was a critical time just at present, and it was necessary they should put ' ta"e best man in the House. There were a good many sporting men in the community, and if they were going to send a horse to contest a race would they select his old codger — no, they would get a highly trained horse, such a» Mr. Standish'a Hormanby, one who they knew had been long in training, and send him. It was much the saoie in returning a member. What was the good of sending an untrained man to the House. Besides, Mr. Samuel could do more good for us here than by going away. They wanted Mr. Smith to look after the water mains, they could not spare him ; and Major Brown was wanted here likewise. Let them, then, send a trained man to the House— one who had served them well in the past ; and would do the same, he felt sure, in the future. Mr. H. McLean, proposed Edward Metcalf Smith as a candidate, and in doing bo said they might get a man with more knowledge, but he defied them to get a man with more energy. It had been a disaster not to get capable men to stand as candidates. Had it been otherwise this OOUniry would liavo boon mnra proafvarouo, as they would have returned better representatives. Mr. Smith might not perhaps bo tho ablest man they could chose, but he had energy could express their views. He understood the wants of the country, and he hoped that the working men would show their confidence in him by recordiug their vote into the ballot-box.

Mr. H. Rogers seconded tho nomination. He had been in the place four or five years, but had seen very little that Mr. Kelly had done for the district. The speaker then went on to refer, to the other candidates, and concluded by saying that he hoped to see Mr. Smith's name at the top of the poll. Mr. H. T. Yates proposed Charles Brown a 8 a candidate. He said he had known him for over thirty yearß, and found him a thoroughly just and upright man in business. He was the first Superintendent of the Vxvrluve, and hnd done a great deal of fifod in the place. , air. Paul said as it appeared that Major : Brown's seconder had not attended, he would second his nomination. He had always found Major Brown to be upright and straightforward in business dealing. Mr. Standish proposed Oliver Samuel as a candidate. It had been stated that it was unwise to send to the House untried men. but if they followed that idea they would never have any but the old members to re > -esc it them. Ho did not agree with that view. During the short time Mr. Samuel had been amongst them he had taken a great interest in public affairs, and in his profession had made his mark. He had great energy, and whatever he took in hand he endeavoured to carry out. Another reason why it was desirable to have a change in their members was that when they had been in for any great length of time they got connected with one party, that they went on at a jog trot pace and lost that energy with which a new member would naturally be imbued. The speaker then went on to show what connection Mr. Kelly had with tho harbour, intimating that it was to Mr. Carrington the credit was due, as well as Major Atkinson. [Mr. Caurinoton : It was Sir Julius Yogel who passed the Bill through the House to get us the endowment] When the endowment was in jeopardy and a deputation went down to Wellington it was owing to the enery thrown into the matter by Major Atkinson that the endowment was preserved to the district. lie would not say that Mr, Kelly had net done his duty on that occasion, but Mr. Samuel had done more than his duty. If they put Mr. Samuel in, it was probable ho would make an excellent member. It was very likely that important questions would arise during tho ensuing Parliament, and he would be as well able as any other man to deal with them. It was on these grounds that he thought they could not do better than elect Mr. Samuel as their representative in the new Parliament.

Mr. E. Veale seconded tho nomination of Mr. Samuel. Ho said Mr. Kelly, he considered, was a good man, but Mr. Samuel was a better one. He thought that it was unwise of them to say that because ono iimn had been twenty-live years in a seat that thoy should not replace him by another. If they never had a change, why the members would be fossilized. When the requisition asking Mr. Samuel to stand was brought round, he had refused to sign it till ho had heard tho enndidates speak ; and, having dono so, ho now decided to support Mr. Samuel, who ho felt sure would do bettor in the future than Mr. Kelly had done in tho past. Mr. Kelt,y, after a few introductory remarks, in which he referred to some of his former friends deserting him, und on his determination to Bink or swim on his opinions, said who ovor heard of a Kolly that had not a boat of his own. Ho would nail his colors to the must, so that the people could eeo them, and would trust in Providence and tho ballotbox, and paddle his own canoe. So far ho had been justified by tho result. The real voice of the electors was with him, and hiß opponents know it. Had he

weakly knuckled down to their political creed, and promised to aid them to destroy free primary education, and relief of their property from all direct taxation, and place the burden on the dutiable goods they consume, they would have been his best and most devoted f riends. But when he stood up for the rights of the people, and would not yield an inch, but would rather Bacrifice their strong . support than betray them, then he was opposed by a large section of tho monied interest and their small supporters. He would now deal with the gentlemen who opposed him. He listened to tho speech on Saturday,, with" pleasure in one sense, and with disappointment in another sense. The pleasure was occasioned by tho exceedingly fair way in which Mr. Samuel dealt with himself (Mr. X.) as one of the candidates. He attacked his political principles, his political judgment, and his political conduct generally, as he anticipated frem his position aB a member of a learned profession and an educated man — j he > did not descend to personalities outside of his position as a public man. On that occasion he would take the same line in fact ashe had always taken, and if he laid his hand on him heavily, it would only be on his political views, on his politicul inconsistencies and errors, and not on the man himself. Mr. Samuel had had the advantage as one of the "crew of the ark," of seeing all the replies given to the politicalassociation on the questions submitted. He heard the private discussion of the association and then for the first time formulated his political creed. That had to him been a great advantage. His first exposition of political policy was to be found in tlie address. The second in his speech, and the third that day. He states in his adress that with regurd to Education he was in favor of largely reducing the expenditure, and would be satisfied with no Bmall saving. He would give free education so far as reading, writing, and arithmetic, was concerned, but all higher education, should be abolished except the granting of scholarships. Direot taxation on property and land he was opposed to, and would abolish it and replace it — if necessary — by increasing the customs duties and increased stamp duties. In his (Mr. X's) speech he showed that he would have to provide £400,000 by that policy, that is £260,000 property tax and £150,000 deficiency on last year, now paid by bills falling due during the year ; and that by customs duties and stamps he could not raise this money without driving the people to the verge of open rebellion. That assertion had evidently staggered him, for in his speech he had declared that he would not double the tax on the poor man's tea and sugar, but that he woiild place it on luxuries used by the rich, andtmake them pay it, and the balance be would raise by stamps on legacies. Ho (Mr. X.) had driven him out of one position and he would easily drive him out of the one he hud now taken up. On education he had also shifted his ground. He was now in favor of teaching up to the fourth standard instead of the " 3 R's," with which he began. He (Mr. X.) had converted him. He had conceded almost the whole position, for if education was given free to that standard he can save only a trifle on the education! vote, as Colonel Trimble had clearly sbo an. Taking the number of scholars at 86,000 attending the public schoos there were of these only 3000 were in the sth and 6th "standards, so that the Colony would only save the capitation grant on their children and transfer it to their parents. So that primary education, with Mr. Samuel's reduction, would still cost the Consolidated Fund £290,000 without calculating the interest on. the total coßt of school buildings equal to £30,000 also paid out of the ConsnlirlntA/l JTiind. and which cannot be reduced eves if the whole system was swept away. He asked after all the parade and promp of Mr. Samuel's declamation, was not that a most lame and impotent conclusion only £12,000 saved. He would seriously ask Mr. Samuel if he really knew what he was talking about when he spoke of the fourth standard. Would it surprise his learned friend to know that to be well up in the fourth standard was almost a liberal education, and would utmost fit him for his (Mr. Samuel's) learned profession if Latin and French were only added. — [Mr. Kelly here read a formidable list of subjects including elementary physical science, physiology, and the principle divisions of the animal'and of the vegetable kingdoms] . — This was a tremendous leap in advance of the " 3 R's." Mr. Samuel read out a confused heap of figures to show that Colonel Trimble was not correct in his statement of the cost of education, and challenged him (Mr. X.) to check them. He would do so. He had enquired independent of Colonel Trimble, but he mainly agreed with him, and as ho had taken from the actual expenditure of 1883-4, the figures are reliable. Mr. Samuel goes to the wrong source for information of actual expenditure when he draws from reports ; he should go to the Treasury. The total payments out of the consolidated fund for primary education, including head office, public schools, native schools, and deaf and dumb institution, was £302,979 ; High Schools, £4000 ; for libraries, £6000 ; for the Auckland University, £4000 ; and the New Zealand University, £3000 ; interest on school buildings, £30,000. Out of educational reserves we have £25,000 rent for primary, and £35,000 rent for high education, including secondary reserves, High School reserves, University reserves, and tho Colleges of Canterbury and Wellington, making a grand total of £409,979,- of which may be reduced by the library vote, | as unnecessary ; so that practically only £344,000 comes out of the pockets of the taxpayers. And with respect to higher education, does Mr. Samuel think for one moment that he would — if member for New Plymouth— dare to rise in the House and propose to take away from Otago and Canterbury their reserver made during the Provincial days, for higher education ? He would be a bold and foolish man if he did. Suppose an Otago member proposed to do away with the 25 per cent, of the land revenue of Taranaki for making a harbour at New Plymouth, ho would look very foolish. How could he defend the 25 per cent, for New Plymouth if he proposed to rob Otago and Canterbury of their endowments? And if he would not do this, what practical utility is there in his empty declamation about higher education ? He dare not lift his voice in the House to propose such a thing, the result would j be far too serious for weak Taranaki to ! contemplate. Having demolished Mr. Samuel's education policy, and proved he could do no more than he (Mr, X.) proposed, that is make reductions on ceneral administration and school age,he would now deal with his new plan of shifting tho burden of the Property Tax on to luxuries and inheritances. Ho found that the working man would not stand a double tax on sugnr nnd ten, nnd, being a friend of tho working man, he gives way at once. He had gone carefully over the import list of 1884 and taken down the whole of what may be deemed luxuries, outside of wines, spirits, tobacco, cigars, and beer, which are at present taxed to the utmost limit. [Mr. Kolly hero read tho list]. It would be seen that tho total import value was £272,964, paying a duty of £44,063, or a little ovor 16 per cent, on declared value ; before these goods reached the consumer each £100 of original valuo would be increased by tho duty, nnd three separate prolits, viz., the importer, the merchant, and tho retail dealer, making tho £100 equal at least to £150 cost to tho consumer. Supposing tho duties wero doubled tho first effect would be at onco to reduce the consumption, and instead of the Slate receiving twice £44,000, the probability is it would receive only £60,000, or £15,000

to redeem the Property Tax ; the effect being to deprive the working classes of all luxuries of an innocent character. No feather and nice bonnets, clothing for the wives and daughters of the working man to adorn their beauty. He did not see how this was likely "to affect the working man, except to make him angry" at Mr. Samuel for attempting to convert good-lpoking smartly-dressed girls into specimens of unadorned beauty. AH that was left now was to throw this sum of £400,000 on to the widows and orphans of the deceased property-holder. The proposal was so unfair 'that he had only to mention it to show how absurd it was. He had now done with Mr. Samuel's political policy, and showed how unsound it was. With respect to Mr. Smith he had little to say, as he cod cedes more than Mr. Samuel in education, and goes to the sixth standard, and as he also goes in for technical education there was little difference between them on the question of education. With respect to the Property Tax they were altogether ,ot issue. He argues that the working man would not mind additional Customs duties, because his wages would be raised in consequence of the assumed introduction of capital for industrial purposes, It was here that Mr. Smith was mistaken. Men did not come with large capital to enter into speculative industries, but to lend it out on interest for as high a rate of interest as they could get, and as the price of money was up to from 8 to 10 per cent, before the Property Tax was imposed, and remains at that now, there was no proof whatever that more 'hroney would come in for in vestment if the tax was done away with. Mr. Smith's scheme forc'arrying on public works by aid of paper Adne/ was not at all new. It has .been tried before, and proved a perfect failure. If these notes were not secured on the general revenue of the Colony they would have no value for outside purchasers ; and if they were so secured it would only be a clumsy way of borrowing, which could be • r done much better, and on cheaper terms, in the London market. The proposal was not worthy of serious consideration. Major Brown considers the fourth standard like Mr. Samuel, therefore there is no reason for any criticism. As he has refrained from addressing the public, he (Mr. X.) did not know how he was going to provide for the deficiency and the £260,000 now levied on property. So far as the candidates are concerned he had finished. He was happy to say he had not been quite deserted by men of property or all professional men. His friends could rise above smalt petty considerations when the interest of the public was at stake. Did his opponents think that the independent electors of the town were" to' be rounded up by them like a drove of bullocks with the crack of a stock-whip to vote against him (Mr. X.) ? Did they think that touting for votes at the Btreet corners, and the covert distribution of falsehoods, with a slight varrrsh of truth, is going to poison the minds of fair and honest men against him ? j Did they think there was no protection from intimidation and pressure in the ballot-box, and that men would not vote as they think right ? If they did Jihey were deceived. Truth would prevail in the end. He now. left the matter in the electors hands. They were the judges. He appealed to the people. They were sound at heart in politics, in sentiment, and in morality. Ho did not approve of a personal canvass. He thought it was an undue interference with the principle of voting by ballot to ask any person to disclose who he was in favour of. The'ballot was given for the protection of the humblest voter, and he hoped they would use it in its proper sense. If his (Mr. K'a) principles were in accord with the electors —if they thought that, oil the whole, he Waß the. br«t fitted- to do their wuik, ho asked them each and all to vote for him. He concluded by again thanking them for the gene/ous confidence they had shown him in the past.

Mr. E; M. Smith said he would not occupy their time at any length, 'as he should probably take another opportunity of addressing them again.. He Bhould confine himself to simply pointing out a few erroneous statements Mr, Kelly had made. Mr. Kelly tried to make it out that it was inconsistent on his (Mr. S.s) part to advocate the doing " away with a property tax, if- he did not' show how the amount- was to be made Up. - r Why not reduce the amount for Education. That would alone make it up. He (Mr. S.) said it was necessary to reduce' r the extravagant expenditure on Education/ If ithat was not enough, then' t a land, tax might be raised, or a tax levied on some articles of luxury. It did not want the Customs raised on such articles *s ' Mr. Kelly had mentioned, but on -such as would, promote local industries. Mr. Kelly had said hie (Mr. S.s) views were not to the interest of the working man. -But he wan certain that they were; and that the repeal of the Property Tax would be most beneficial, I because, how could they expect capitalists to coiae to tho Colony to. -invest their money if it was to be 'taxed. Mr. Kelly said ho was opposed to tho perpetual leasing system, and thought -the deferred payment was the best. "Did he tell them that .the deferred payment' selector had to pay fifty per cent more than he who purchased for cash. He said lie 'would allow any person to go into the bush and fall a few treea for himself, and when they wanted to take the land for the public— they would take it for the value of .the bush that had been fallen. Mr. Richmond attempted to give the electors Mr. Kelly's history and tell them what he had done, but he did not tell them what he had forgotten to do. He could tell tho electors it was proposed by the Provincial Council to borrow £350,000 for the harbour, but he got up in that room and said ho was opposed to borrowing money and getting into debt. Neither did Mr. Standish tell them that before Mr. Carrington made the harbor a fact that Mr. Kelly went about sneering at the idea. Mr. Carrington was not a supporter of his, but he would say that to him was due the credit forgetting the harbour. There was another one also who was entitled to their thanks— Sir George Grey. But for him they would have lost the endowment. What has Mr. Kelly done for the harbour ? . Why only last session Mr. Waterhouse had made an attack on it. Did Mr. Kelly get up and reply to him ? No 1 he was sitting in his Committee room. Had he (Mr. S.) been there he would have given Mr. Waterhouse all the information he required ; he would have told him how matters stood. [A Voice : Waterhouso is in the Council ?] Never mind, he would have set him right had he been there, and not like Mr. Kelly have been silent. It was said that it was necessary to send Mr. Kelly again in the House, because he had experience. But what had he done in the past ? Had he mado the place progress as it ought to have dono ; had ho fostered industries ; had he assisted to develop the resource of the place. Ho (Mr. S.) had brought under his notice samples of cement made in this place. The cement the Harbour Board was using cost 16s. Bd. a barrel ; well, what did their late momber toll him (Mr. S.) why that na it took the English Bixty years to have faith in their cement, it would take sixty years bofoio they would hovo faith in that manufacture m this place. With regard to Major Brown ho was an old politician, but ho was v crafty one. lie hnd the advantage of them a 1 because ho held his meeting after they nil had spoken. Ho must, however, show them that ho would not bo the man for them to roturn. He held in his hand a report of tho West Coast Native Commission —one and all believed that it was. an honost production. Those who had not rrnd it should get ;i copy and do ho ; what did Sir W. Fox say, "why that Major Brown wanted a hundred thousand acreß of land

which he was not entitled to." Mr. Smith after making a series of serious charges — proceeded to say that he advised Major Brown to retire for the remainder of his life to the banks of the Henui. It had been said that if little " E. M." got returned and went to Wellington, he would be thought nothing of. He could tell them that he knew most of them in Wellington who were worth knowing. He knew Sir George Grey from the first day he landed in New Zealand, and when Sir. George came to New Plyi.iouth he went to the iron works, and he listened to him attentively while he explained how the working of the ironsand could be made beneficial to the colony. Mr. Standish wanted to get him away, but Sir George sat down and listened to him. He was intimate with Sir Julius Yogel and Sir W. Fox, and had hours of conversation with them in their private rooms. He was also acquainted with Major Atkinson, and was not afraid to ask him questions at his meetings. To show how much he was thought of since the election, he had received a letter from the Government offering to give a contract to him for the making of railway carriages. But it was nojgood answering it now, for \vhat would be Major Atkinson's position in the House when it met? Then there was his late commander, Colonel Whitmore. Ha (Mr. S.) was then armourer in charge of the small arms, and Colonel Whitmore was aide-de-camp to General Cameron. Well, when that brave officer was at the head of the British forces, and went into the field of battle to fight the enemy — where was he (Mr! S.) ? Why, in the camp to be sure. (Roars of laughter.) More than that, he stopped in the camp (Continued laughter.) Had he given way to his feelings he would have been the foremost man in the ranks — but duty compelled him to remain in charge of the small arms and ammunition. What would be the good of sending Mr. Samuel down to Wellington. He would be passing his time amongst the upper crust, doing nothing, but he (Mr.S ) would be at work, actively engaged in looking after the interests of the district. After a few more remarks of a personal nature in reference to some of those who had spoken, Mr. Smith concluded by saying he hoped they would return him by at least four hundred votes. Major C. Brown said before he commenced he must thank Mr. Paul for the handsome manner he had seconded his nomination, owing to the party who had consented to do so being absent. He would now refer to the remarks made by Mr. Kelly and Mr. Smith as to his being crafty in not holding his meeting before tho nominations, so that they could reply ,to any of his strictures. The reason for his chosing Monday was owing to one of the reporters saying to him that as most of the candidates were addressing the electors last week it would be difficult to get all the speeches, and being under the impression that the nomination day was Tuesday, he had called his meeting for that night. Mr. Kelly said that if the Property Tax was to be abolished what was to take its place. If the amount could not be made up by economising in the various departments, then he would be in favour of a land tax. He was formerly in favour of a land tax, but he had given it up, as he had no support on the question on the last •occasion when he stood for a seat in the House. Mr. Kelly made a point in stating that ,he would not make a personal canvass. But he (Mr. Kelly) had done so. He could remind him that he had sent a circular to them through the post, asking them for their vote ; and what was that but canvassing?' At his meeting Mr. Samuel had in a casual way said that he intended to vote for him (Major B.), and he would vote for Mr. Samuel. Supporters on each gide, it appeared, had obje'eted to this course, aud that bud bucii alterud. It had been brought against him as a crime that he had held high positions in the Colony. If he had done so, which was more than perhaps many could say, it was owing to the bone and muscle of the public. In former daj's. when he was selected to represent them, it was the voice of the people who returned him — the bone and muscle of the place who had given him those high positions which had been referred to. If it had not been for their support, he should - not have attained them. It had been said that he was of a grasping nature. When he was Superintendent of the Province, and commander of the militia, he left portions of the pay attached to both offices in the Treasury because he thought he was not entitled to it. There was £100 ia one instance and £200 in another., He would go on if they chose, for he could abstain from food a length of time, but as he would have to speak again that evening, perhaps they would prefer to hear him more fully then. [A Voice : This evening will do.] He would then refer to the West Coast Commission, and go much more fully into that question than -he could then. He left the result of the election to them, which, after they had heard him, he thought would be in his favour.

Mr. 0. Samuel said the position he had taken apon himself was by no means a pleasant one, and, but for the circumstances, it was one he would never have thought of assuming. It had been said it might affect his business, and that he would loso money by entering into politics, but he undertook the duty as a citizen — because other better men he could not get to come forward. They were passing through a severe commercial depression— and they were told to be economical and thrifty, and all would come out right — and the 6 afterwards the Government said, "but you must pay another tax. If they went on in this way much longer they would have nothing to pay with. They had better go away to another place than continue under such a state of things. It was desirable that now a new Parliament was being formed that there should also be a change in its members. Those who were continually being returned were apt to get wedded to a party, and there was no separating them from it. By sending new men they sent new ideas to Parliament, and that alon« was a public benefit. If they returned him to Parliament this time, he would not ask them to do so again. He thought a change was necessary, and that was why he 'had consented to stand. It had been asked what good had the Private Political Association, as it was called, done. He considered it had effected good. He would not say that it ought to be made a practice of calling these private meetings, but till some available means existed where political matters could be discussed and subjects ventilated it was the best course that could be adopted. The outcome of that meeting- was that it was desirable a new representative should go to Parliament next session. The meeting was not a class meeting. The names were selected from Wise's directory. It proved not very correct. Many names wero omitted which should have been included. But what was dono was done for tho best. It was very conclusive to those who met, that amongst the candidates who had announced themselves, that the sitting Member would be again j returned. It had been usked what good j had |tho meeting done. It had, he considered, dono a great deal of good. It had drawn up a programme on which the views of the various candidates had been elicited. It was from it that Mr. Kelly hnd given tho public his political views ; and even Colonel Trimblo had spoken chiefly from the texts they had formulated. The views did not meet the approval of tho electors, and a number of gentlemen had waited upon him nnd aaked him to como forward. He hoped that soiucouo else, who would have their confidenro, would lie induced to stand; und ho tried his bent to get another gentleman to do so. Tho feeling was that a change was necossury, and those gontle-

ui3n said that if! the candidates then up went to the poll, that Mr. Kelly was suro to be returned. He asked if they felt sure o£ that, and they all seemed to be of that opinion. He then replied, that if it was the wish of the electors, and thej' said so by requisition, he would accede to their wishes. The next day he was met ia the street, by a working man, who said that he heard that he (Mr. S.) was going to stand. He rflplied that he had agreed to do so. The party replied, " What ia the use of your going : let some one go who can afford it." Ho (Mr. S.) replied, that it was true ho should Ibe a great loser, but in a' time like the present, it behove everyone to make a sacrifice, and that by | a better Btato of things being brought about he should also benefit by it. The reason why they could not get able men was that so few could afford to give up their time to the work. He would get nothing by going down to Wellington except what he should benefit by the prosperity of the district which they would all share in. Mr. Kelly had said that he did not understand the accounts. Was it necessary that an ex-member should be sent because the ' accounts of the Colony were so ' complicated that no one outside the House . were v able to understand them. The , accounts should he so simple that' oveiyone could understand them. The accounts as they were produced were most perplexing to look through. He had gone through the Education Reportand collected the amounts of: expenditure on education, but they were told that^ they must not go to that document for their information but to another one. Mr. Kelly said that only £499,402 had been expended, but the gentlemen who were connected with the newspapers here, who were careful and painstaking stated that the sum was £596,44.4. He put that before them to show thai he alone was not deceived by the manner the accounts were complicated. Mr. Kelly says they could not do away with the property tax. He was going to support Sir Julius Yogel, and he said he could do away with the property'tax, and no doubt he would find some more equitable tax which would supply its place. If they were all like Mr. Kelly they would not progress, but would continue going on as they were. Mr. Kelly said they might economise by cutting off the grant for free libraries. That was the last item on the list that he would touch. There were 'men like Mr. Smith who were anxieus'to make themselves informed on matters — who had to run about from one person to tho other to borrow papers and books. Then Mr. Kelly thought to make a point by saying he wished to tax the widows and orphans ; but there was no legacy duty charged to ' widows — and, as for orphans, why they all were orphans, or would be one day, and he thought that those who we're left legacies were very well able to pay the tax. It did not suit every one to go to tho House, and he did not ,iotend to be their member for seventeen years. If they returned him he "would do his duty, and look after the interests of the district, and he hoped he would be able to show he had done something when he met them at the end of his term. It was necessary that new men should be returned, if it was only to break up the present cliques that existed. If they put him in he would do his best to carry that out. After a few more remarks, in which Mr. Samuel showed that he was not unkuown in Wellington ; that he had been in the Civil Service ; and also when studying for his profession had interested himself in politics, he co eluded by asking the electors if theythought him worthy of their suffrages to return him as their representative. '

The candidates having all addressed the electors, a show of hands was called for, which the Returning Officer v declared as follows :— Samuel, 28 ; Smith, 17, Kelly, 14 ; Brown, 6. Messrs. McLean and Rogers demanded a poll on behalf of Mr. E. M. Smith.

A vote of thanks to the Returning Officer concluded the business.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TH18840715.2.10

Bibliographic details

THE GENERAL ELECTIONS., Taranaki Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 6503, 15 July 1884

Word Count
6,424

THE GENERAL ELECTIONS. Taranaki Herald, Volume XXXII, Issue 6503, 15 July 1884

Working