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Mr. T. Kelly, M.H.R., announces that he

will address the electors in the Institute on Tuesday week, the sth December, at 7 p.m. The Art Union op London.— Mr. C. Reunell, the agent here for the London Art Union, has now on exhihition a large engraving taken from the oil paiuting of Mr. E. Armitage, K.A., of " Joseph aud Mary," aud which is valued at £100. A copy of this print will be given to overy subscriber to the Art Union, besides having one chance iv the distribution of prizes at the annual meetiug in London iv April next. The engraving represents Jose'i h. and Mary who, on thuir way back to Nazareth missing "the child Jesus," returns to Jerusalem t seeking him. Weary with the long journey over the hot plains of Palestine, Mary, is represented in the engraving as resting her hand on the margin of the wall, whilst asking the womeu, who have come to fill their waterjars, for any tidings of her son, whilst Joseph, leaning on his staff, is proceeding forward. to prosecute the search. The figure of Mary ib unsurpassed in loveliness aud • grace — the anxious inquiry expressed iv her countenauce aud the weariness of travel, are admirably rendered-*— and it will compare, not unfavourably, with the conceptions of the greatest artists. We would advise all who are fond of beautiful pictures to visit Mr. Ilenuell's office aud see this, and they will bo tempted to become subscriber to the Art Union- iu order to obtain it. Death op Mil. John Millar, F.S.A.— We learn from our Nelson exchanges that Mr. Millar, C.E.F.S.A., who wasengageil to reporton the waterworks for New flyniouth, died in Nelsou last Wednesday. Tho Evening Post, referring to him, snys: — "Only a few months ago, Mr. Millar paid a visit to Wellington, during which lie delivered a lecture on tho subject of water faupply and drainage, and it I that time ho was as halo and hearty as at auy time during his later life, but shortly aE(«r his I return to Nelson ho became ill, and continued ! so, with alight intervals of recovery, uutil his i death, which had for some days been expected, i Mr. Millar-'s counection with this colouy hns exteuded over 15 years, his iiret professional engagement being iv Dunedin, where be wan City Engineer at the time the greater part of the work of street formntiou and drainage was carried out. Contemporaneously with the discharge of his duties in Dunedin, he acted as consulting engineer for the municipality of Port Chalmers. During his-stay in that city he made many friends, and was for 6ome time one of its representatives in tho Provincial Council of Otago. From Dunedin, after several years' private practice, he weut to Wauganui, where he was for some time city engineer, and afterwards, with too little suspicion of his surroundings, he accepted the appointment of Provincial Engineer iv Nelsou. For a number of years previous to his arrival in New Zealand he had carried on his profession in Melbourno, in connection with the Van Yean waterworks, and with the scheme of conducting docks which it is still-contem-plated to carry out, and probably on the plant he had long ago prepared, one of the last works to which he devoted himself beiug a revisal of these plans, undertaken at the request of the Victorian Ministry. Mr. Millai was a man of most active spirit, and in its exercise he frequently got into controversy with others, but in private life he was one of the most nminble aud generous-hearted men that could be met with, aud his friendships, wherever he resided, were numerous ' and lastiug." Mr. Henderson, member of the Institute of Civil Engineers, and managing partner of the railway contracting firm of Brogden aud Sons, of London, is at present in Brisbane, for the purpose of negotiating with the Government for the construction of the several railways, bills for which are now before Parliament. Mr. Henderson was a pupil of Sir John Hawkehaw, Past-president of the Institute of Civil Engineers, London, and associated with Mr. Brunlees, Vice-president of the Institute, in carrying to a successful issue the S«in Paulo Railway, Braail — involving an expenditure pf , two and a-hu!£ millions sterling. It may be interesting to note that Sir John Hawkshaw aud Mr. Brunlees are now joiut ougineers for the gigantic scheme of connecting Englaud aud France by a luunel uudur the English Channel. Mr. Henderson was closely couuected with the firm of Peto, Brassoy^ and, Beite, on the Grand Trunk and other railway contracts of large extent in Canada, and New' Brunswick. Hydraulic, railway, and various public works were undertaken and completed by him in Germany and Holland at a cost of over one milliou sterling. He lately has been actively engugeii on the construction, for his firm in New Zealand, of two hundred and fifty miles of railways, tho contracts for which were nrranged io- Londou by Sir Julius Yogel aud tho Messrs. Brogdou, • the estimated expenditure beiug over one million. In order to expedite tho construction of the work Messrs. Brogden introduced, at the request of the New Zealand Government, twelve hundred immigrants. Various large harbour and other works have also been undertaken by this firm in New Zealand. Largo works for the exteniiivo reclamation of laud in Ireland have boon undertaken by this firm on their own account. The firm of Brogden and Sons is also largely engaged iv the coal and irou trade of South Wales and Lancashire, ouaploying over 6,000 handti. ■ Id connection with thcae works they have constructed several miles of railway, and the harbour of Fort Cawl, iv the former district, also the Ulverston nnd Lanouotar railway, aoross the treaoherous sands of Moreonrabe Bay, in the latter. Tho Uivereton railway alono cost £400,000. la neither of these undertakings did the firm ask or receive any financial nssistanco from tho public. They wero constructed on thoir own responsibility, aud proved exceedingly profitable. The Mossrs. Brogden are now busily engaged on an important link in tho railway communication of the Continent in Holland. These and other enterprises of great moment in Russia and other countries, bear conclusive witness to the energy nnd capacity of tho Messrs. Brogden. — Brisbane Courier., Octobor 20. PORRIDGE.— It is to such unhappy creatures, who cannot eat .without feeling that they have Bwallowcd so much load, flowed by a train of symptoms compendiously called '.'bilious," that wo would point out the merits of porridge,

.. DEATH OF MR. 0. P. ;Hl|RSTjiO|jsE. {: Otm telegrams nnnounee tile' death of ISJfr. Charlea Flinders Hursthouse, a, gentleman well known both in England and New Zealand for the -part he has ta^on in promoting- the ..settlement of this Coiony — particularly this portion of it. He died in Wellington on Thursday last, at the age of sixty-four years. Mr. Hurstbouso came out to New Zealand first übout the year 1842, landing in Nelson with his brother. They thenweutou to Wellington, and afterwards walked' overland to this settlement, and during the five years he was settled here he twice visited Sydney. At the fatter* end of IS4S he again left for England, with the idea of persuading other members of his family to emigrate here. It was then that^he published a book entitled, "An Account of the Settlement of New Plymouth," which had a large circulation and was" well reviewed. It was at this time ' that the directors of the then New Zealand Com, pany engaged ,him to lecture in country districts of England, and he at once engaged heart and soul iv a work for which by his acknowledged abilities as a lecturer he was so admirably fitted, and the Sheffield Free Press in referring to one of his lectures says, " His Btyle is graphic aud lively, his ndvice to emigrants shrewd and sensible, and his general facts and observations are complete and reliable." In the summer of 1854. ho again left England in the ship ' Joseph Fletcher' with sevoral other members of, his family, and arrived here on the 4th October of that year. Mr. Hursthouse's visit on that occassion was only a temporary one, his intention being to make a tour of thn , Colonj', with the view of betteriug his information as to the position and prosperity of the several districts. Having done' this he returned to Euglnnd where he wrote a book entitled " New Zealand, the Britaili of the South." Thia volume has been considered h standard work on New Zealand, nud on its appearing both the metropolitans, and Country newspapers spoke highly of the merits of the book. The volume went through two editions, and from its opening chapter we take the following outline of Mr. Hurethouae's biography, which will also give a very good idea of hia pleasing style of writing : — "Lincolnshire graziers for generations, we had once a nice little estate there ; but times went wrong with vs — we were a decaying family — emigration seemed the only medicine to work our cure; and when about nineteen I was despatched to America, partly to see what America was like. I looked about for a year or so in the Cauadas and the States, and though I thought some of the western districts were fine laud, yet the four months' bitter winter they were subjected to struck me as being bad both for man and beabt; and when I reached honie again a, family council yotcd that our emigration to America would be a mistake, and that we had better try and struggle on in the old country rather than go farther and fare worse Some while after this, however, New Zealand began to be talked of: a 'brother of the present peer, Lord Petre, h.-id written a capital little book on the country; ho was returning there, too ; aud after some consideration a married brother and myself (I meanwhile having graduated as a carpenter) determined to go with him. On our way out, calling at the Cape to purchose horses, we saw something of this flue African colony. On reaching New Zealaud we bought a wild land, and at once went to work oh' it. Here, ploughing, sowing, renping, mowing, working harder perhaps thau many a day labourer, we were occupied five years, during which period I was twice over in Australia — ODce briuging back sheep and cattle. At the expiration of this period, liking the country as we did, and the early troubles of the young colony seeming pretty well over, it was thought that the time had come when certaiu other members of our family might safely join ua. Being a bachelor myself, with no heavy baggage/ Ino "impedimenta"' to move about— if I may I make so ungullant nn observation— l returned to England, pnrtly to start them off;' nud in the summer 1b54, my father, and a party of some dozen brothers and sisters, and cousins and second cousins, sailed to join us in New Zealand. I was, however, compelled to remain iv England, and not wishing to be idle, I pnrtly employed myself in promoting New Zealand colonisation, and thus was 1 brought into personal commuuication with ; numbers of emigrants of all grades and i classes, acquired some further experience of the , various requirements and details of ' emigration. At last, some little works which | 1 had written on colonial and emigration I subject, being rather favourably received by , the press aud the public, the "cacoelhes scribeudi" was inflamed ; aud having reason , to believe tha£ a practical book on New Zea- , land might iuterest a portion of the emigraut public, I was induced to attempt the production of oue. Feeling, however, that I could not satisfactorily perform, the tnsk without revisiting the Colony aud seeing for m)self what progress had been made in mv absence, I made a second trip to New Zealand. This time I visited all tlio chief settle-. mentß of the ' Colony, and was much struck with the great progress which had been made during my abseuce. On reaching England again my' work was published. Whilst in Englaud he wrote several pamphlets—all hearing on New Zealand— and defended the Colony more than once by, means of letters sent _to the lead jug journals, ifTLofiiaofi; ~Fbi r £his'"P*rbvincVnT- CounoiFof ' Taranaki, oa- v thq ,13th May, 1869, pnssed a resolution thanking him, for the deep interest which he had taken. in behalf the Colony for twenty-five yeara. ,Jn I^B7o, after an absence of fifteen years, 'again returned to New. Zealand, arriving at Wellington in the" 1 Halcioue' iv September of that year, aud after a'bripf stay came on to New Plymouth, where ho remained till a little over a year since. As far as we can learn, the following are the names of the works of which Mr. HtirsthoxWwas the author: — "An Account of the Settlement of Now Plymouth," 1849; " New .Zealand, the Britaiu of the South," 1860; "totter to Austr.iliau Colonists," 18G7; "Th 6 Incorporation of Britain'a Colonial iuto her Homo Empire," 18G7 ; "The New Zealaud Handbook" (which went through twelve editions) ; "A Short Synoptical View of the New Zealand of to-day," 1867 ; " Australian Independeuce," 1870'; and some other pamphlets, of which wo have not the names. His services to the Colony have been universally acknowledged, and he haa on several occasions received the most complimentary letters from gentlemen holding high positions in the Colony, for his bfcertiona ,in the work of colonisatiou. i

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Mr. T.Kelly, M.H.R., announces that he, Taranaki Herald, Volume XXIV, Issue 2466, 25 November 1876

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Mr. T.Kelly, M.H.R., announces that he Taranaki Herald, Volume XXIV, Issue 2466, 25 November 1876

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