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TERRIBLE TYPHOON IN CHINA.

AWFUL DESTRUCTION OF LIFE AND PKOPERTY. WHOLE STREETS BLOWN DOWN. FROiM: TEN TO TWENTY THOUSAND PEOPLE KILLED. BURNING OF THE DEAD.

A terrible typhoon occurred in South China between midnight and 4 a.m., of Wednesday, the 23rd September, and is described as the most violent within the memory of living men. It iB estimated that the loss of life in the city of Victoria, in the islands and villages of the immediate neighbourhood and the adjacent waters, amounted to several thousands. Six steamers and twenty-seven European large vessels in the harbour were either sunk, driven on shore, dismasted, or more or less damaged, whilst the destruction of property on shore was wholesale. The roofs of many substantially built residences of the European settlers, were blown off, and there being a heavy rain, the rooms were saturated, and furniture was destroyed. The Catholic church of St. Joseph was demolished, only portions of the end walls being left standing. The Chinese villages in other parts of the island, or across the harbour on the mainland — notwithstanding their sheltered positions— suffered terribly, both in loss of life and damage to property. The full extent of the damage caused by the typhoon which extended far beyond Hongkong, will probably never be known. The loss of life was enormouß. The labour of grave-digging becoming too great, the dead bodies as washed up by the sea, and disentombed from fallen houses, were heaped together and burned ; more than a thousand beiug thus destroyed in one day. At least 10,000 persons perished in the Kwangtung Province only, and some accounts put the number at 100,000. The special correspondent of the Hongkong limes says — "Whole streets are obliterated, the houses either levelled to the ground, or but heaps of rubbish. The loss amongst the shipping was by no means so great at Macao as at Hongkong. At the lame time hundreds of junks, sampans, and small boats have been destroyed, and many of their occupants lost. Only a few yards off the harbour's edge a dozen corpses were to be seen floating in the water, stiff and rigid, with uplifted hands, as though the last human effort had been to clutch at anything which promised succour. It is impossible to give anything like an accurate estimate. No one put the number at less than five thousand, whilst others say it will reach twenty thousand."

The Streets of WANGANUi^says the Wanganui Herald) are gradually being 6anded up by drifting sand. In front of the Institute it has already accumulated to a considerable depth, and complaints are made about it, as it "is most annoying to everybody who has occasion to go through it." Immigration Barracks at Carlyle.— Active preparations are being made for the reception of immigrants at Patea. The immigration barracks are in course of erection, and will be roomy enough. Ithas nearly a hundred feet frontage, by a depth of forty feet in the wings. There will be two rooms, 40 k 20, and six rooms 16* 14, two treble and two double chimnies. Two cottages are also to be built near the barracks, for the accommodation of married couples and their families. The buildings aro to bo erected just above the Courthouse, iv the Taranaki Road. The Gift of Healing and Peophect. — The Otago Daily Times says— "The Key. Mr. Staok, Maori Missionary, Canterbury, preached an eloquent eormoa at St. Paul's Church, Otago, and cuoso his text from the Ist Corinthians, iii., and part of the 7th verse :— Tho manifestation of the Spirit." He stated that supernatural power, suoh as the gifts of healing and propheoy, were granted to all Christians alike for the first two hundred years after the day of Pentecost, when the apostles received tho gift of tongues, &c. He related some of the different circumstances under which the Holy Spirit now worked, specially referring to the wretched John Newton, who, after his conversion, became a miuister of the Gospel, and to whom the Churoh was indebted for some of her sweetest hymns. The rev. gentleman's principal object iv visiting the Province ib to inspeot the Maori BcboolB.".

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TH18741125.2.13

Bibliographic details

TERRIBLE TYPHOON IN CHINA., Taranaki Herald, Volume XXII, Issue 2257, 25 November 1874

Word Count
689

TERRIBLE TYPHOON IN CHINA. Taranaki Herald, Volume XXII, Issue 2257, 25 November 1874

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