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MONTHLY SUMMARY.

The General Assembly was opened by commission on Monday last, when the mere formal business of electing the Speaker and swearing in the members of the House was gone through. In the Legislative Council, the members of which are nominated by the Governor for life, several of the honorable gentlemen objected to be resworn. Wo are not aware if any extraordinary scene occurred on the occasion, but presume the difficulty was got over by allowing the honorable members to take the oath "under protest." Mr, Dillon Bell has been elected Speaker of the House of Representatives in the room of Sir DaWi Monro, and Mr. G. M. O'Rorke is mentioned as the future Chairman of Committees, an office held for many years by Mr. Carleton, who failed during the late •elections to obtain a seat in the House. Both Mr. Bell and Mr. O'Rorke have had considerable parliamentary experience^ the latter being Speaker to the Auckland Provincial Council. On Tuesday last, his Excellency met the Parliament, and ■delivered his usual opening address. If any one expects to gather from the Governor's speech an idea of what course the Ministry in powerintead toparsueduringthe present session, they will be grievously disappointed. It is a mere collection of stereotyped phrases strung together. His Excellency states he has much " satisfaction" in having to -call the members together for their assistance and advice. He then announces thait the Ballot Bill has worked satisfactorily ; tbat he has visited the Middle Island and West Coast, and observes witli another " satisfaction" the growing prosperity of the Northern Island. He •congratulates the Houses on the improved arrangements made for the postal service to England vid San 'Francisco, and hopes the Australian 'Colonies will cooperate, and that the United States will support the line. He briefly ■mentions' tbe death of Tamati Waka ; the -successful negotiation of the loan, and has great "" satisfaction" again in observing 'that the native tribes in the interior of the Island are anxiousto have roads made throngn their lands. Of course the •estimates " are to be framed with strict regard to economy ;" but his Excellency lias to regret to inform tbe House that "there lias been a considerable falling off in the revenue during the past year. Having concluded the congratulatory part •of Ms speech, the Governor proceeds to state that an Education Bill will be sent •down, also Bills to amend the laws relating "to the Native Land Courts ; to bankruptcy ; ~for regulation of charitable trusts ; and for the gold-fields; Bills to confer •certain powers on committees in disputed ■elections, and also on Highway Boards ; ibr the regulation of coasting vessels, the •encouragement of fisheries, and for the appointment of a public trustee for pro•enring land for settlement of emigrants. Having announced this much, his Excellency concluded by trusting that their •deliberations will contribute .to the **' unity, peace, and prosperity of the | 'Colony." There is very little subject matter in the speech for comment, -consequently the debate on the " reply" ■will assuredly be a lame affair, unless the 'Opposition members introduce some new "element into the discussion, and draw from the "Government an exposition of its future intentions. We, however, hardly think this 5s likely to tale place, for the Opposition ■party is not so strong that it can afford to •show its hand so early in the session. We •doubt much if the real business will commence before the arrival of the Honorable Mr. Yogel in Wellingtoa. — Taranalci ■■H&i-ald, August 19.

The Postkl Service. — Easy commtraicaiaon *by means of the Post, has become so necessary tTiait it woald be difficult to imagine •a State of things in which this agency of ■civilized life cfid not exist. The post had sts origin in political necessity, and -was •originally established by the Roman •emperors Tor the safe, regular, and speedy •transmission of pnbfic despatches to remote parts of their dominions. Louis XI was tthe first to introduce the system into ■modern Europe, and it was not long before •private individuals availed themselves of "the means for -conveying their letters to •correspondents. In almost all countries Sn the world, "the post-office service is 'conducted by agents of tbe Government, ;and it is one of the few industrial undertakings which appear tobebetter managed "by them iihan ■could be by private individuals. We have before us the •twelfth report of the postal service of New Zealand, and it may be interesting: to our Teaders to laaow what the Postmaster- i •General bas to say to bis Excellency with respect to the work done in bis department during the past year. During the year 1870 and the first half of the year 1871, we are informed that important •changes have taken place in the Postal Department of New Zealand. New ■contracts have been formed For the conveyance of our English mails via San Francisco, and corresponding changes also made for distributiag the mails when Teceived. Redactions have been made on the postage of inter-colonial letters, of the registration fee, and of the fee for late letters; also on the postage of interprovincial letters. The growing wants of the country have been met by the opening of fifty-four new offices, but eleven have been closed ; thirteen new post offices have been erected, of which two were in this Province, namely, at Patea and Opunake. Several of the overland mail services have been extended and new ones established, and mention is made of a twice a week service between Wellington and New Plymouth being now performed by coach.

During last year 2,626,947 letters passed ! through the post office, being 252,887 more than in 18G9 ; 3,018,932 letters were received, being 376,397 over the number of the previous year. The newspapers show a considerable increase— l,622,72B were despatched, being 136,473 over that of ] 869, and 2,266.934 received, which shows an increase of 190,042. There are five hundred and fifty-five officers connecter] with the Postal Department, and four hundred and fifty-seven post offices. The Postmaster-General announces with satisfaction tbat the number of dead letters are year by year decreasing ; iv 1867 there were 37,628, whereas last year the number was only 27,227. Registered letters have increased during 1870, as alsojhas the business in the money order department. The total amount of money orders issued during 1870 was £140,454 7s. lid. against £127,218 4s. lid. in 1869 ; and the total amount of payments in 1870 was £84,823 19s. 6d. against £75,833 18s. 4d. in the year previous. Telegraph money orders is a system which has been introduced and proved eminently successful ; in six months the sum of £4,216 Is. 6d. was transmitted in this way, the commission paid thereon amounting to £156 Bs. 6d. The Post Office Savings Bank shows a steady and increasing business during the last year. The amount of deposits was £264,328 ss. 7d. asagainst£24o,B9Bss.9d. in 1869 ; and 4,304 new accounts opened as against 3,839 the previous year. The amount remaining in deposit at the close of 1870 was £55,801 18s. Since the Savings Bank was first opened in 1867, £796,134 10s. Bd. have been deposited ; to which has been added interest to the amount of £20,275 13s. 3d., making the total £816,410 3s. lid. Compared with the population of the Colony, the number of new depositors was 1 in 59 ; and the average amount at the credit of each account open on the 31st December, 1870, was £35 19s. The remainder of the report is but a recapitulation of the terms agreed to for the new mail service with America. The amount to be paid for it is £50,000 per annum, but during the time the contractors do not run their boats to Australia, the subsidy to be paid is at the rate of £40,000 per annum. Contracts have been also entered iuto for a service between Manukau and Picton, calling at New Plymouth and Nelson, at the rate of £300 a month ; and between Nelson and Hokitika for £650 a year. The revenue when compared with last year, we regret to see has slightly decreased, and which is attributed to the reduction on the inter-colonial and inter-provincial rate of postage. The saving, howevei', to the pnblic in postage must have been something considerable, and as the correspondence is sure to increase in proportion to the reduction in the rates, it is but reasonable to suppose that the diminution of the postal revenue will be only temporary. The PostmasterGeneral's report is not long, but it conveys a very clear idea of what the Government has done during the past year in this branch of the public service.

Roads in Taranaki. — The making of roads through the territory inhabited by natives, so that the light of civilisation and progress may be admitted into the darkened wastes of the country, has been long 1 advocated ; but it has remained for the present Government to bring the theory into actual practice. The task has been one of difficulty, and if so much has not been done as could have been wished, still it must be owned that a large amount of work has been accomplished in all parts of the country ; much of which was formerly occupied by rebellious tribes of natives. From amougst the batch of papers laid on the table of the House of Representatives by order of his Excellency (copies of which reached us by the last mail), we have full particulars relative to the construction of roads through native districts in the North Island. We find that a road has been marie from Tauranga to Lake Taupo (a distance of one hundi'ed miles), opening up a splendid country; and a coast road by way of Opotiki and Torere, in the Bay of Plenty, is rapidly advancing towards completion. From Napier to Foxton, throngh the Manawatu Gorge and Seventy Mile Bush, the road has been vigorously pushed on ; and v much labour has been expended on other lines in different parts of this island. Within our own Province much also has been accomplished, as we gather from Mr. O. Carrington's report to the Under Secretary of the Public Works Department. We find that a sum of £96 7s. has been expended in the district north of the Waitara in the forming of roads between the camp at Waiiti and Urenui, and from thence inland to Tikorangi. The work has been completed in a satisfactory manner by the Constabulary, Bushrangers and natives. Turning to the south of the town, Mr. O. Carrington states that as far as Stoney River (a distance of seventeen miles) the line of road is already laid out, and four miles of ifc metalled. From here to Waiweranui, the work of clearing, cutting, ditching, and fixing culverts is being done by natives, and extends a distance of four and a half miles. The line of road passes through a level fern district, containing soveral swamps. Between Waiweranui and Utnuroa (a distance of about twenty-three miles) the land is owned by the Pariaka Natives, and as permission to make a road through it has not yet been obtained, no examination of its character has been made. Several contracts have been entered into with the natives to form the line from Umuroa to Taungatara, •which passes the flax works at Opunake, but owing to the unfavourable state of the weather the work has not progressed very expeditiously .

From Taungatara to Rawa (about eight miles), the road work has been undertaken by Honi Pihama and Ngahinc. The principal portion of this line passes through open fern and flax land ; the ground though undulating, has soveral swamps on it, which will roquiro a considerable amount of draining before a good road can be made. Twelve miles beyond this, as far as Waingongoro, contracts have been let to natives, who have still a quantity of clearing, cutting, ditching, and earthwork to do. Crossing the Waingongoro River, we enter the Patea District. Hero three bridges are iv the course of erection at a cost of £1,310 • besides approaches to to be made, some roads to be formed, and several box culverts to be fixed. The total expenditure for which contracts have beon entered into in this Provinco up to the 30th June last, amounts to £7,054 145. lOd. Mr. O. Carrington speaks of the difficulties he has had to contend with in carrying out the works in this district, which we can readily believe, as the natives will tak© their own time to complete any work they may undertake. He further states that there are fourteen rivers which require bridging, all of which are formidable during the wet season, and are .affected simultaneously by freshets. To do this would require an expenditure of about £-£,000. Mr. Carrington adds — "To complete the line of road, excluding the estimated amount previously mentioned for the erection of the fourteen bridges, I consider that it will inquire an outlay of about £140 per mile, exclusive of the amount already expended (which would give an average of £200 a mile) to complete the road between Uniuroa and Waingougoro, independently of the cost of metalling ; this would add very considerably to the cost, probabl y not less than £300 a mile." Besides the above, fin inland road towards Mount Egmont has been cut, through six miles of which the bush has been felled a chain wide, a track of thirty feet cleared, and a bridge has been constructed over the Mangamahoe. The total cost of this work is stated to be £339 12s. Bd. Tho weather during the winter months has been so severe that it has not only prevented- the works being proceeded with, but likewise has undone much that had been accomplished ; however, with the spring and fine weather, the works will be recommenced with vigour, and a good road will be made through the beautiful and fertile district, to the south, which cannot fail to be of the utmost advantage to this Province.

Trip op the 'Luna' to Kawhia. — The Government steamer ' Luna' looked in at Raglan about 2 p.m.' on the 6th August, en route from Wellington to the Manukau, and left again the same night. She had been into Kawhia and a mile or two up the harbour the same morning, much to tbe astonishment of the Kiugites, and to the satisfaction of the peaceably-dis-posed amongst them. Hone Te One has recently visifced Kawhia to see a sick relative, and Tawhiao, beins: there at the time, sent for him. The King said that his party had called a meeting for the beginning of August at Te Kuiti, at which he wished the friendly chiefs and the " pakeha rangatiras" to be present. He had sent notices to his people, and he wished Hone to communicate on the subject with his party. The subjects for discussion were peace, the Taupo road, ■and the Te Aroha claim. He said tho Europeans had got a road within ten miles of Hangatiki, and it must come to peace or war soon. Tawhiao offered Hone possession of Kawhia, but Hone declined to accept until peace was made. Reihana to Whakahoehoe is said to be the moving spirit in this meeting.

Murder op a Native at Ohinemuri. — The Thames Star says :—": — " Mr Louis Dihars, who arrived from Ohinemuri on the 21st August, informed us that tho opinion amongst those who should know best is that tho native woman, who it was rumoured had been murdered, inflicted the wounds upon hei-solf. The injuries were not, he says, at all like those which would be inflicted with a tomahawk by another person, but were such as might, and most probably were, received from her own hand. Sub-Tnspector Bullen and Mr. Puckey, Native Commissioner, proceeded to Ohinemuri, where they fully investigated the circumstances attending the death of the woman Matona. The evidence adduced points to the committal of a murder, but it is impossible to fix the crime upon anyone. The affair is at present enveloped in doubt. The Hauhau party (who obstructed the investigation by native assessors), aided Mr. Puckey."

TgKooti Threatens to Attack Whakatane. — Authentic intelligence was received at Tanranga on Friday, 4th August, that Te Kooti, with a number of armed followers, was actually in the 'neighbourhood of Whakatane, and proposed making an attack on that place. He was said to have been joined by some twenty men of the Ngatikahungunn, a Napier tribe, and also by several of the Uriwera. The garrison in the redoubt at Whakatane consisted of six of the Armed Constabulary, who wore kept constantly on guard with double sentries. A reinforcement of five men, under Captain G undry, were sent from Taui'anga on the sth, and five were sent from Opotiki. In addition to this defensive force, there are a number of loyal natives, composed of the Ngatipukeko and Ngatiawa, but these could not be relied ou for guards so well as Europeans.

Earthquake. — A slight shock of earthquake was fi'lt on tho 29th August, between two and thveo a.m.

DisßANinruNT of the Taranaki Mounted Volunteers. — The Gi'.zette notifies that tho Governor has been pleased ct to discontinue the services" of the above corps at their own request.

THE MASONIC BALL. We avail ourselves of tho first opportunity of publishing a more detailed account of the ball given by tho Mount Egmont, Do Burgh Adams, and Southern Killwiuning lodges of Freemasons, which oamo off on Tuesday evening, the 7th August. The stewards on this occasion were — Brothers J. Ellis, P.M., J. H. Holford, A. Weyergang, P. J. O'Carroll, and A. S. Douglas, Brother G. D. Ilaminerton acting as M.C. The aftair, as might have been expected from the names of the stewards, was a great success, and tbo room was decorated with great tasto. 'At about eight o'clock the oompauy began to arrive, aud from that hour until eleven fresh guests added to tho nnmbor, until the assembly presented a most brilliant appearance. The ball commeuced with a qaadrillo, formed solely by brothers of the craft and their partners (the guests sitting down meanwhile), and was opened by Brother \V. Ciirrington, P.M., and Miss Carrington. After this thoro was an almost unanimous rise on tho part of the company, and dancing was kept up with much spirit uutil midnight, when supper was announced. The supper, which was spread iv tho side room, was provided by Mr. B. 0. Lawrence, and was really a triumph in tho culinary art. The most fastidious epicure conld not fail to find somothing to his taste amongst the numerous dishes displayed. Tho company returned to tho ball-room, where dancing was kept np until an early hour in the morning. We should not forget to mention that the music furnished on this occasion was that of the A.C. Baud, and composed some of the besc dancing airs in tho musical repertoire. The following is a list of those that were present on this occasion :—: — Masons.— Past Masters: W. Carrington, J. Ellis, and G. D. Hammerton. Brothers; P. J. O'Carroll, A. Weyergang, F. L. Webster, R. Hughes, N. Golding, E. Bayley, J. H. Holford, A. Harley, F. Rolfe, A. S. Douglas, J. Van, W. Hancock, G. Thomas, S. W. Jackson, J. W. Sheppee, W. H. Pitcairn, D. Callaghan, W. R. Townsend, Sheehy, W. Cottier, T. Harrison, and Dr. G. St. George. Guests. — 'His Honor the Superintendent, Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Hammerton, Mr. C. D. Whitcombe, Mr. W. J. Parris and Miss Parris, Miss ltiemenschneider, Major Tuke, Mr. and Mrs. Kenny, Major and Miss Stapp, Mr. and Misses Mace, Mr. T. Maco, Mr. J. Mace, Mr. and Mrs. W. Wright, Mr. W. C. Chilman and Miss Chiltnan, Mrs. and Miss Medland and Mr. R. H. Medland, Mr. J. Reynolds and Miss Reynolds, Mr. JT. Carrington and Miss Carrington, Mr. F. Gledhill, Mr. R. J. Collins, Mr. G. N. Curtis, Mr. H. Curtis, Mrs. Webber, Mr. and Mrs. H. Brown and Miss C. Brown, Mr. C. F. Crawford, Mr. H. Weston, Mr. R. Harrison and Miss Harrison, Mr. R. A. Buchanan, Mr. W. Whitoombe, Mr. C. Gray, Mr. F. Newshara, Mrs. and Misses Newsham, Mr. R. G. Hughes, Mrs. aud Miss Hughes, Mr. C. Rowe and Miss Rowe, Mr. W. H. J. Seffern, Mr. and Mrs. Gilmour and Miss Gilmour, Mrs. and Miss Ella Smith and Mr. F. S. Smith, Mr. F. Samuel, MrJßoyce, Mr. I. Johnson, Mr. W. Foote, Mrs. Middleton, Mr. G. D. Draper, Mr. O. Oxenham, Captain Crapp, Mrs. T. Kelly and Miss Walker, Mrs. Hammertou, Mrs. Manners and Miss Carrington, Mrs. H. Shuttleworth and Miss Shuttleworth, Mrs. W. Seccombe, Miss Lowe, Mrs. T. King and Miss King, Miss Oliver, Mrs. Douglas and Miss Shaw, Mrs. F. L. Wobster, Mrs. Brind aud Miss Newland, Miss Harris, Mrs. O'Carroll, the Misses Humphries (3), Miss Morshead, the Misses George, Miss Brooking, Mrs. Oudd and Miss E. Hoskin, Mrs. and Miss Golding, Mrs. C. W. nursthouse, Mrs. aud Miss Hempton, Mrs. and Miss Stockley, Miss B. Callaghan, Mr. T. Bland. Depaktukb of the Members of the General Assembly. — His Honor the Superintendent, T. Kelly, Esq., and H. Scotland, Esq., took their departure for Wellington in the p. 8. ' Luna,' on 10th August. Lectures. — A course of lectures are to be given in the Institute, to be commenced on the 12th September, by the Rev. J. Crump. The proceeds aro to be devoted to the repairs of the Wesleyan school-room. Mii.itia Promotion. — In the New Zealand Gazette of 10th August, wo notice the following promotion :—": — " Assistant Surgeon Patrick Joseph O'Carroll, L.R.C.5.1., to be Surgeon. Date of commission, 'Ith May, 1871." Home and Foreign Missions. — Two sermons were preached iv the Primitive Methodist Chapel on 27th August, in aid of tho home and foreign missions. In the morning the Rev. J. Crump preachod, and in the eveuiug the Rev. J. Dnmbell. On the following evening a public meeting was held in the chapel, when addresses wero delivered, having reference to the above objoot. Sudden Death. — Another very sudden death has occurred. Mrs. Ryan, we understand, retrod to rpufc on _17bh_ August in apparently good health, but about five a.m. on the 18th August, her daughter, who slept in the same room, hearing her mother breathing hard, rose and lighted a candle,- when she found her just dying. She immediately sent her brother for Dr. St. George, who on his arrival pronounced Mrs. Ryan dead. The Bridges in the Patea Distbict. — Mr. O. Carrington, in charge of the road work on tho West Coast, arrived in towu from Patea on the 25th August. We understand that the bridges over the Manawapou and Tangahoe are completed, and the one over the Waingongoro will soon be finished. These bridges will not be available For coach traffic for a short time yet, as the side cuttings cannon be completed "until tho fino weather sets in. Before the summer, this part of the road will be fit for travelling with some degree of comfort. Thf Late Heavy Rains. — The rain that fell on Friday and Saturday last caused the rivers to rise considerably higher than has been known for years past. The water of the Waiwakaiho was, at 7 a.m. on Saturday morning, within two feet of tho top cylinder of the bridge, and that of the Huatoki within a foot or so of the arch. During Monday last a part of the dam at the Pioneer Steel Works gave way, causing the Mangatuku to rise in town several feet. The floor of Mr. S. Oliver's mill was covered with two or three feet of water, and Mr. Davidson's shoeing yard was flooded. A bridge near Tataraimaka, wo hear, was washed away on Saturday, but with these exceptions no other damage was done. — Taranaki Herald, August IG. Winter Evenings Entertainment. — An instance of the popularity of these entertainments was given by the large and appreciative audience which assembled at tho Institute on the 14th August. Tho band of the Armed Constabulary, under the direction of Mr. Townsend, lent their aid, and considerably added to the success of the entertainment. The programo was as follows :—: — , '■ Die Wacht am Rhcim," Band; Reading, "A New Zealand Snow Storm," Archdeacon Govett ; Piano duett, by two ladies 5 Reading, "The Hand of Glory," Mr. Whitcombe ; " Hilda" Waltz, Band ; Reading, Seleotion from " Eothen," Mr. E. E. Kenny ; Song, Mr. Joynt ; Scene from " Hunchback," Mr. Seffern ; " Eclipse" Polka, 3and ; Selection, " Shamus O'Brien," Mr. Joynt ; Reading, " Mrs. Candle's washing day," Mr. Whitcombe ; God save the Queen ! The Native Population of the Northern Island of New Zealand is estimated at 32,301. Sugar at Patea is now one shilling per pound, and is expected (says the Wanganui Ilerald) that ?n another week, unless a supply can be sent in ;he meantime, to be one shilling and sixpence. The Census or New Zealand. — The most lotioeable part of the census yet published is the remarkable increase in the female population that has taken place in the Colony between 1867 aud 1871. Females have increased to the extent of 22.45 per cent, while tho male population has only increased 13 85 per cent.

OPUNAKE FLAX COMPANY, (Limited). The third half-yearly general meeting of shareholders was held on 14th August, at the office of tho Company, Brooking's buildings. Mr. Xorthcroft occupied the chair. The Secretary (Mr. Cholwill) read the report as follows :— Third half-yearly Report of five Directors of the Opunake Flax Company, (Limited), to Hid General Meeting of ShareJwlders held on August 14, 1871. In tho second half-yearly report proaeHted to the shareholders on the 30th January, 1871, the nocessity for increased production was prominently brought forward, and it ws»s proposed to erect another mill at Heimama. This proposition did not meet with the full approbation of the shareholders, the directors have therefore given a good deal of attention to the subject, so as to increase the production with as small an outlay as possible, yet keeping in view the absolute necessity for increased production to make it profitable They have therefore written to Mr. Chilman to proenre a turbine of the best construct-on, by which they hope to secure the greatest amount of power the present stream supplemented by an increased fall will supply. Tenders have been received for the construction of a substantial dam in masonry, by which they hope to secure the whole of the water when at its lowest dnring summer. The head race will require some alteration by raising the bed and altering its form to secure the full effect of the stream when low, and these alterations, as well as the construction of the dam, will be proceeded with as soon as possible. The new dam will be from three to four feet higher thar, the present one, and by lowering the tail race a foot or two, twenty-five or twenty-six feet fall will be obtained giving from fifteen to twenty horse-power — a power the directors hope to obtain at the present site, except at an unusually dry time. This power would drive four machines and the scutchers, or six machines without the scutchers. The manager is of opinion that by working four machines, flax can be produced at £12 per ton. At our last meeting it appeared that the cost of producing a ton of flax was £24, but this has been gradually rednced, so that with two machines working it has been s produced at £15 per ton, and the cost of the fifty-five tons produced (including rent aud management) has not exceeded £20 4s. per ton, distributed as follows :—l4: — 14 tons per ' Melita,' to London ;15 tons per 'England,' to London j 3 tons per steamer, to Molbonrno ; 23 tons in store at Opunake. The store has yielded a net profit of £83, gross £107 (the store having been charged with Mr. Black's salary during January and February) aud shows that during the last half-year it has paid the cost of management ; it will also be seen on reference to the last report, that the debts due to the store have been reduced about £70. William Noetucrobt, Chairman. Statement of Receipts and Disbursements of the . Opunake Flam Company {Limited) , for tJie lialfyear ending 3Oi7i June, 187 1. Dr. £ s. d. To balance Bank of New Zealand Ist January, 1871. 16 4 11 „ cash from calls 876 10 0 „ sale of plant 3 18 3 „ interest 11 6 0 „ two bills drawn against shipments 480 0 0 „ sale of flax 48 15 0 „ sale at store 783 0 9 £2,219 14 11 Cr. £ s. d. By g ods for store ... ... ... 551 8 5 „ plant 546 16 5 „ charges 810 4 3 „ Manager'sand Secretary's salary 97 18 8 „ freight to Melbourne 12 12 10 „ freight, insurance, &c, of shipments to England per ' Melita' and « England' 180 14 4 „ balance Bank of New Zealand... 20 0 0 £2,219 14 11 Balance Sheet of the Opunake Flax Company, (Limited.) Dr. £ s. d. To 562 shares at £7 per share, paid up 3,934 0 0 „ less, arrears of calls 114 0 0 3,820 0 0 „ Now Zealand .Loan and Mercantile Agency Company ... ... 480 0 0 £4,300 0 0 Cr. £ a. d. By plant 2,300 8 8 „ stock in store 217 12 2 „ debts due to storo ... ... 107 18 8 „ debts duo to flax 12 12 10 ■„ expenses on shipments... ... 180 14 4 „ flax account 1,032 10 8 „ profit and loss 428 2 8 „ balance Bank of New Zealand... 20 0 0 £4,300 0 0 Profit and Loss Account. Dr. £ s. d. To balance 522 8 11 £522 8 11 Cr. £ s. d. By interest account 116 0 „ store 83 0 3 „ balance 428 2 8 £522 8 11 The Cv AIRMAN then moved the adoption of the report, which was seconded by Mr. Weyekgang. Mr. F. L. Webster inquired if all the arrears of calls had been paid up since the end of June. Tho Secretary replied that all the shares had been paid up, with the exception of Mr. Sohofield's, who was absent from the Province. Mr. Kingdon asked if the store was a paying concern. The Chairman replied that the net profit was £83, and the gross profit £107. During the halfyear £70 of the debts duo had been collected. Mr. Weyergang said that as the shareholders might not be aware of what the debt due to the store consisted of, 118 might mention that it was owed by the natives from whom the Company leased the land, and could be collected at any time. Mr. Hursthouse inquired what the parties in Melbourne, to whom flax had beon sent, thonght of it. t Q'he Chairman said that one bale had been disposed of at £24, and the remaining two at £20. That was a higher price than any had fetched in that market. Mr. King said he might inform the shareholders that a letter had been received from Wellington, to say tbat the flax sent home would be charged less freight on account of its being so well packed. Mr. Wryergang said that whilst in Nelson he had met Colonel Harrington,^ho took an interest in everything concerning flax manufacture, and he had told him (Mr. W.) that there were more natural facilities for dressing flax at Opunako than at any other part of New Zealand he had visited. After a few further remarks the report was adopted, and the meeting separated.

SUDDEN DEATH OF MRS. RYAN. An inquest upon the body of Mrs. Jersey Ryan, was held in the Court House, on 19oh August, before Josiah Flight, Esq., Coroner. The jury having viewed the body, Michael Kelly, deposed : lam son-in-law of the deceased. I last saw her alive between five and six o'clock on Thursday evening last. I and my family were having tea with her. She appeared to mo the same as she has done for the last eleven years. I know she had been troubled in her mind on account of her hnsband leaving her. About eighteen months ago when the deceased was living at Dr. Rawson's, sho had a violent bleeding from the nose, an,d Dr. O'Carroll who attended her said that it probably saved her life. — Jane Ryan, deposed : I Inst saw my mother alive on Friday morning about five o'clock. I was sleeping iv the same bed with, her. Sho did not speak. She was dead about five minutes after I awoke. I sent my brother for the doctor. The faoe of the deceased was drawn on one side when I awoke and saw her. My mother appeared to be quite well when sho retired to rest. — Charles Revoll, deposed : lam a shoemaker, and my workshop is next to the Ryan's house. Yesterday morning about six o'clock, Miss Ryan came to 'my door, aud said she thonght her mother was dying, and asked my wife to go over with her. My wife being unwell, I went over to get Mrs. Dover, but as I could get no answer I went over to Mrs. Ryan's myself. I went upstairs and saw Mrs. Ryan. I saw no indications of life in the body. I noticed that the mouth of the deceased was open, but as it was hardly daylight, I did not perceive anything more. — Dr. St. George, deposed : On Friday morning about 6 o'clock, I was called to see Mrs. Ryan, and I found her quite dead. The muscles of the face were drawn on one side. They are not so now. She had then all the appearance of a person having died from a fit of apoplexy. I made a post-mortem examination of the body this morning. I found the brain very much surcharged with blood, so that the deceased must have died almost immediately after being seized by the fit of apoplexy. The right lobe of the lungs was slightly congested, but in all other respectß the body appeared to be very healthy. My opinion is that apoplexy was the cause of death. Hospital Sergeant Hill assisted me iv making the post mortem examination. A blood vessel at the back of the brain had burst, and that caused the lump to which one of the jurymen refers. The Coroner having made a few observations, the jury returned a verdiot of " death from natural causes." The Weather During the Month of July.— The following is an abstract of the meteorological observations taken in New Plymouth daring the month of July, 1871 : — Barometer — Mean for the month, 29*73 inches ; maximum, (on the 23rd), 30- 386 inches; minimum, (on the 10th), 29,302 inches. Temperature in the shade — Approximate mean temperature for the "month, 50*6 fahrenheit ; maximum temperature^ on 2nd, 66*0 ; minimum on 12th, 320. fiain^Mßpt'al rain fall, 9*63 inches ; rain fell on twenty-nine days ; maximum rainfall in twenty-four honrs, (on tho 26th), 1*46 inches. Wind— Average daily velocity for month, 311*0 miles; maximum, (on-the 10th), 545*0 miles. Mean amount of cloud (0 clear sky, 10 overcast), 6*9. The English Telegrams via Opunake.— The ' Nevada' with the English mail via San Francisco, arrrived in Auckland harbour, at 3.30 p.m. on the 16th. A brief summary of news was made up by Greville's agent iv Auckland, and forwarded by a schooner vid Tauranga, which reached there about noon on the 18th. Another aud fuller summary was sent by the s.s. ' Tarannki,' whioh left Onebnnga on the 17th. The steamer, however, was bar-bonnd at the Manukau a day, delaying her arrival here nntil the morning of the 19th, at about 7 a.m. The despatch containing the telegrams was forwarded ashore, and a messenger (Mr. Russell) who was in readiness, at once left for Opunake, arriving there at a few minutes after 12 noon. Mr. Russell finding the telegraphist had gone to Te Namu to dinner, had to return to that place, (a distance of nearly a mile), and on delivering his message Mr. Shalders at once went to the office and forwarded the telegrams to Wellington. The distance between New Plymouth and Opunake is about fifty miles, therefore the journey being done in five hours was good riding ; especially as it was d t one on one horse. Had the steamer not been delayed at the Manukau, there can be no doubt but that the telegrams would have reached Opunake before the schooner did Taoranga. — Taranaki Herald, August 3. Hon. Mr. Farmer. — The Independent learns from a reliable source that this gentleman has realised out of his mining interests at the Thames, £1/0,000. Calls to the Legislative Council. — Hia Excellency the Governor has summoned Do Renzie James Brett, Esq., of Christchnrch, in the Province of Canterbury ; George Buckley, Esq., of Waikakahi, in the Province of Canterbury j James Farmer, Esq., of Auckland, in the Province of Auckland ; and William Barnard Rhodes, Esq., of Wellington, in the Province of Wellington ; to the Legislative Council of New Zealand. Patea in a State of Starvation. — A correspondent writing from Patea, says — •* We are nearly all starving here. We have had a gale blowing for about a month or six weeks, consequently no vessels have been able. to come here, and, as a natural consequence, the storekeepers are out of flour, tea, sngar, currants, tobacco, &c, and the publicans out of beer and grog. The dray road to Patea from Wangauui is all but impassable, therefore, I may say, starvation and sobriety stare us in the face. Not even the narcotic influence of tobacco is allowed us. Oh, for an ounce of bird's eye, or a glass of P. 8 .! How long this weather will last, I have no idea."

Death of Tamati Waka. — From onr Auckland files we learn that the old Bay of Islands chief, Tamati Waka, is dead. He was the staunch friend of the " white man" dnring the early days of the settlement of the Bay of Islands, and his servioes are faithfully recorded in Judge Manning's history of the " War in the North :"— " After Kawiti and Heke had burned Kororarekain 1845, Tamati Waka gathered his friends to the number of 500, and went to the assistance of his European friends, and fonghtfor them throughout the wholo of Heko's war. His age can only be guessed at, bnt it is asserted that he could not be less than 80 or 90 years of age, as he was a chief of influence 30 years ago." The old warrior was nearly bent double with age, and we understand that it was difficult to recognise in the shrivelled old man the active and powerful chief he is said to have been.

A Sea-Dog has been recently captured in tho Manukau harbour, and was exhibited in Auckland. A large nnmber of people visited ifc, who all expressed much surprise at such an animal having been captured in these waters. Many different opinions were hazarded as to the exact; genus of the animal, which is different from a seal, inasmuch as it has two hiud legs, webbfooted, upon whioh it can stand, and no doubt walk if ifc had space. Ifc is kept in a largo box with an iron grating above, and is occasionally " refreshed" with a bucket of salt water poured upon it, and which appears to afford ifc infinite delight. — Southern Cross. Casting of the Fire Bell at Wellington. — An official trial of the sonndness and other qualities of the bell has been made (says tho Independent) by the judges appointed by the brigades to teßt its efficiency. The bell being bronght outsido the foundry, a shears was erected, and the bell hoisted clear. Its tone was tested, and was very satisfactory to the judges. Beyond some trifling alterations, the bell is now fit to be handed over to the brigades. As confirmation of the powerful tone of the bell, the sound of the strokes was distinctly heard some distance towards Karori.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TH18710902.2.25

Bibliographic details

Taranaki Herald, Taranaki Herald, Volume XIX, Issue 1120, 2 September 1871

Word Count
6,614

MONTHLY SUMMARY. Taranaki Herald, Volume XIX, Issue 1120, 2 September 1871

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