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SPORTING INTELLIGENCE.

THE DERBY AND THE OAKS. Baron Rothschild this year has the rare good fortune of carrying ofl' the two Erst prizes in the great races ; the Derby and the Oaks. The former waa won by Favonius, and the latter by Hannah. It is noticeable that Zpphyr, the dam of Favonius, the Derby winner, is Bister to Hannah, the winner of the Oaks, tooth Zephyr and Hannah being from the same dam, by the same sire, foaled in different years. Hannah, also, it will be remembered, this year carried off the Newmarket One Thousand Guineas Stakes. Baron Bothschild was so enthusiastically surrounded and cheered on winning the Derby that the assistance of six policemen was necessary to rescue him from the mob of admirers. It is said that Baron Eothschild has given the sum of £1,000 to French, the jockey who rode Favonius, and that he has also bestowed upon him an annuity of £200 for life. The Derby Stakes of 50 soys. h. ft., for then three-year-olda. Colts, 8 st. 10 lb.; fillies, 8 st. 6 lbs. The last mile and a-half on the New Course, 209 subs. Favonius ... ... ... ... 1 King of the Forest 2 Albert Victor 3 Seventeen ran. There were half a dozen false starts before the flag fell, and Digby Grand and Columbus were first off, but in a few strides The Pearl drew ahead and led for nearly a quarter of a mile, giving way then to Digby Grand, to whom succeeded Ripponden, Hyperion, Columbus, and Albert Victor. Columbus soon dropped into the rear, and Digby Grand, The Pearl, and Rippendon, formed the three leaders into the straight, where The Pearl, was in trouble. Favonius and King of the Forest drew up, Digby Grand holding a clear lead in the line for home, with Ripponden second. The latter gave way to King of the Forest and Favonius below distance, and at half-distance Digby Grand retired, and Favonius came out, going in and winning in a canter by a length and a half, King of the Forest running a dead heat for second place with Albert Victor, who came out at the stand. Digby Grand was fourth — a neck from the dead-heatera — Ravenshoe being fifth. Bothwell, sixth, Ripponden seventh, Mr. Feeder eighth, The Count ninth, Grand Coup tenth, Hyperion eleventh, The Pearl and Noblesse next, and Columbus and Eneide last. Time, by Benson's chronograph, 2 mm. 50 sec. Betting at the Post.— 2 to 1 agst Bothwell, 4 to 1 agst Albert Victor, 8 to 1 agst Pearl, 10 to 1 agst Favonius, 100 to 8 agst King of the Forest, 100 to 7 agst Grand Coup, 28 to 1 each agst Noblesse and Rnvenshoe, 30 to 1 agst Digby Grand, 33 to 1 agst The Count, 50 to 1 agst Ripponden, 1,000 to 12 agst Field Marshal, 1,000 to 10 agst Mr. Feeder, 1,000 to 8 agst Hyperion, 1,000 to 4 agst Blen'ieitn, 1,000 to 3 Eneide. The Oaks Stakes of 50 soys,, each, h. ft. for three-year-old allies. Bst. 101 b. each. The last mile and a half on the New Course. — 176 subs. Hannah ... ... ... ... 1 Noblesse ... ... ... ... 2 Hopbine ... ... ... ... 3 Nine ran. They were started at the first attempt, and Belle of Holywell soon made play with a long lead, which she held to the mile post, giving way then to Corisande, who was followed by Headingley, Belle of Holywell, Hannah, and Noblesse. Descending Tattenham-hill Belle of Holywell drew ahead, but a quarter of a mile from home she was beateu, aud Hannah, attended by Noblesse, Corisande, and Hopbine, drew away, and won in a canter by three lengths ; three-quarters of a length between second and third ; Corisande fourth; Bello of Holywell fifth, Steppe sixth, Headingly seventh, The Pearl eighth. Lady Atholstone did not pass the post. Time, by Benson's chronograph, 2 minutes 51 seconds. Baron Rothschild declared to win with Hannah. Betting : 6to 5 agst Hannah, 100 to 30 agsfc Belle of Holywell, 10 to 1 each agat Corisande, Headingley, and The Pearl, 100 to 6 agst Noblesse, 20 to 1 agst Steppe.

Teetotal Periodicals. — The American National Temperance Advocate says that there are thirty newspapers and periodicals in the States devoted to the cause of temperance, not one of which is a source of proQt to its publishers. Mr. Gumouk's Store at Eaglan Bobbed. — A correspondent writes from Raglan to the Southern Cross : — " A robbery was committed here last week at the store of Mr. Gilmour, the oredit of the theft being given to the Hauhaus. It appears that Mrs. Gilmour, at 8 p.m. on Monday evening, left the store door unlocked, expecting another person to make all secure. The thieves must have walked in soon after she left, and oirried off a piece of plaid valued at £9 or £10. Suspicion fell upon the North Arm (of the Raglan River) natives, to whose settlement, as it has b :en subsequently ascertained, the property was taken from Raglan ; but the first sight of the missing plaid was obtained by our mail-boy, who met a couple of half-caste lads (resident among the Kingites) on the mountain, between this and Waipa, with the stolen article in their possession. As the mother of oue of the half-castes is possessed of property, and is, moreover, believed to be honest, it is expected that restitution or compensation will be made." Put Out in the Cold. — We read in the Hawke's Bay papers a rather amusing case of a bailiff. It appears that a certain publican there " filed his schedule," when the landlord distrained for rent. The tenant disputed his right and the amount, and finally got bailiff to distrain a billiard table in an out-building. At closing time, tenant asked the bailiff to pay for his bed or go. The bailiff claimed his right to stop, and tenant handed him oat to the billiard-room, and gave him a caudle to keep him' warm. The siory goes that bailiff begged in vain for blankets, and next morning summoned the tenant for assault. Before the case was over, the Provisional Trustee took possession in the absence of landlord and bailiff, who were at Court, and on returning they were confronted by the trustee and his bailiff. However, in they went, and there stayed the night. They borrowed a candle and blankets, and took it out in the parlonr, as they wouldn't pay for beds ; and as for liquor, they sent out for it, as there was not a drop in the house. Next morning, while the adjourned case was going on, the Provisional Trustee shut up the house, with landlord and bailiff outside. The case was dismissed for want of jurisdiction, and on landlord going to enter his premises, he found himself " out in the cold," where he remains unto this day. The Bench has suspended the license of the house till needful repairs were made, as the house is an old one. Lola Montes' Daughter. — A French printer in New York, Monsieur Paul Messant, was married lnst month to Princess Editha, daughter of Lola Montes and tlm King of Bavaria. She was born, in Florence, and is just twenty-one years old. The Duke of Brunswick's Heir. — Old duke Charles of Brunswick, the diamond man, lives at present in Geneva, where he has hired two strong men to guard his precious stones day and uight. According to a Berlin Vollcszeitung, the eccentric old duke has recently in.ide a will, in which he leaves all his property to Louis Napoleons's son. A Distinction. — The " Good Parsou" (to applicant for instruction in the night school) : " Have you been confirmed, my boy ?" Boy (hesitating) : " Please, sir — I don't know — " Parson : " You understand me ; has the bishop laid his hand* on 3'ou ?" Boy : " Oh, no, sir, but his keeper have, sir — very often, sir!"

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TH18710729.2.25

Bibliographic details

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE., Taranaki Herald, Volume XIX, Issue 1110, 29 July 1871

Word Count
1,302

SPORTING INTELLIGENCE. Taranaki Herald, Volume XIX, Issue 1110, 29 July 1871

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