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THE ELECTIONS.

GREY AND BELL,

The Returning Officci having read the writ for the Giey and Bell Distiiet, P. Wilson, Ebq., nominaLed W. C. King, Eso.., as a proper peison to represent the district in the General Assembly. Mr C. BnowN beconded the nomination. He had offered himself because lie thought that the Militia, who were the whole of the electors, should be represented by one who had personal exp< rience of their wants. Mr W. C. King having come forward, he (Mr B.) withdrew in his favor, as that gentleman satisfied the requirement in question. He had no objection to the late memhei, Mr T. King. Mr P. Elliott proposed MrT. King, their late member. He thought at this crisis we should show our approval of the course of onr mcinbeis last session. He had a high opinion of the other candidate,and at another season might have supported him, but it was of public impoitanec not to seem to disapprove the lhte member. Mr H. A. Atkinson seconded the nomination. He agreed with the proposer on the importance of appioviug our late membeis; he would have no objection otherwise to Mr W. C. King. The late member, it was said, did not show in the House. If electois looked at division lists they would see he showed theie, and always on the right side. His views were mature, and he had mastered all the questions befoie the Legislature : this was better than talking. No othei candidato having been named, Mr W. C. King addiessed the electors. He found no fault with the late meinbei. Ho came foiward to lepiesent the Militia. lie had been asked forme ly to offer himself, but his piivate affaiis would not allow him. Now his affaiis wete such, owing to the war, that he had no obstacle except Ins Militia commission. The Militia was. so i educed, fiom one cause or anothei, tbat that was ofless imnoitance than it had been, and he thought he could be moie soiviceable as their icprcsentative. His views on the war they all knew ; theie was no alternative, Butish authority must be established. On the Pioviucial question, he thought all matters not strictly local should be under the control of the General Legislature. He would not promise to support Ministers through thick and thin. If they changed their course, he would not follow. He thought lull compensation from one source or another should be given to Taranaki. He would pledge himself to do bis best for that. In reply to An Eluciou, Mr W. Kino said he would not pledge himself not to accept any provincial office. He had no piesent views with respect to any such appointment. Mr T. King recapitulated the events of the past session, and explained the part he had taken. He felt that Taianaki was deeply inteiested in maintaining the piesent Ministry. Their native policy, if permitted to take effect, would have averted the present calamaties, or at least given them a much better complexion. The irresponsible native oflice hadthwartedtheirmeasures. OntheProvincial questions he (Mr King) also approved of their policy. If elected he should continue to support them. An Eltctoii aßked, if elected, whether he would endeavour to put Militiamen on the same fooling as soldiers of tho line, respecting grants of land. Mr Kino said the principle on which soldiers had grantsofleredwasthatthey were thus induced to settle without any expense of passage money to the colony. The Auckland regulations had fixed the present

scale, and the above regulations gave land to civilian settlers who paid their passages. Tho Auckland regulations wore extended to this Island by the General Assembly in the Waste Lands Act, 1858. The General Assembly would not putauy difficulty in the way of tho Provincial Government disposing of any territory that might be acquired, but the moment was premature for discussing the question. Mr C. Brown thought tho present regulations might meet the case. Dr Samuels, in a speech of some length, recommended the electors to ■ support their former member, and the piesent Government. A show of hands was taken, and declared to be in favor of Mr T. King. A poll was demanded on behalf of the other candidate, and was taken on Tuesday, the numbeis being — For Mr T. King, 3i ; for Mr W. C. King, 93. Mr W. C. King was therefore on Fiiday declared to be duly elected. TOWN OF NEW PLYMOUTH. Mr I. N. Watt proposed Mr C. W. Richmond. He (Mr Watt) had seen that gentleman in Auckland, and he had expressed a wish that the same persons who nominated him, when formerly elected, should nominate him again, that was his (Mi W.s) leason for coining forward, Mr Richmond's principles, as his address stated, were before the public and weie unaltered since he last addressed his constituents. He was a firm and upright man and one of the ablest the country possessed. He would maintain the cause of the smaller provinces as that of united New Zealand. He trusted the election would be unanimous. Mr C. Brow n seconded the nomination of Mr Richmond. The seal on the writ which the Returning Officei had just read was an image of what was the state of New Zealand. The bearers were a Bishop on one side, and a Maori on the other. The firmness of the present government was working our deliverance fiom that state of slavery. In supporting Mr Richmond we were aiding that work and suppoiting law and order, and he had great pleasure in seconding his nomination. No other candidate having been named, after a short pause, the Returning Officer declared C. W, Richmond, Esq. duly elected to serve for the Town of New Plymouth in the next House of Representatives. Mr J. C. Richmond asked leave to say a few words on behalf of the new member. He regretted he was not here to make his own acknowledgements, but he knew that it was nothing but public business which pievented him. To elect a man unanimously in his absence was to do him a high honor and their member would feel it so. He (Mr J. C. R.) might be allowed to say that the circumstance was honorable to the electors as to the elected ; they had acted on deliberate judgment. Mi Richmond, though a more recent settler than many of us, had been among the first to comprehend the meiits and defects of the Constitution under which we are ruled. Coming late he brought a ripe judgment, and his practical ability had made him conspicuous among those who had inaugurated and given a diiection to the institution of the Colony. In re-electing him the constituency were doing more than express their confidence in his ability and integrity. He was identified with a great political school in the Colony. During the late stormy session of the General Assembly two main questions had occupied the atten. tion ot the Legislature. The relations of the Provinces to the Colony at large, and the Maori ques. tion, and more paiticularly the war quetion. Use had been made of the war question by the Wellington men us a stalking horse, as a means of gaining a section of the Legislature, but the real snuggle had been on the pait of the ultra-provincial politicians, ot whom the Wellington members lnd commonly been the most active, to wrest the power out ot the hands of the present ministiy. To do this the Wellington members had not hesitated to employ any means that came to hand, and the electors were, by this day's election, declaring their entire want of confidence in men who could throw every otherinterest m the country, and all patriotism.overboard lor a party object. Tlie electors v/eif declaring that, after all the losses and trials of the war, they still remained firm, they did not flinch from the snuggle which was leading through loss and danger to peimanent peace and good government. This was to the credit of the people of Taranaki. He begged again to acknowledge his sense of the honor done to their member and he was sure that member would never give them cause to regret that they had unanimously elected him. OMATA. The nomination took place as appointed in the Court bouse on Fiiday. After the usual preliminaries, Mr Hay pioposcd Mr J. C. Richmond. Mr R. had exerted himself to his utmost as every one had seen, during the last session of the Assembly, and the electors would agree he was the right man for them again. Mr Grayling seconded the nomination. When their late member went up last session an untried man, the electors had had confidence in him : now they had tried him, and their confidence was changed toceitainty. He knew the affaiis and position of the Province, and he would not spare to excit himself in theii inteiests.

No other candidate being named, the Returning Officer declared Mr J. C. Richmond duly elected. Mr R. rose to acknowledge the honor conferred on him. His colors had been irankly shown during last session, and he was delighted to be assured that they were the colors of Omata. He took the unopposed election as proving that, more than as any par . ticular tribute to his personal qualification. The signs of intense political ferment weie eiciy where visible, and some important crisis was at hand. The electors would find him (Mr R.) unchanged, whatever might happen, because his principles were rooted in his nature. Perhaps the next turn of events might place him in the opposition ranks ; if so, he would not be captions or faciious in opposition, but accept what was good from any hands. He would not refer to the more general political questions of the day. The whole mind of the coustitu • ency was bent on two or three particular ones; those, namely, arising from the war. As to the prosecution of the war, England had declared plainly that the native difficulty must be disposed of once for all. No minietry could solve tbat question but in one way. The war must be carried through till solid peace was seemed j they might rest easy on that. Then, as to their own position as sufierers in in the war. It was possible that an early 6ound peace might iuduce the Legislature to deal liberally with the question of permanent relief j if the war dragged on long, or involved other plaeci, ho was

afraid it would be impossible. But should territory be acquired, the colony and the Imperial government would, he was sure, as&ent to charging compensation on the land fund. These things mutt be handled in a conciliatory, moderate spirit. Anything like bounce when one is asking what cannot be claimed legally, furnishes an excuse for anger, and the refusal even of what may be just. The Legislature had a friendly feeling for us, but feared getting out of their depth. The Militia law would probably be amended next session. Already an important change had been made. Last session's Act classed the men liable, according to their age and incumbrancei. The hale and single men are called first ; then the bale, but married men ; afterwards, the elderly and very young, married or single. In the next amendment of the law better provision would, no doubt, be made for widows and wounded men. In answer to an Elector, Mr R. said ho disapproved of professional canvassing, but canvassing in its original proper sense meant discussing a question — none could object to discussing a candidate^ qualifications, one elector with another. He did not hope anything from the ballot. You cannot make men hide their opinions because they hide their vote ; if you could, the remedy would be worse than the disease. He would not pledge hitnulf to support a grant of land to militiamen. The giants to soldiers were made for Immigration purposes, as the drawback on passages by the New Ztfaland Company had been, and as the Auckland free grants. Militiamen, and all men ought to have full value for their labor — but land was bad coin to pay in. Thanks were then voted to the Returning Officer and the meeting separated.

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Bibliographic details

THE ELECTIONS., Taranaki Herald, Volume IX, Issue 435, 1 December 1860

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THE ELECTIONS. Taranaki Herald, Volume IX, Issue 435, 1 December 1860

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