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ELECTION.

On Monday the election of a Member for Omata to seive in the Geneial Assembly took place. Thiough the couitesy of Colonel Gold all inteiested in the election weie exempted from militaiy duty foi the day. The election took place at the usual hour in the Couit House, New Plymouth: the only candidate was J. C. Richmond, Esq., who was proposed by Mr J. L. Newman, and seconded by Mr W. I. Giayling. Mr Newman in pioposing the candidate said — " Brother eleolors of Omata, it is with feelings of the greatest pleasure that at this paiticular juncture

of affairs in New Plymouth it is delegated to me to propose my friend Mr J. C. Richmond as a member to serve you in the General Assembly. In man of my friend's business-like habits, a man well up to facts, figures, and finance; you have all those qualities in my friend. I know yon will return him with a triumphant majority. Mind, gentlemen, he is not a place hunter, he has a large stake amongst us, and in nautical parlance will always hail from the poit of New Plymouth. Omata has been a rotten boiough for too long a time, mind no more place hunters, you have an honest straightforward man in Mr Richmond who will advocate compensation for your losses." Mr Grayling in seconding Mr Richmond stated " that perhaps theie never had been since free legislation had been bestowed on New Zealand a period in which a thorough business like man of good molal and intellectual standing was so much needed to advocate before the legislature of the^ colony our rights and our losses, to shew that although the battle field has been in our piovince, still it cannot be considered as a war undertaken in our behalf alone, it is one called forth to set at rest the question of our Qneen's supremacy in these islands. In sending Mr Richmond as our advocate we shall be sending the right man to the right place ; he is no stranger amongst us, whilst he has participated in our losses. For a jear or more hib connection with the Provincial Government must have informed him of our internal affairs, and in the capacity of Provincial Secretary he has had to do with the providing for the wants of the poorer part of the sufferers in this calamitous war, and thus he must understand almost oui individual requirements towards replacing our losses." There being no other candidate for nomination Mr Richmond came forward and said: — " 1 thank you gentlemen for having placed me in the honorable position of your representative in the General Assembly. Ido not know that under the circumstances in which the island is now placed theie will be any meeting of the present House of Representatives, but it is necessaiy to be prepared for the event and to know clearly what our course should be. 1 think we have reason to believe that this war in the midst of which we now are, is recognised through New Zealand as a colonial, not a peisonal affair, as undertaken not to provide land for the settlers of Taranaki, but to determine whether Her Majesty's Government shall rule in this island or whether it shall be under the control of those who, for the time being, may have most influence among the tribes of a lace of savages. This being the case, I hope nothing may be heard of the ora political contests should the General Assembly meet now . We must, however, reckon absolutely on tins. What then is to be our course ? I think we ought to act as those who have confidence in the Governor'!, present advisers. We ha\eieason to be satisfied with them. Long and often impatiently we have played for the action such as they have now taken, and if we think they delated too long, we now see at least some reasons that we may not have seen or appreciated hefoie in favor of their delay. For myself, I have desiied a crisis, and contemplated the loss of my own propeity with tolerable philosophy, but I cannot Buy I had adequately realized the ntti'i confusion that would ensue. I was not acquainted with the peisonuel of the administration to wlndi the conduct ot the wai must be committed. I give lull weight to these consideiations now, and lan make fuller allowances for the weary delay, and think the pieseut Ministry desene our snppoit. If they deserved it less, we who approve of the war should at least now support them. They have entered on it and are responsible for it, and must be supported to the utmost in earning it .out. We may leckon too on their support ; not in exchange for ours, but because of the justice ot our case ; because we have been in the forefront of the battle, not iiom oui fault but from our position. We have shown ouiselves ready to do oui best, and we shall continue to do so. We ha\e quietly borne to sec our pleasant places utterly laid waste, and the present Government know it and w ill not fail us. Some gentlemen have enquired whether I will pro. mise not to take any place or office that may be tluown in my way as yoiu representative. I am leady to do so, but wish to observe that one who would make your confidence a stepping stone to anything meiely personally profitable would freely promise on the hustings anything or everything to get your confidence : but a man who is above bartering his trusts needs no piomise to bind him. Such pledges are in either case useless. As to properly political offices, those who object io my taking such may be at ease. I will not, howevei, even. seem to find fault with any representative who accepts such an office. If be is competent, it is honorable and serviceable to his constituents that he should do so. But lam not likely to be put to my choice. I could not oppose the piesent government. My agieement with them is substantial and general — my differences from them secondary. They aie not likely to oiler me a place among them. One leprefpiitative from this district, one member of a family, ib enough in a New Zealand Ministry, nor do I see that I could in anyway strengthen their hands. One thing you have done for me gentlemen, if the General Assembly should not meet. You have placed me on the uanow list of those exempt from military service. I cannot be put in the guard-house for sleeping sound at nights. lam tree to act for yon in other ways forbidden to a soldier—Gentlemen I thank you lor that ireedom, and I will try to make good use of it." Mr Richmond was then declared by the Returning Olficei, Mr Ritchie, to be duly elected.

The following was posted about town yesterday :—: —

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TH18600421.2.5

Bibliographic details

ELECTION., Taranaki Herald, Volume VIII, Issue 403, 21 April 1860

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1,159

ELECTION. Taranaki Herald, Volume VIII, Issue 403, 21 April 1860

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