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DETAILS OF THE JEDDAH MASSACRE.

[From the Sydney Morning Herald, November 2.] The special correspondent of the Isthmes de Suez writes as follows on the sth July last : — " You will ere this have doubtless heard of the terrible blow which has been inflicted upon the comineiee of the Red Sea by the massacre of the Christians at Jeddah. Mr Page, the English Consul, was the first victim. After having wounded him several times, the assassins tin ew him out of a window in the second story, and he was actually cut into pieces at the foot of his flagstaff, which was thrown down. M. Eveillard, the French Consul and his wife* were assassinated at the consulate j Madmoiselle Elisa, their daughter leceived a stab on the cheek from a poinard whilst endeavouring to protect the body of her father. M. Emerat, the Chancellor, rushed at the -first assassin he encountered oi, the stairs, wrenched his dagger from him and despatched him theiewith — fighting with it afteiwaids as hard as he could, until he sunk down under five wounds. He was got away still insensible. Yesterday he arrived liere in the English sloop of war, bringing with him the daughter of the French Consul and some few Christians who had managed to escape. My correspondents and old friends, the firm of Sava, brotheis, who were Greeks under British protection, have all three been massacred, together with their cashier, their hookeeper, storekeeper, aud two female slaves. A little girl (one of the daughters of the family) was publicly sold for five talaris. Eight persons were killed in that houso alone. The iron chest was burst open, and the letters of exchange found therein burnt on the stomach of tho elder biother of the Savas, the unhappy man being aftei wards cut into piccei,, The archives of the French and English Consulates were burnt, and the furniture stolen or destroyed. About twenty Greeks or Levantines saved their lives by swearing before the cadi, or judge, that they were ,ttue. and faithful Mussulmen. The pietext of this.rnajs'sacre, is pretended to be a flag question with th'a' English Cousul, but it is properly nothing of the'k'ind — the blow has been in contemplation for a long time past. The principal native merchants could not endure that Europeans

should share their trade, and, above all, that European vessels should bring pilgrims to Jeddah on their way to Mecca. These gentry have found an expeditious mode of paying the f sixty or eighty thousand talaris in which they stood indebted to the House of Sava. If the French and English Governments do not take immediate and energetic measures I know not where the Europeans will be safe throughout the Levant. We do not feel over comfortable at Suez. The Preiect of the Police at Jeddah, Addallah Moctasel, and the fifteen or twenty richest merchants who have for a long time threatened the Christians, are well known. The people have been only a mere tool which they have used. On the morning after the massacre there was great rejoicing ; a muled (a soit of Mahometan Te Deum) was chanted as a thanksgiving, and the officers of the local Government were invited to attend." Another letter, dated July 9, has the i'ol. lowing passage :—": — " 1 yesterday saw Miss Eveillard who is a true heroine, and also Mr Emerat, <the Chancellor of the Jeddah Consulate, whose courage and piowess have been so admirable, and whose conduct in the lafe affair is above all eulogium or recompense. Miss Eveillard has nothing in the world since her escape fiom Jeddah hut the dress on her back ; but she asks for nothing but vengeance upon the murderers of lici parents. It is said that in the midst of that dieiulful scene, while the head of her poor father, cut open with large sabre wounds, was resting on her knees, seeing the Chancellor, already thiice wounded, struggling hand to hand with one of the assassins, she had neveitheless, the courage to lush at the latter, seize hold of him and bite him on the arm so severely as to make him drop the weapon, which afterwards seivcd Mr Emerat for defence 'against three assailants, out ol all of whom he had wounded about twenty up to the time when he fell under the repealed blows of these miserable fanatics. Miss liveillurd has received a large wound on the cheek, between one of her ears and her mouth, which has evidently been inflicted by a blow from a yatagan."

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TH18581204.2.23

Bibliographic details

DETAILS OF THE JEDDAH MASSACRE., Taranaki Herald, Volume VII, Issue 331, 4 December 1858, Supplement

Word Count
753

DETAILS OF THE JEDDAH MASSACRE. Taranaki Herald, Volume VII, Issue 331, 4 December 1858, Supplement

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