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FOOTBALL.

NEWS AND NOTES. Each week records the name of swate prominent footballer who has given up his life for the Empire's cause. There is scarcely a chib in New Zealand which cannot number at least one player who has either been killed or wounded at Gallipoli. To their relatives, as indeed to the relatives of all tho fallen, one's sympathies must go. The sadness of their bereavement, however, is tempered by the knowledge that their's was a noble death. Several well-known Taranaki players appear among the latest lists. Stratford Club loot two of its leading men in Sergt. Dewar and Private H. G. Fearon. Private H. G. ("Jim") Fearon was a well-known resident of Stratford, and represented that club for many years. A quiet, unassuming man, ho was universally popular, and could always be relied upon to assist his club in a tight corner. He played a good solid game, and although he did not earn representative honors, he was very close to it on several occasions. His club mate, Sergt. Dewar, had a New Zealand reputation. His parents reside in PaJmerston, but he made his name in football as a member of the Bawera, Star, aod Stratford clubs, where he'gained representative, honors. He fepresertted the .North Island and 'also New Zealand in the team that toured California in 1913. Ho was a splendid man in every • sense of tho wordstraight and strong, and one who cam;mauled tho.re&pect of all who knew .him. As » feotbAQer h<* hae few squab'jn New Zealand at' vring-forwaro!; where l'.e played a ciever "heady" game. He was always a reliable player, a hard raaa to beab, but one who played the closßart of gasnM. Nobody was more popular In the All-Black team than "Norkey," and wherever tho various members of the team may be (some at the front and some settled down) they will learn of the news with genuine and heartfelt sorrow. The late Sergt. Dewar was also a boxer of no mean order. He was an engineer by trade, and at the outbreak of war enlisted at once and went to Samoa with the advance party. Returning, he again volunteered for active service, and left for the front with the Wellington Mounted Rifles. A sad reminder, remarks a Wellington paper, that in these days one cannot enter into the spirit of such an event as we did in the past met the people at the gates of the Athletic Park on Saturday —the newspaper "extra" containing the latest list of Now Zealanders who had been killed at the Dardanelles. Rugby men, of course, had their places on that roll of honor, and one of the names noticed by all followers of the game was that of Stewart McFarlane, the Petone forward, who represented Wellington on many occasions. As a footballer McFarlane wa3 admired, and as a citizen he was highly respected and was very popular. He was a man of magnificent physique, a remarkably fine goal-kick, a good all-round forward, and a player whose good humor never became ruffled by tho hard knocks or the ups and downs of the game. J. 11. Burrows is the first Okato player to give up his life for hia country At tlie, Empire's call, he, with several of his club mates, was among the first to enlist. He was fine sport, and, withal, a fine type of man. As a footballer, he played wing forward for 'h|s club, and was always "in the van in "the forward rushes that were such a prom : . iuent feature of the Coastal clubs play! Ho could also" "be relied upon to be in the forefront of the fray, where he met an honorable death. He will be much missed by his club mates, and, in fact, all along the coast.

Auckland's representatives jowneyed to Wellington, after decisively defeating Taranaki, and met the chosen of the empire city on Saturday, toeing severely defeated by 22 points to 8. A few weeks ago Auckland were defeated by Wellington at Auckland by 9 points to 5. That match . was played in wet weather, and opinions were divided as to which team would have won bad the weather ibeen fine. Saturday's game was played undtr splendid conditions. A member of the' team states the game

was of the f&st order and full of interesting incidents. Our forwards were beaten in the carl/ sta;;es, ! out, ;:s tut.garae progressed, overcame the Wellington vanguard, only to meet a solid barrier from the blacks' backs. The best team won. This is the biggest win Wellington have ever scored over Auckland, their previous best figures being 13 to nil at Auckland in 1594. The largest score registered between the provinces was in 1908, when Auckland, on their own ground, put up the huge total of 24 points to 3.

Reg. Quilliam and Dawson Webster, prominent members of the Rovers ami Tukapa football clubs, are among the list of wounded. The popular Tukapa secretary had a very narrow escape, being shot through the head. Canterbury defeated Otago very severely on Saturday, to the tune of 32 points to 9. A return match will take place at Dunedin on September 18th. Widespread regret was felt in Christchurch when it Was learned that private advices had been received that Private W. J. Mansell, of the Canterbury Battalion, had been killed at the Dardanelles. Mansull was very well known as an athlete. As a student at Canterbury College he was prominent in college life. ' He was one of the best.known -members, of the University Rugby football team, in which, he played, -wing-three-quarty-,- and., he Ircprescn•ted- ttip.'Xew•■'Zealand .University against Sydney University. He was a' very fine aH-roiHid amateur athlete. In the 191314 season he won three Canterbury championships—the 100 yds and the 220 yds flat, and the putting the shot—and carried oil', the championship cup. At the New Zealand University championships meeting of last year, held in Christehurch, he won the 220yda championship, and the 4ior|rts championship in 55 l-fisec., and was second in the 100 yards championship,' and was also second in the putting the Bhot championship. "Jade" Mansell was a member of the Canterbury centre of the New Zealand Amateur Athletic Association. He was the only son of Mr, W. M. Man-sell,-.of Cashmere Hills.

Ike efforts to raise ■ a ■ Rugby footballers platoon in Gliristchurch hnvenot met with very favoralble results. At a recent meeting about thirty members were present, and these for the most part were ex-players. The advisability of continuing was discussed, and many outspoken remarks were made. Mr. G. H. Mason said the whole business was a discreditable one to footballers. It was eventually decided to carry on, and a sub-committee consisting of Messrs G. H. Mason, F. T. Evans, H. C. Harrison, and C. W. Hervey was appointed to formulate a special recruiting scheme. - Nov? Plymouth High School boys Wily defeated footli Najjar and Falbierston North, and so retained the shieli In the first 3pells both, matches were f*irlji avai, but on cir*o#«g over the

Jfaw Plymouth boys ran away from 1 their opponents. The New Plymouth' boys' playing was very favorably commented on, their passing and combination being pretty and effective. They scored a total of 40 points to their opponents' 8. Sykcs (4) and Bruce (3) were the most prolific scorers. In the past seven years New Plymouth has won the shield three times. Palmerston twice, while on one occasion the matches proved indecisive. The first junior provincial championship, like the senipr, goca to South Tarana&i, Kaponga defeating Clifton juniors by the narrow margin of a converted try to a try. The second junior final has yet to be played between Kaponga and New Plymouth Technical College,

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TDN19150904.2.39

Bibliographic details

FOOTBALL., Taranaki Daily News, 4 September 1915

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FOOTBALL. Taranaki Daily News, 4 September 1915

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