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FROM EXCHANGES.

A gehtleman named Adama has been investigating the mysteries of the pyramids and monuments of Egypt, and has found the phrase "Hip-hip-hurrah" among the early hieroglyphics of that country. The only consolation derived from this remarkable discovery is the argument which may reasonably be deduced that the presence of these British words among ths etymological treasures of Pharaoh-land give us a prior right to the whole of the Nile Valley. And this theory is strengthened by the fact that according to Mr Adams the hieroglyphic " Hip-hip-hurrah" means, when translated, "On, on, to plunder." Something more than a mild sensation (says a London paper) was caused in the brewing world when it was announced that Messrs Allsopp and Sons were about to lay down plant for brewing lager beer. The plant will be fixed on the Old Brewery premises in High-street, where the Allsopp family laid the foundation of their fortunes. The material and machinery arrived the other day from America, and was the largest shipment of its kind ever despatched from the States. In conveying it from Liverpool 40 trucks were required, and their arrival created quite a flutter of excitement. The sum paid last year by Mr J. C. Bulteel for the Liverpool Grand National winner Manifesto was £4000 which must rank as about the biggest sum ever paid for a jumping horse, Bckesvgon has well ropaid Mr Ftead for the outlay of 775 guineas which he made in his purchase, as the son of Botchkiss won in stakes this season the sum of £1782. An English writer states that Mr O. D. Kose always sends his horse Cyllene by special train straight back to Newmarket after a race," this luxurious mode of travelling entailing an expense of something like £50. A pocket-book having been accidentally left in the witness-box of the Tottenham Police Court several witnesses were sworn on it in mistake for the Testament usually in use. Lady Lo, wife of the Chinese Ambassador in London, having died, her remains were despatched by special steamer for interment in China. For a month, the body remained at' the Chinese Embassy. At the head of the coffin, according to Chinese custom, was. placed a cock made of white cloth — the clarion of eternal mourning. An interesting example of selfsacrifice comes from Lffenbach. A young priest, who . had just com* meiced duties in his first chaplaincy, was severely injured by ?t fire which broke out in the night in his bed-

room. His burns were of such a nature that the only means of saving his life was to transplant portions of the skin of living persons to hif wounds. As soon as this was koov;|) El large number of his former fellowstudents at the seminary reported themselves ready to ondergo this operation for the sake of their comrade. Every day, for fourteen days, a pupil has come to the hospital and been deprived of a portion of his skin, which has been transplanted to the sick man's wounds. The operations have been entirely successful, and the doctors are confident of a complete recovery. For Children's Hacking Cough take Woods' Great Peppermint Cure, l/6and 2/6. The Daily Mail says : — A remarkable experiment is being conducted at the Wesleyan University, Middletown, Connecticut, by Professor Altwater. A student named Ostenberg will live nine days in a huge box, called a respiration calorimeter. He looks through small, air-tight windows, talks through a telephone to the people outside, gets air through a tube, food and drink through a specially contrived chamber, sleeps in a folding bed, uses a folding table for a chair, and exercises with a bicycle accurately registering the amount of force expended. The ventilating air is analysed, the*amount of heat carried away measured, the water is analysed, and the carbon dioxide generated is also determined. The object of the experiment v to discover the nutritive value of foods and the amount of heat and energy they furnish for the human system. When the experiment is finished Altwater expects to be able to tell how far a man can ride a bicycle on one egg, how much water he needs when he works, the comparative value of beef, sugar, starch, and aloohol, and many other interesting things. In addressing his constituents at Denniston, Mr O'Regan admitted that the Ministry earnestly needed reconstruction, but addad that the best course of all would be to leave the construction of Ministries in the hands of the House. For Bronchial Coughs take Woods' Great eppermint Cure, 1/ and 2/6. The Kobinßon South African Bank is his own creation. He owns five blocks of buildings in Johannesburg, and many farms throughout the Eepublie. The Government — with whom he is hand in glove — owes him large sums of money, and he is a most lenient creditor. He has made stupendous efforts towards the amelioration of the mining industry and he is a persona grata in Pretoria. Such in brief, is the sto/y ofJ. B. Robinson, millionaire. A few years ago, through the offices of Lord Algernon Gordon Lennox, he made his debut in London society, having Eecured for the purpose a lease of Dudley House, where he entertained lavishly, and was much thought of by his guests. Mr Robinson is a man of fifty odd years, and is tall and sandy-haired, with a small indecisive moustache. He wears a frock coat and a sun helmet in a mining camp, and 1b somewhat hard of hearing. He has a brusque, business like manner, and a will of iron. The Malaso'ogical Sooiety of Burlington House bad some strange creatures before them recently (reports the ' Daily Mail'), Major Stanley Patterson, the explorer brought them from Venezuela. He got them by sending Indians to the tops of trees, a place where one would hardly expect to find molluscs, not so very distantly related to the familiar whelk or periwinkle. Moreover, the ampullarias, as they are called, came from places many hundred miles up country, on the great forest table-land of the Upper Orinoco. Nature has given these creatures, whose true home is the water, a lung sac in addition to their gill, and they crowd to the lagoons in the rainy season, to retire to the tops of trees when dry weather comes again. Woods Great Peppermint Cure or Coughs and Colds never fails, 1/6 and 2/6. A writeb in a recent number of Munsey's Magazine gives instances of lucky speculators during booms in Wall street. An office boy risked five dollars on five shares of stock in October, and at the New Year was able to give his parents a five-thous-dollar house in the suburbs. A baker who began operations with 200 dollars, has now 50,000 dollars to his credit in one office, while an umbrella-maker, who bought shares in an electric company at 35 dollars and partly sold out at 185, eventually made a profit of a hundred thousand dollars. A still more remarkable case was that of a broker's clerk who went to a friend in the autumn and asked for a loan of a hundred dollars, admitting that he was in hard luck and in debt, but saying that he could see his way to doing something on the market. Three months later the loan was repaid, and the lender i was invited to see what it had done. The exhibit, we are told, included receipts for a long list of old bills, a deed for a 80,000 dollar honse, and bank book and document showing a credit balance of more than 50,000 dollars. It was good interest for a hundred dollarß. At Lambeth Police-court, on March 24th, Frederick Gordan Hartridge and Granville Hartridge, trading as " Hartridge Bros*" at Penarth street, Old Kent road, appeared to answer an adjourned summons taken out by Inspector Homer, on behalf of the Gamberwell vestry, complaining that on February 20th they had deposited on ther premises for the purpose of preparation for bale a quantity of meat, to wit, certain putrid sheep's hearts, 56 large tins of potted meat, eight hams, and a tray containing pieces of putrid meat and poultry bones — which was unwholesome and unfit for the food of man. There was a second summons in respect of about 5000 small tins of potted meat. — The Magistrate said the case was one in which he felt himself absolutely unable to fine, andjeaoh of the defendants would have to go to hard labor for four months. The necessary sureties for the prosecution of an appeal at the Sessions having been tendered and accepted, the defendants were released. We ('•Post") learn that there is every indication of an exceedingly busy time next season in the dairy industry, and that no less than 20

new batter factories will be set up in different parts of the colony daring the winter.- The greater number of the new factories will be carried on by farmers under the co-operative system. The impetus given to the industry is no doubt due to the high I prices for butter and cheese which have been ruling at Home aud in Australia The plenitude of grass has enabled factories to keep up a good supply, so that with a strong market it is hardly too much to say that out dairy farmers have prospects of a " rosy time." THE HABIT OP HEALTH. The constant uae of Pi&bb Soap. Mr Gladstone had a double in the person of an old doctor at Brighton, who is — inappropriately enough — an enthusiastic Tory. It is hardly safe to remind the old fellow of the occasion when he was cheered at Edinburgh by mistake, and when he tried to remonstrate was cheered the more by his " admirers," who were under the impression that the was about to make a speech. The Russian Minister for Railroads has announced in a special despatch from St Petersburg that when the Trans-Siberian railway is completed it will be possible to go around the wcrld in 48 days, as follows :— Bremen to St Petersburg, Hi days ; St Petersburgh to Vladivostock, 10 days ; Yladivostock to San Francisco : by steamer, 10 days ; San Francisco i to New York, 4£ days ; New York to • Bremen, 7 days. : A shipment of Victorian-grown tobacco leaf haß been sent to London 1 in the sailing ship Yondel. It consists of 51 tierces, each containing about 12001 b net, and comprises both light and dark leaf, but the former is not so bright as the American article. All inferior leaf was rejected, only the best being selected, the shippers and the Victorian Government, which pays an export banus of 8d per lb, being anxious to create a favorable impression on the London market, in the hops that it will result in a demand for Victorian grown leaf.

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FROM EXCHANGES., Colonist, Volume XLII, Issue 9485, 22 May 1899

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1,792

FROM EXCHANGES. Colonist, Volume XLII, Issue 9485, 22 May 1899

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