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PARLIAMENTARY.

; SCENES IN THE HOUSf.

, A MEMBBft FINED.

rj (Fbom oub own Correspondent.) Wkllinqton, August 29. WHHH the House met on Monday evening there wti an- unusually large attendance!of numbers, and the galleries were crowded with Tiiitor*. The attraction win the, expectation

e>f a lively ice»e, hope, went §o far as to anticipate a row, when Mr Yineemt Pike moved hit resolution denying the Speaker's authority to cut down ridiculoui ai.d absurd rotioii so fir v to'make them somewhat lest repugnant to eomraon sense. To the diiappointme;nt of the aiiembled multitude the erratic member asked leave to withdraw his motion, and though his friendi might be pleased that hie Talor had oozed away, thoie who came to enjoy an ereninr'i fun felt themselves iold. Then came that famous sohemt for enriching speculators at the cost of, the people, the Railways Oonitruotion arid LanS'BiU, the debate occupying-the-entire sitting. Wei? liDgton, Canterbury, and Otago were for onoe united to roll the log. The Bill was roughly handled, and its inherent unioundnesi pointed out. The Christehurch and Greyraouth line

would undoubtedly give a company enormous i power over the mining industry, and would | deprive Nelson of the West Coast trade, which - even in fhe present depressed state of ths goldßelds is of great importance. If it were compUud the Anchor line of steamers might wind up at once, and I he peoplo of your district would lose their only outside market. In a short time the several companies woulJ roll the log again, and having made millions out of the land, would get the Colony to buy the lines, and thus Nelson weuld still, further be taxed to pay the interest on unprofitable undertakings, wboae effect most certainly would be to injure its trade. On Tuesday afternoon there was a lively skirmish over a Bill sent down from the Legislative Counoil authorising the wading of the Bible in the public tchools. For courtesy's sake the first reading was permitted, but tho motion to fix the second reading was amended by inserting " six months " by 52 to 15. Iv the evening when the Representation Bill was in Committee war began in grim earnest. Mr Bas - ings' fired the first shof. He moved to strike out 91 as the number ef members with a view ostensibly to inserting 60, really for the purpose of killing the Bill. All the Nelson men had a say as well as Mr Secldon, who has entered into closealliaaoe with them. After the first burst Messrs Gibbs, Levestam, Fit I, and dhephnrd spoke time after time, thofimt and last, who are spoken of disparagingly by your evening contemporary, putting in their full share of work, to say the least. Mr

Bastings now and then took part, his amusing speeches convulsing the Committee with laughter, and Mr Seddou's power of speech was of priceless value. The Government and their supporters maintained an almost dead silence, hoping but in vain to exhaust the handful who were against them. In the early part of the evening a body of members in favor of the Bill had been told off to keep a House, and among these was a large proportion of the most pronounced oppositionists—Canterbury and Otago again of course. In the early hours of the night the sound of revelry was heard. One musical member had brought his fiddle and in the seclusion of the whips' room entranced his bretheren;with his performance. Song, loud and continuous, was heard, and thus outside there were all the signs of a festive gathering, while within those of your members previously named kept on pounding away. Whenever it was seen that a quorum was not present some friendly member, Major Harriß and Mr Speight most frequently, called attention to the state of the House. Whoever was speaking at the time sat down, the bells were rung and the Government watch trooped in. Frequently it was moved that progress be reported or that the Chairman leave the ohair, and divisions being always called for time was spent greatly to the relief of the speakers. The Government had proJ vided relays of Chairmen, who were more zealous in the cause ol their friends than oven Mr Seymour. A capital diversion was oreated by Mr Gibbs, who said he had beeu ! threatened by a confidential friend of the Government that Nelson would be punished when the Estimates came on. Mr Shepherd enlarged on the cowardice and meanness of the threat, Mr Pitt followed suit, and the matttr was growing so serious that Major Atkinson was driven into speaking/ He gave a solemn deuial of all knowledge and so ha must be exonerated but for all that Mr Gibbs stated no more than the «xaot truth. In answer to Mr Pitt's.,appeal. for an adjournment about half-past four, Major Askinson deolared he would not give way, at the samo time urging the Nelson men to do so, incautiously adding, that Mr Pitt's constituents might otherwise find it worse for them. Bullying was of no use, and still the speeches went on till daylight streamed in. About 8 o'clock the Chairman was asked to adjourn that members might get breakfast, and reluged, as by that time a fresh contingent had arrived to set the night watch free to refresh Ui»mielves and go to bed. The Ne's.>n meu were too much for their foes. They divided 10 that one part breakfasted, while the other talked. So it went on till fortunately, when. Mr Leveitam was Bpeaking between 11 and 12 on Wednesday, he was called to order, and on that a debate arose, in which Mr Collins, who had returned frota hia comfortable oouob, and Mr Reeve*, who had juat arrived by: steamer from Nelson, took part, while your junior member got a weloome -rest. Mr Biyee, who at thia time was in the chair,, whs dogmatic,' positive, and peevish as usual, ruling, contrary to Mr Seymour aud to every precedent, that all remarks must be confined to the clause immediately before the Gommittee. Then Mr Geoive questioned the -right, of any person not chosen by the House to take the chair, and a further respite was gained; Mr Westou wished to speak after the division bell had rung, and according jo anoient and inoomprehentible custom was informed he must do so seated and covered. Not haviDg his hat in the House, he borrowed one so large that he had to hold it over his head, aud if it had slipped the wee ex-Judge would have been hid lrom mortal ken. When, after this episode, Mr Levestaoa sat down, there w«s no want of time consumers." The point of crJer as to the Chairman* *tatu» was so admit ably used that some suppoiters ot the Bill wers tempted to join in the fray, and the "stonewallors" sat looking on delighted that v much exertion was spared them. When this diversion cams to an end, Mr Beeves came to the reicuo, and proved himself a moit potent al'.y. Without break or hesitation he went on, occasionally being interrupted to have the House counted. At half-past two it was ejpocted that the Speaker, as on former similar occasions, would enter and take the chair, and (here was both surprise and ditsatiifaction that he allowed the proceedings to go on without putt-ng in an appearance. Three hours had passed when Mr Kseves sat down, and meanwhile the Sehon men, who for the time were free, had consulted and seen the policy of letting the clauses, which were fevr and short, be discussed, reserving the schedule, whioh is of vast length, for the supreme dffort. The -vent fully justified them. Amendment after amendment was debated and- losi, much ( to the disgust of many who Toted for the'second reaoi >g. "Finally, a clause was added' extend" I in* the franchise to leaseholders; and thisiat 1 onoa droro »w»y:icT«aliuppottwi. • You* -

men apprehended the pos?ibility of an attempto force thfl Bill through without adjou-y----men t; MlO, it was impossible for 'he bardi •; to bo on'without sleep, Messrs Gibbs w. r, <o the time leased to recrui', returning aboiit twelve, and Mr Beeves took a snoze on a io> in the whips* room. After midnight lleem Shepbard, Seddon.and Pitt felt it safe t' leave, knowing bow well the other detach ment would do their duty, and so, after fort> - eight beurs withotst reit or a moment s sleep, they quitted the eoene of their arduous labor . At half-ptit two the House adjourned, having •at, with no cessation, site f >r dinner, thirtvtix hours. Thursday being • private member* day. th«e was a truce. The afternoon w* taken up with Local Bill., and the whole night till a quarto'to-three on- Fuday morninj with the Fencing Bill, which Mr Brycr hat taken up, as the1 Government confessed their inability to get it through, being so engrossed with naming isd drunkenness, an i the robbery of Nelson and WeatUn* of members. On Friday a fternoor, before the order* •f thesday were reached, Mr Speight m°™d> " That this House do now adjourn.' It bad been ascertained bejond a doubt tbat the Government «cant to k*ep the House Bitting till the Representation Bill was Bnished, and as a rcsr, for your men w«s of vital importance to prepare them for a week's, or if need be a month's continuous sitting, this mova was adopted. • The ' Post * says it is " the moat formidable stonewall tactic ever adopted in the New Zealand Legislature, 11 and it l* known that Ministers recognise both the skill of their .opponent! and the peril of their Bill. The Standing Orders forbid any new businew being taken after half-past ■ twelve, bo it was arranged to keep the ball rolling till that time was past. Now, the only restriction on a speaker to the question of adjournment is, that he must not refer to business on tne Order Paper or in any way before tho House. It had become known to some of the sneaking curs that infest every community, that Mr Speight intended to discourse on Pensions, and after Mr Bowen had interrupted him, and the Speaker said he might proceed, a message from tho Governor came on the very subject. The Ministerial tricksters wera jubilant, as they fancied he could not go on, and the l Post' having announced that he and Mr Shephard had arranged to taka up the whole evening they expected a collapse. They were mistaken. A complete programme had been prepared in which Mr Shephard was allotted tke task of coming in as a reserve that could be relied on for or at any time. Mr Speight without hesitation changed his niHect and went on till the dinner hour. On the House resuming, the Premier gave notice that on lion day he would move coercion resolutions, thie being no surprise aa a leaky vessel attached to the Government just now had let the oat out of the bag on Thursday night. Sir George Grey begin to epeak on the proposals as affording ground for adjournment, and wa< ruled oat of order. Then Mr Speight went ontillefcer eight, being followed by Mr Gibbs. Noxt came Sir Georga Grey, who commended your men, and condemned the treatment they had been Bubjected to. Mr Beddon kept it up till the usuahalf hour adjournment, declining to avail himself of tho Speaker* offjr to tska it aatlier so that he might rest. When he finished Mr Pitt (spoke twenty-five minutes, and thsa Mr Shephard followed for half an hour, showing the necessity of au adjournment to give the Ministry time to consider their position. At 12-25 be announced that he would reserve the remainder of his remarks for a future occasion, aiad sat down to give "Mr Levestam an opening. He kept on till a quarter to one, and thus encleria rnoet sucsessful evening's stonewalling. Mr Hall and others soundly abused your friends for the "wicked waste of time," and was replied to by Mr Reeves. At ten minutes past one tho House adjourned, a* it might, ju*t as well have done in the afternoon. The ' Post' is taking » warm ineroefc in ths success of Nelson, and hopes the Bill will be rejoctcd. In its Saturday's issue, it says, the Standing Order Committee are said to have agreed to Mr Hall'u proposal at a meeting held on Saturday morning. This is said, on thevery best authority, to be a inistako, the fact.'being, that; the Committee declined to consider the. question for variou*.good and sufficient reason*. .At one time there was a di»po«ilnn bere to ridicule your members and Ibeir alliw, whereas since coercion whs proposed public opinion is warmly expressed in thtir favor, and the wish it, a requisition is ia circulation and already numerously signed, that the Wellington City members »hould join-ia.the opposition. What may happen this week, it is impossible to say, but one thing, steins certain, your metnbars and their friendi will fight the quarrel to the bitter end.

Wblhhgton, September 5.

Thr week began with mmtered threats by ' the supporters of the Representation Bill, that they would tako oara to adopt such meaiurei as would make further delay impossible, »nd with stem resolution on the part nf Ifelion's defenders to fight the battle of justioa to tha bitter end. In face ef the coercion resolutions any euipension of hostilities: was impossible.; Itetreiit would hare been rightly set down to base cowardice. This was so clearly sew, that even the feeble, vacillating spirits were hardened for the fray, and thus the sole cffjct Mr Hall had producad. was the eonaolHUiion of the forces arrayed against him, where, measuring others by hiiown mean nature, he had counted on submission. It became known that the clo'ure , resolutions would not, An fact could not be moved in the evening, and that it was intended to let them lapse with a view to having the Order* of the day called instead, which, if done, would have forthwith landed the House in Committee on the Representation Bill, put an end to, the adjournment tactioi, and oornmencad night and day sittings, which it was intended to continue till the end of the measure was reached.. .The arrangement, therefore was* that without sitting down when prayers were finished;, Mr-Pitt, who was told off for the duty, should move that this House do now adjourn. He performed bis allotted task ,with fidelity. The Government game was spoilt, and tho'Jgh the Speaker required, time for the transaction of j preliminary business, he.undertook to give Mr Pitt priority afterward*. The Speaker referred to tho coercion resolutions, which, it had baen contended privately by the Government, did mot com© under tLe Standing Order against altering or annulling without (l notice extending over at least four sitting days," and two thirds of tbe members present He showed the unsouatfness of tk« proposition with great clearness, and so the Premier had to coutenl himself with intimating, that on a future day he would give the rtquuite notice. The trick recoiled on those attempting it, and for the time gave fresh heart to the opposition, some of the moro sanguine supposing in their ignorance that their position was thus ascertained to be unassailable, an opinion not shared in by the most experienced, who saw v still greater danger impending, Bubsequen" events proving the accuracy of their judg- : inent, Howevsr, to proooed with theoouirences of the day. Sir George Grey said a few words, and was snappishly answered bji Mr Hall, that he had no right to aak whether I lie Law Officers had been consulted, to which teir George blandly ■ replied that ho had hot done so. The Speaker then called on Mr Pitt, who spoke for about -half an hour, , mainly on Sir Julius Vogel's letter. He was . followed in a -short speech by Sir lieorga , GreyJ who protested against the cloture, and I when'he sat'down MrShephard rose and \, .took up the late Agent's lettor; showing that [ .it formed a conclusive. demonstration. of' the \ ;injury.dou«ao tta Colony by Major. Afikfr.

lori'S'panic Financial Statement in 1879. and i complete defence of the previous Ministry, tJe compared the original proposals of bir Julius with the doctrines now laid down, and ■>ccupiedan hour and a half with great ease. Mr Seddon came next, and after a time was interrupted by the usual half hour's respite. On resuming he went on till 25 minutes to 12 He was succeeded by Mr Hursthouse,

who discoursed in an entertaining manner on New Zealand} timbers, their. qualities and übos, till the clock showed there was safety for that night. He therefore sat down, promising first to continue his lecture on afuture occasion. Remarkable ingenuity was shown by the " stonewall" party on Tuesday afternoon. They turned the Clerk of Parliament into an assistant by .Mr Lundon. obtaining the assent of the House to a lengthy and quite uninteresting correspondence being read. Major Campbell plodded on for about an hour, without a soul listening, or indeed, being ' able to hear if he bad tried. Then «ame questions, Mr Beeves hating one at the end about a light at the French Pass. He adroitly censured tha beacon now being put up as a monument of the Government's folly. This drew an angry protest from Major Atkinson, who at once saw the blunder into which his ungovernable temper had once more landed him. Mr Reeves, with much adroitness, said he would put himself in order by moving the adjournment, so that he might dilate on the important matter he had referred to. The Speaker gave him the alternative of dropping the question, which being of course accepted, Mr Reeves spoke steadily till the dinner hour, resuming at half past seven and keeping it up till nine, when it had been arranged an opening should be made for Sir George Grey. He gpoke with great power in his best style for an hour and a half, commending the noble stand made by your members against the wrong* proposed, and deaouncing the Bill as calculated to hand over all power in your Island to a few ruling families. Ministers were stung to tke quick, and were eager to reply at once, but the House loudly claimed the usual adjournment which the Speaker announced. The interval had only aggravated Mr Hall's temper, and he fairly screamed with rage when his opportunity came. He abused Sir George virulently, he delighted your friends by reviling them, and was driven mad by their ironical cheers and interjected remarks. He threatened, raved, implored, and in short made a more ridiculous exhibition of himself than any previous Minister since the General Assembly first mat. Laughable as all this was, there was at intervals an indication, read only by one or two of the more experienced, that some fresh move was in preparation. The right of the majority to have its own way was asserted again and again, and it was clear to the very few competent :to judge, that a coup d'etat was in contemplation. "When this scene closed, Mr Speight rose, and spoke till 12, when his watch ceased. Mr Seddon followed, and jUBt after he had been on his feet for half an hour, there was a count out, thus ending the third day's successiul blocking by moving the adjournment. Wednesday disclosed the Government scheme. Your Wellington contemporaries say, that the Standing Orders' Committee, which met at noon, decided, that the Speaker ought to. leave the Chair when Orders of the day are arrived at, putting^ au end to any debate that may be proceeding, eveu for adjournment, and without allowing any motion to b« made. This is incorrect. Indisputable testimony is available to prove that the Committeo was never asked for a decision, but that the Speaker, said at the meeting, he had made up his mind to take this stop, .. which so decidedly favors the designs of the Government. These inspired statements entirely omit to gay, that Mr Hall tried hard to persuade the Committeo to consider the cloture resolutions, aud that he was out-voted, mach to his disgiißt. At tha same hour a meeting of the opponents of the Bill was held, 33 being present or accounted for with cartainty. In tlie face of the arbitrary determination to suppress the freedom of debate, a new plan 01. operations was immaJiately considered and adopted to fill up the afternoon, and so gain time for tho complete organisation of watches to meet the difficulty of continuous sittings. As soon as the House met and the Speaker had made known his intentions to direct the' Orders of the day to be called at half-past seven, Mr Collins moved the adjournment and declared against Ministers, making the singular avowal that he had supported them previously when he knew they were wrong. Mr Hursthouse announced that ha was now frea to join any party and that he would no longer support the Premier. A debate followed on the Speaker's ruling, which those best acquainted with Parliamentary practice feel certain it incorrect. Mr Gisborne, who had declared from the first that he would not assist in stonewalling spoke out plainly, and when Mr Macandrew railed against the practice, Mr Sheehan reminded him that he, and *130 Mr Rolleston, who now professes much virtuous indignation, had taken an active part in stonewalling abolition In the evening House and galleries were crowded. Tliough Mr Reeves rose at once to a question of privilege, which the Standing Orders state " will take precedence of other motions, as well a« Orders of the day," the Speaker left the Chair without noticing him, aud forthwith the Representation Bill was in Committee once more. Mr Seddon intercepted the Schedule by moving a new clause of which he had given notice, to abolish the freehold qualification. Mr Raeves complained of the injurious treatment he had been subjected to in being deprived of the opportunity of vindicating his action with reference to his guarantee of a certain amount of honorarium to two members of the Legislative Council, one of whom paid the difference, while the other repudiates the transaction. This went on for an hour and a half. Theu Sir George Grey, moved that the Chairman leave the Chair, and bo the talking went on till the night watch was set, and those detailed for day duty went off to bed. Messrs Reeves, Shephaid, Sheehan, and Luiidon had accepted the dreary task of keeping the Government at bay till eight in the morning. The first named began, and, with his comrades, kept up a series of speeches, motions to report progress, and to leave the chair, calling for divisions repeatedly, so that the Government watch should not gain an advantage by sleeping and snoring while their adversaries were awake and talking. At 23 minutea past 2, during one of Mr Reeves's speeches, there was a severe earthquake, the building, brilliantly lit, having a singularly threatening appearance, and as it swung to and fro Byron's line was realised " Then shrieked the timid, and stood still the brave" The members best known as boastful and bouncy rushed for the doors, whilst a few quiet men enjoyed a laugh at their scare. At 3 Mr Bryce took the Chair and was much less easy to manage than Mr Seymour- It was known that he had given out his intention to knock down the " stonewall," bat in two hours he retired completely foiled. Then Mr Hamlin came on, and tried his utmost to suppress the irrepressible little band. His loud peremptory voice, burly body, red face and arrogant disposition effeoted no more than the cadave - ous Bryce's pevishness. He triad hard to put Mr Reeves down and failed. Ha glared And fidgeted at Mr Shephard, who treated the exalted (in his own estimation) potentate to half an hour of .banter and ironical compliment, so skilfully worded and with such imperturbable gravity aB never to afford the wrathful Chairman-a chance of calling him to order.' Mr Sheehan carried on the torment, Mr Lundon took his tirn.and when tha relief party appeared charge was 'handed over precisely ia the Baatt ptate fflj 8 bourfl

before. On Thursday morning Mr Pitt, who came fresh to the encounter, began by discussing a-variety" of subjects on the Order Paper. Mr Seddon dilated on the valor and physical powers of the West Coasters, declaring that if it came to fighting they co i;J whop both the Southern provinces Ho commented on the Hokitika Electoral showing how each person woull be rj '^' by the Bill. Ha taxed the Government rfith buying four Auckland votes in 1879. TLia the Premier was aggravated into denying; but when Mr Seddim stated thai; he had seen the document and-knew Mr Hall's handwriting, silence reigned on the Treasury Bench Mr Oliver interposed to no purpose, and so did tho Premier and Mr Macandrew, who were hot against what they called^ scandaloug waste of time. When Mr Seddon gat down, Mr Levestam had a good long inning*, and was followed by Mr Gibbs. Then came Mr Tomoana, who expressed his admiration of the noblo stand made by the Nelson men. He advised the Government to effect a compromise, offering to occupy the time they were so engaged with a Maori song. The Premier was shocked, and said it would be improper. Mr Pitt thought not, and on Mr Tomoana asking for the Chairman's ruling Colonel Trimble, who then occupied the position, said it would not be more out of order than many speeches that had been made. Mr Collinß then spoke, denouncing tbe.tyranny of the Government. Mr Hursthouse followed at considerable length, and in the evening was succeeded by Sir George Grey, who, after several interruptions from Mr Seymour, sat down with a vigorous protest against hia tyranny, which called forth that unusual sound, loud applause from the Strangers' Gallery. Mr Swanson, smartiug under Sir George's remarks, made a fierce attack on him, which brought forth a reply from the assailed. This again woke up Mr Rolleston, who roundly abused Sir George and in such recrimination time passed, till on Major Atkinson trying to prova from May that tbe Chairman bad a right to stop the debate and Mr Seymour ruling to tho contrary, Mr Sheehan cleverly extracted a ruling that deputy-chairmen a< a bound by the rules laid down by their chief. The House became thin, the ministerialists coiled up to sleep, and the same night watch, with the addition of Mr Seddon, struggled through the dreary night, the further strength being found desirable, as no provocation during these eight houri could bring a word from the other side. Mr Gibb* arrived iomewhat before the covenanted time, and promptly took part. He was followed in the usual way, and so with the reluf of an occasional speech from some incautious opponent, time dragged on. In the afternoon it became known thafc there was to bo another coup d'etat, the first not having answered its objeot. Every place in the galleries was occupied ; the lobbies, io far as strangers are allowed to penetrate, were crowded ; and excitemont in the House was unparalleled. M-t Seymour on taking the chair spoke of the 48 hours sitting of the Committee, and announced that hewasdotermined to put an end to obstruction. From that tiino be would not receive'any motion to report prozress or leave the chair nor would he accept any amendments he did not oonsider bonafide. He said ho would not suffer this ruling to be disputed, and in roply to Mr To!e, that,he woull give no authorities, hia place being to rula; ami to Mr ShephaH, who asked for somo definition oi bonafide, that he would dacide each case as it arose. After Mr Seddon h.»«i once mote spoken on his clause, which after this unexampled sitting was still untouched, lit GUborna moved to report progress in order that the Chairman's unprecedented ruling might b« submitted for the consideration of the House. Mr Seymour absolutely refused to put the motion er to let Mr Criiborue speak to it, and at last, as he quietlyand noufteeuglj persisted, the Spaaker was sent for and Mr GHsborne reported to him as guilty of disorder. Sir George Grey rose and was instantly ordered by tho (Speaker, in what the calls "a fierce voice," to sifc dewn," an intimation following in the same tone, that summary proceedings would be taken against any member daring to rise while the Speaker was on his legs. Mr. Gisborno w»s ordered to explain aud then leave the chamber, which baing done, Mr Hall, with affected moderation,' aiked the Speaker to giva He Gisborne an opportunity far reconsideration. Sir M«aripa thundered out hi* refusal, aud called on the Premier for a motion on the subject. A'tor bandying remark?, that etruek hearers as beiag part of a well iehearsed scene, Mr Hall moved that Mr Gisborne should be declared guilty of contempt, and fined £20. To this sum the Speaker intimated that ha reluctantly consented, considering it a very light punishment for a rank offence. Sir George Grey moved an amendment, declaring that Mr Gisborne rightly strove to bring Mr Seymour's ruling before the House, and spcke at seme length in support of his views. A debate ensued, in which Mr Pitt and Mr Hursthou3« took part in defence of Mr Gisborue, while against him was Mr Collins, who also votad for the imposition of the fine. Me tiisborne was called in and lectured by the Speaker, whose sonorous platitudes must have been a worse punishment than the payment of the money. The Clerk and the asserter of the right of free speech retired for the cash to be handed over, the Speaker meantime haranguing the House on what it please! him to describe as tbe improper conduct of Borne of its members. The reply was given in the loud and prolonged cheers that greeted Mr Gisborne's return to his place. The manner and language of the Speaker have alienated many of bis oldest and warmest friends. His excitement was painful to behold, and no one who was present can ever again have the old confidence in his calm impartiality restored. The Standing Orders no longer afford protection to a minority. They are thrown to the winds when found inconvenient. As soon as Mr Gisborne was fined, offers of money were made to ten times the amount, and if a shilling subscription, had been, started to recoup him, tha citizens of Wellington would have made up the fine in half an hour. The 'stonewall" was no longer tenable, yet the former night watch fought on, JVIr Pitt remaining oil this occasion also. Mr Brycs took the chair about two, and fully equalled the Speaker aud Chairman. He peremptorily ordered Mr Pitt to sit down, and in every way showed ;how highly he .estimated his little brief authority. The Government were amazed that your members still resisted, not knowing the stern stuff they were made of. When the Schedule was reached, the Premier was appealed to for an adjournment, which he absolutely refused. Opposition was seen to be useless and at 7 the Colonial Treasurer, who had taken charge, consented to suspend proceedings for half an hour. Mr Pitt's amendment to give Nelson another 1 member was negatived, as was that of Mr Gibbs to give two to Motueka and Collingwood. The Schedule was finished, the Bill reported, recommitted and leaseholders' franchise struck out, reported again, and a motion for the third reading accepted by the Speaker whose night's rest had not sufficed to to restore his equanimity. Sir Geoiße Grey was repeatedly stopped iv the harshest tone and manner. Mr Sheohan moved tke third reading that day six months in a long and able speech. All your members Bpeke against theßill, and finally, after a sitting of 72 hours, the House and debate were adjourned till Monday, when the last scene of this eventful conflict will probably be played. It is only fair to say, that already some of the members who railed "most loudly against the action of your members and their : fricuas, now declare that it was the bravest fight ever

maintained against overpowering numbers. This is certain, that if the Standing Orders had not been unscrupulously set aside, the Government could never have carried the Bill.

WEiitiKGToy, September 6. The following is tha di»ision list on the third reading of the Repreientation Bill, that the word " now " stand part of the queition :—

Aps 48 : Messrs Allwright, Andrews, A-4iaton, Bain, Barron, Beetham, Bower, Hrand.>n, Brown, Bunny, Dick, Driver, J. B. Fisher, J. T. Fisher, For, Fulton, Hail, H. Eirst, Hutchison, Johnson, Jones, Kenny, Levin, Macandrew, MC*ughan, M'Donald, Montgomery, Murray, Oliver, Pyke, Rolleiton, Saundern, Seymour, Shank*, Seymour, St«v«n», Stewarb, Studhjlm*. Button, Swanion. Thomson, Trimble, Tuinbull, Wakefleld, Wallii, Whitaker, Whyte, and Wright. Ncfi2o: Messrs Baliance, Collins, George, Gibbs, Gisborne, Hamlio, Harris, W. J. Hur«t. HuMthouso, Levestam, Lundon, Pitt (Teller), Reid, Russel, Seddon (Teller), S'.eehan, Shephard, Hpeight, Tole, aud Weston. Pairs, — For: Messrs De Laurour, Jinn, M Lean, and Richardson. Against: Meesrs Ormond, Reeves, Moss, and Grey.

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PARLIAMENTARY., Colonist, Volume XXV, Issue 2954, 8 September 1881

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5,503

PARLIAMENTARY. Colonist, Volume XXV, Issue 2954, 8 September 1881

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