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DEATH OF JAMES SOUTHERTON.

(Sportsman, June Vj.) Ceicketees everywhere will hear with regret of the death of this well-known and much respected Surrey player. He was engaged this season as superintendent of the ground bowlers at the Ova); and during practice there the night before the Derby caught a chill, which kept him.in bed for several days. He recovered from this sufficiently to resume hie duties on theSurre? ground, and, on .Friday evening last was apparently in good health. On Saturday, however, he was seized with an attack of pleurisy, and congestion of the lungs, and this seizure was so severe that he died at his house, the Cricketers, Mitcbam, last night. In hi'a, day, as a cricketer, Southerton. played many parts.'' .First aaa batsman, next as fast, then as a slow bowler,' he was connected in turn with. Surrey, Sussex, and .Hampshire. The •following remarks -are taken from Scores and Biographies :— James Southerton was born at Petwortb, in Sussex, November IS, 1827, but was removed when three months old to Mitcham, in Surrey. He' was by occupation a hairdresser. 'Height' sft 6in, and weight, at various times, 9st 81b, lOst slb'and list 101b. This ."man of many.,counties" has played for no less than, three, namely, i Surrey, Sussex, and _ Hampshire. Aa a batsman," Southerton hits hard, and 'some pretty good scores will occasionally be found attached to his name. In the field good—generally at siip. In 1873 he did not play in any of the three Gentlemen v. Players matches, but notwithstanding, bowled exceedingly we'll that season, and is recorded I to have taken 147 wickets, and to I Average with the bat no less than 22 for his county, even then aged 45. 'Has already assisted his county from, first to last upwards of twenty seasons, as his name will be found in the Surrey Eleven as far back as 1854, and he has hot yet (1875) abandoned the game. •In 1875 he was stated to have delivered I in; the, Surrey matches alone no less I than 3699 balls (without a single wide), and to have obtained 8G wickets, his batting average during the same season for bis county (aged 47) being 14. In 1875 also he is recorded to have bowled 6089 balls altogether during the season. As a slow bowler for Surrey he did some extraordinary performances, and when afc his best the work that he gofc on the ball was wonderful. Considering that he was in his fifty-third year, on more than one occasion he showed good batting laßt season, and when defence was required his was a difficult wicket to get. JS"o professional player has, perhaps, ever been more respected. He was very averse to asking favors, but his honesty and integrity made him deservedly popular, and he was not only always civil a&d obliging, but thoroughly keen.after the game and kind to its followers. He was a good judge of cricket and cricketers, and in his way did much to make professional players respected. Surrey has lost in in him an earnest and hard-working supporter, and, veteran as he was, its will be some little time before the county finds one capable of worthily filling his place.

Wives to' Order—some time ago Mr Han'naford, of Auckland, advertised for a wife for a .'gentleman residing on one of the islands of the Pacific. A large number of applicants forwarded their' photos., letters, &c, for the coveted boon of wifehood. An advertisement appears in the ■, New Zealand SeraZ^intimatipg that .the gentleman in .question has made, his selection, and that the young lady is now on her way ;to h&r future borne; and Mr Hannafbrd requests, thp other applicants' to call /for their photos, and letters; "He has informed the Herald that there are several other unmarried men on the same island in want of wives'; but all; are holding back until they see the selection" already made for the manager of the station. ■Dr. Tanner's.lAST.^-The Chicago JourmVs New York co-respondent on the Ist'July sent the following particulars 6f an extraordinaryattempt by a Dr Tanner to fast 40 'days:—" Since Dr Tanner commenced to fast—on Monday,afc noon—he has lost four and a half pounds of flesh. Since Tuesday night at 25 minutes past II he has taken five ounces of water. His normal temperature shows no material change as yet. During the night he sleptl well for seven or eight hours. His face has a ruddy color, and bis general appearance is that of a man in excellent health, and under no extraordinary restraints. The third day of the fast ended at noon to-day This morning, when the reporter askedthe doctor how -he felt, he replied : 'As fresh as a daisy. Ido not feel any, particularly, disagreeable effects thus far, but I expect to at the end of ten days.' The mail left San iFranciscoimmediately after this, and no further details are yet to hand; but, from a telegram which we recently published, ib will be seen that Tanner successfully completed his task. Just at the' present time Dr Tanner's acquirements would be found very handy in some parts of the world — Ireland and Asia Minor for instance, not to say New Zealand. A late cablegram states:—Dr Tanner's recovery is exciting more interest than his extraordinary fast, which was genuine. There was an enormous amount of betting on the event. _ The.instant the faßt was concluded, Dr Tanner had a feast , of peaches, melons, beef steak, ,*nd milk, and he haieatea voraciously •iace, __^^^^^v

ITiGit Ditidends.—" JEglee," of the Australasian has the following respecting tho Victoria Fire Insurance Company :--" The Aladdin of Markot street; ha;* been providing many Victorian Nights J'lntertainißentß for-a largo number of delighted co-partners. His swap has not been in lamps, but in insurance companies. About twelve' motttha "8° ha formed the Victoria out of Ihe Victoria Fire 'Insurance Company. The paid-up capital was ten shillings per share, ,and to simplify calculation he 'just pays a dividend of that f ainount out of the first year's profits. No one will, I think, censure the directors at ,tbe meeting, and grudge the skipper, hie £23,000 for bis share of the first year's voyage in command of the new craft." • • '• .;. :.;-.■ i "Wise Men*.—Eiley Brothers, drapers, of Sydney, have spent £37,000 in advertising.in six years.. Commencing in a small way, they now employ 200 Lands, and have many branches. The firm commenced advertising'"largely in 1874. In May of that year their receipts' Were £40 & month. By April of the following year they had risen to £1017 a month. They increased their advertising with their business, and in May, 1875, the receipts had risen to £2000 a month. In 1879 the business was close upon £150,000. A Fasting Pont.-—A British pony cut off from supplies by. a fire in the Croftside pit of the Darcy Lever Coal Company, was recently taken out alive in a state of great emaciation, having been fifteen days without food or water. Tenderly nourished he began to recover at once. Jtjtenilb Smokees.—The JPeilding Guardian is responsible for the ioilowing somewhat extraordinary Btory:—"Some passengers bY rail a few days ago were 'highly amused at the precocity of a child of three and a half years of age, by name Albert Gordon. After giving an opinion on every known topic, Master Gordon produced pipe, tobacco, and matches, and proceeded to fill his pipe. A lucifer was furnished, and the old-fashioned style in which he lit his pipe and placidly smoked, would have been a subject for a painter or a physician. We are told that he has been a devotee of the pipe for over a year, r,n;l nppears to enjoy bis smoke immensely. Young Gordon is.a particularly healthy looking specimen of juvenile humanity." If JTeilding infants commence smokiDgat the tender age of two and a half years, they must be precocious indeed. Hanlas (says the Evening Telegram) will not enter a rowing shell for two months. He is picking up in flesh, and his strained sinews are relaxing. He said he could have beaten Boss at Providence in the recent regatta if he had persevered, bufc the agony was so great that he was afraid of permanently disabling himself. He says that should such a pain seize him in the race, with Trickett in November he would row the race out if he were to know he would be a cripple for life. Not a lixpocaiTE.—-In & Sunday Bohnol lesson which involved an explanation of the term hypocrite, a teacher labored very earnestly to give her class a correct idea of the word. One little girl said she always thought ifc was a big animal, and she guessed blig had seen one at a show. ' " Oh," the teacher said, " a hypocrite is a man who makes believe to be real good when he isn't. Sometimes a'man will give a lot of money to a church, just to make people believe that ho is better than anybody else."/ " Well> my papajain't a'hypocrite"!" eppke up a little girl back in a 'corner seat, "for he only gives a penny every Sunday.'? An Enobmqtjs' .Spider.— When calling on/Mr Bartlett at the'Zoplogical Garden's, he: kindly BJh'.o'wedi me the most gigantic* spider .1, ever saw—an enormous fellow ju,st about, if not quite, as big as a house sparrow , with his winga folded. When,the.epider's lega are open he. is'indeed a most formidable-looking' fellow. The whole of the body is covered with dark red-brown hair. He is fed upon cockroaches, and Mr Bartlett observed that he spins threads across the ground, in which tho cockroaches. get entangled. He also will kill and suck the blood of young mice. He Beems especially fond of the brain of the mice. He is kept in a glass case, the temperature of wbich is kept up by warm water. The bite of this spider (which comes from South America) is said to be very injurious to both man and beast. I think it. not impossible that this gigantic spider would attack and kill humming-birds.— Pbank BUCKI/AND.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TC18800819.2.21

Bibliographic details

The Colonist, Colonist, Volume XXII, Issue 2745, 19 August 1880

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1,671

DEATH OF JAMES SOUTHERTON. Colonist, Volume XXII, Issue 2745, 19 August 1880

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