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NOMINATION FOR THE SUBURBS.

On Tuesday (at noon) the nomination for the Suburbs took place at the Provincial Hall, and the Returning Officer having read the writ Mr Wells nominated Mr A. J. Richmond. He said that gentleman hnd beon their member for about Bix year?, and wag intimately oonnected with them, and he thought the electors had nothing tt urge against him why they should refuse to re-elect him. He referred to Mr Richmond aa having strenuously supported the construction of the railway, and he thanked him for the material aid he had been instrumental in getting the Road Boards, especially referring to the grant for opening the Rai Valley. He thought he deserved credit for standing up and voting against the honorarium, and having referred to the other candidates he said constituents liked a change, sometimes perhaps for no reaeon but that a new broom sweeps clean, but they might remember it only raised a dust sometimes. Mr F. Keeling- seeondodthe nomination, and he did so with the greatest confidence that ho would be placed at the head of the poll. He claimed that Mr Richmond had always done his duty well, and that his opponents had not been able to point to a single iustanee where he did aot do his duty. He hoped they would not for lovs of change put by a tried man, and get an untried, one. Mr Richmond knew all the members, could work with them, and would do more than a new man could. Mr A. Haelex nominated Mr H. H. Stafford. He had no necessity to trump him up. Mr Stafford in the olden days had been the life and soul of the place, and he did not think they uould better him. He considered Mr Richmond had been tried and found wanting. Ho waß too a resident of the town, and did not know their requirements. Had he got a road round the rocks to connect them with town ? It was said he had his father in the Upper House to coach, him up, now if Major ; Richmond had been appointed to the Speakerahip, and if Mr. Richmond did carry much weight, would not that weight have been on the wrong side? Mr Richmond was a very nice young man, and he liked the Major too, but thepe wa3 another thing, >he attended two sessions' and never came before his constituents. Ho was afraid he had, like a cat played with tuo mouse too long. Mr Stafford was an energetic man, and they ought to give him a trial. He had not anything to say about Mr Wa3tney only that he was not popular in hia own district, and that meant a good deal. Mr Stafford was, and on the polling day it would be the cry''Stafford in a canter." , Mr 0. H. Mautin seconded the nomination. Although Mr Stafford was a gentleman who had not mixed with the electors much, ho was very clear on most of the questions of tho day, and especially on taxation and on tbe land question. Ho thought he made a very favorable impression, and he was positive the electors had had enough of Mr Richmond, who, when he was questioned showed ho knew nothing of the subjocts he was asked about. Had Mr Waatnoy been as true a working, man as Mr Graham he would have supported him to tho .utmost, but he thought it bettor tuat they should throw themselves on their richer brethren than into the arms of sham working men. Mr J. G-. Hahknbss rose with a feeling of exceeding pleasure to propose 'Mr Wastney. He would abstain from troubling them at length with any remarks as to the merits or demerits of the respective candidates, but would give his reasons for giving in iis allegiance to Mr Wastney, and he then spoke at considerable length upon the topics of the day, and it was because Mr Wastney supported the same views as he held that he gave him his allegiance^ Mr Donald seconded the nomination. 'He spoke of Mr Wastney.'e actions in the Provincial Council, and of his position and.usefulness as a member of the Waste Lands Board and tho Education Board. He Bald that had thoy had men like Mr^Waatney in the House neither Sir George Groy nor'Mr Macaudrew would have been allowed to spend all the money in Otago and at the Thames, and that if they wanted a man to represent them who would do his.dutythey would vote for Mr Wastney. ■■'...-- ;Mr iUciiiioND said he did not intend to keep them | many minutes, after having explained his views ' fully at his meeting. The chief reasolr thafi oppositipn had been brought against him appeared, to be that they wanted change. Did they carry out such lv, course in their private life ? Did they get rid of lan old servant simply to get a new one? He ad iinifcted that he wus not a large contributor to Hansard,- but whilst, some men shone as brilliant , .speakers, he would remind them that others.worked Usually hard-and well in Committees' and other i ways. 'Ho did not wish to be returne i again simply I for tue honor, but that he might assist in the ; advancement of Nelson. He would ask them if he iiad, during the six years he had represented them, 'iven one single vote or been guilty of one action whioh- had been prejudicial to their interests? Utophwse.)- Gould they, point to., one;promise or ouq pledga tk%b M^d, brQl^pnr-(agplausQ^-<H; #xvA ■^-'"* m^w* ' ■ *2..". "...

he had not attended to their requirements when he had been communicated with? (Applause.) He was sure he could leave the verdict in their hands with confidence. . , . ; Mr Stafford said it was not the man who talked most that did most; ib was not the man that was spouting and making a noise at every corner that was doing tho work. If he got into the House they would hear of him, and would see that he was working for their good. When he looked into the gallery he was'reminded that he was a married man, and the father of a family ; he loved his wife and daughters, and it was for their honor and good, and for that of the country be was willing to work, and not merely for the sake of being in the House. (Applause.) He was not going there for the honorarium. He bad heen twitted with never having been a member of the Road Boards, and he could understand that, for he had always opposed their actions. He asked them to give him a trial, and if they found him wanting, he would give them back their trust. He asked them not to allow themselves to be carried away, but to sea that the men they returned were fitting for the work, and if they thought him fitted to send him, but if not, to refrain from-doing so. (Applause.) He then referred to the waste lands, and theip sale on deferred payments, and one or two other matters. Mr Wastnby had placed himself in his present position at the request of a numerous body of his fellow electors. He had already placed his views before the electors, but he would addjthat if he had spent seven years' apprenticeship he should be able to speak and work at least as well as Mr Richmond. Mr Richmond challenged them to call attention to any vote he had recorded against their wishes, and in answer he would point to his vote for Mr Curtis's Bill. He was not going to give them a lecture on horses, for he thought they would be more delighted if he let them go, and he would only say that if they elected him he would do his utmost in their interests. (Applause.) The Returning Officer then called for a Bhow of hands which resulted as followo :— ; Richmond ... 11 Wastney ~, 11 Stafford ... ... 2 Messrs Harley and Martin demanded & poll which will take place on Monday nert. A vote of. thanks to the Returning Officer, proposed by Mr Stafford, terminated the proceedings.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TC18790904.2.10

Bibliographic details

NOMINATION FOR THE SUBURBS., Colonist, Volume XXII, Issue 2596, 4 September 1879

Word Count
1,354

NOMINATION FOR THE SUBURBS. Colonist, Volume XXII, Issue 2596, 4 September 1879

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