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WRECK ENQUIRY.

The enquiry into the Joss of the Queen Bee was continued on f :

TUESDAY, Atottst 21

Edward Williamson, seaman.: The tide was at top of flood and running to the eastward, and the wind was weiterly. When we were cast off we went to leeward. Nothing was put on board by order of the captain. The captain said, " What hare you got in the stern of the boat ? " Wardrope replied, " a bag of bread." The captain said, " Heave it overboard ; you have not. far to go to the shore."

. By Mr Pitt : I saw no signals on board to us to come bacti i '■■ ;

Martin WSrikw ye, ; seaman : I heard the captain order the bag of brta"!. to be thrown out. Alexander Gardner, steward : The oaptain gave me orders übout provisioning the boats. James 8. Cross, harbormaster: I went in the Barkly to the Quoen Bee, and found her about two lengths from the rOmid part of the Spit. She is about six miles from the Lighthouse. Her head is about S. \ E.

By Mr Pitt : Poar or fire milts would be a wide berth to give the Spit. Edwards and Go's boats always sound when going round.

By Captain Johnson : The ship is at the extreme emd of the Spit, and if she had drawn two or three feet less water Bhe would have gone round. Mary Elizabeth Gibbs: I waa a saloon passenger by the Queen Bee. I remember asking the captain between 8, and 9 o'olook when we should see the red light. He said, " Not till after ten o'clock." As he came down the companion ladder he said, " Now, Mrs Gibbs, you can see the red light." I went on deck and caw it. The light was to the right of the ship. It wus about 25 minutes before the ship struck. When I came down I went to the captain's oabiti, and saw the captain, ohief mate, and steward all looking at the chart. I was struck with the peculiar expression on their faces. I heard the captain say, "S.S.Ei, Mr Baillie, that's your course," and I thought Mr Baillie looked very discontented. As tha captain went up when the ship Btruck he exclaimed, "Oh; my God, we're on the sands." I went on deck when the sun rose. The cutter and lifeboat were on the lee side. Some tins of meat and water, and a.bag of biscuits,-were put in them, and at the steward was putting provisions in I heard the captain say,! 1 What are you doing that for ? you will be 6n shore in three hours." The steward replied that he never heard of boats putting to sea without. provisions. The captain said, " Nonsense, they'll be there in two or three hours." I suggested that my small carpet bag should be filled with biscuit*. The captain eaid," Oh, as you like." I did not understand that officers were to be put into the boats. When the lifeboat was filled the order was, given to sheer her off, and let the other boat be filled. We went back to the ship once, and the oaptain told us to get into smooth water/and take the children off the other boat. He said nothing about remaining by the;veßße]: :; We had no compass or chart, and none of ui'k'npw^tnecd.ast.' . idy ,-L . : "'" By Mr Pitt : I had been below since 9"15, when I was called up to see tha red light. Mr Baillie did not^peik1 the whole time, we were in the captain's cabin. The captain made some laughing remark to me about my coming tolook at the chart. The course lie ordered was S.Swi!.' I don't remember his saying "half east." I have not been talking about the course to tha seoond mate since I landed. '

William Henrj Mason: I was third officer of the Queen Bee. About 10 o'clock on Monday night the ship's head was S.E. I had no orders as to which boat ;I should go in, and I heard nothing about officers going in them. I understood that the people ia the boats were to be arranged differently. I heard no prders about reporting the red light. , ; ~ By! Mr Pitt : tiereral of us eungoiit as loud as we could to the boats to return, and waved our hands.

By Captain Johnson : At the time I saw the breakera I could Bee land from the starboard beam to three or four points on the bow. I think if they had

'trie^ttiijr mjgbt hare got back to jfctie'sb.ip when tli^y ' ( were ,<tylj?a\'babk,.and' I' ih'ink, they were purposely. k'ept,back.V> " ,',,',„ i ",', ,' i , \^. A; .W.hylej a passenger: \ Shortly after 10, on Monday night I had.a dispute with, the dootor with regard to,th« direction of the, Spit. I placed my, pocket compass oh, the chart arid found we were steering south'. ' Dr Maucsell thin'went up and found that was the course.', Price, who was at the wheel; taid torhe after the aooidant,! 'f This is a bad job, Mr Whyte, but the oours'o I was etetring was ■ure to take us on shore." , Dr Maunsell, having corroborated, the evidence of the previous witness, said: I, had been reund the Spit b»fore/and ] thought we were Very close to the light. I told the captain when I bad bten round in steamers before we always gave it a wide berth. I heard the captain say jokingly to Mr Baillie, " They have had a thanksgiving lervioe below, but they are too soon as I may beaoh her yet.". Early on Tuesday morning the captain asked me if'l knew of any settlement to make for, and I pointed out Oollingwood. At daylight the captain'asked Mr Baillie if be could not remain on board with him, and he replied that he would if he wished it. I said, I , thought Mr Baillie was to go .with us, when the captain said, " What in the name of, fortune do you' want an offioer for ? Don't yon see land all round you ? " When the last person was put into the cutter I said, "'For God's sake don't put any more in," and he said, "Oast off." 'We were so tightly., packed that we could scarcely move. By Mr Pm 1: When daylight broke I thought we could,have rowed even against the wind to Massacre Bay. We did all' we could to get baok to the ship. Charles Gibbs, Beokett:, Mr Baillie, was in his cabin when the shjp struck. The captain, who'was greatly ezoited, exclaimed, "My God, Baillie, what have you done ? " He then said to the passengers, "You are all'right, but I shall lose my certificate." By Mr Pitt : When, the cutter left I hailed her to ' bone back, by the captainfs orders. It would have been difficult for them' to return. , ' H. H. Hilliard, a passenger:, I think it would have been almost impossible' for the boats to return to the ship, when once they had left. I don't think they wanted tp come back. " This concluded the evidence adduced by Mr Adams. George McGregor, called by Mr Pitt : I was cook of the Queen Bee. About 4 a.m. on Tuesday I heard the captain tell the steward to provision the boats well. A case of meat, some salmon, lobster, and bottled beer were got up, also some tins of bisouits. The captain was very angry at the, boatsleaving, as he said he intended to put an officer in the cutter and go in the lifeboat himself. Matthew Baillie, recalled : I never told the captain after the ship struck that it was his fault. I did not tell Mr Going we should not see the red light. There was no disagreement between me and the captain as to the course. By the Ooubt : I have no doubt about the hearings T took. The course the captain gave me, and was repeated by me to Mr Going fid the man at the wheel was S.S.E £ E. By Mr Adams: When Price was steering the course was altered to S.E. by S. Ho never had a S. i B. course given him. By Mr Going: The course I gave you was 5.3.E i E. On going below I said "keep her as she is going." I did not tell you anything about the red light. The Court then adjourned. YESTBEDAY, Attottst 22. ,

Thi man who was on the look-but had been summoned from Riehmorid to giro eridence, bat as he did; not put in an appearance; Mr Fur prooetdcd to address the Coutt. He carefully went through the evidence, aad stated that the captain and chief officer had had a long career at tea, during the whole of whioh they had never had their certificates suspended or blemished in any way whatever. The wreck was without doubt to be attributed to one of three causes, an error in the compan, an error in judgment, or a-faulty look-out, but of thi» latter there had been no eridence. That there was an error of judgment he was , was , quite prepared to admit, the distance of the ship from the light being miscalculated, but tho error was not a culpable one, and there was clear proof that erery possible precaution had been taken. '

Mr Pitt having concluded, after addressing tha Court for two hours, Mr Adams stated that the lookout man had arrired from Richmond, where be had jmissed the train, and he requested h« might be put in the witness box. i "

Charles M'Conoohy: I went on tha lookout at 10 o'clock, and was there until the ship struck. I saw no breakers, but fancied I heard"them. I hare been 18 months at sea. I was 'looking but forward with the glass when she struok; I cannot say whether I was looking to the lee or weather.side. I was told by, the second mate to keep a sharp lookout for vessels, and it was for them only that I was looking.

Mr Going, the second mate, said: I should like to address the Court' on a few points, as I find myself in a most unfortunate position, being by myself against the other officers. 1 would wish to oall at-

tontion to tha captain's evidence, in which he stated that ha gave his orders to the chief officer, showing that ha (Mr. Baillie) was in charge. There are many things I should hare liked to note down, but I hare not done so, and now I feel all at sea as to what I want to say. I wish particularly to repeat that I did' not consider nay self the offioar of the watch.

By the CoUflT,;, Did you not giro orders to tha look-out in capacity of theoffioarof the watch? Mr Going; I did give him s orders, but I should consider it to be my duty to tell him to ttep a sharp lookout 'wb §fck«r I was in bharge or not. I&% all that man could do uad!sr...fcko'oiroiimstay !*Ji When I saw what appeared to ac to be breakers ahead I want to the compass to see that the course was being steered, and found that she was half a point to the good. I wish the Court to consider whether my subsequent proceedings ware not such as to show that I was fit for the position I held.

■ The Covet : We have no evidence of your subiequent proceedings, but you eaa make any statement you wish with regard to them. Mr Going: After the vessel itrnok I want to gat the boati out. There was a good deal of confusion at the time, and I did all that I could to keep things square and myself cool. I got the lifeboat out; and passed her brer the side. I than got the cutter slung tnd had her put over the side, aid ordered the oars to be put in the boats. I was told by tha chief officer to go forward to dear the gun away and fire her, whioh I did tan or twelve times. • I then came aft, beingTery tired, and was getting some coffee when 1 was ordered away in the boat for asiistanoe. I went in her and I believe did the best a nan could do. Afterwards I did all in my power to tare those who were adrift; >< I armed in the Lady Barkly with, the passengers taken on board from the Merlin, and a few hours after started away in her to the Croiiclles, and triad hard to persuade the captain to go further, as I expected the boats would be somewhere near D'Urville's or Stephen's Island, and then when-Mr Gully asked me to go in the Aurora, I consented at once on condition that ht would go round the islands, and he iaid he would be guided by my instructions. I don't know whether it's any goad for me to tell all this, but I want to show that I j did ; not spare myself in looking: after! those who > ware

EllSßlDg. . ' i The Court: Too an quite right in,making your statement. . You. ara one of the reiponiible officers of the ship*.and<should the Court, after going through the •Tidtnce, consider you in any waj to blame for the wraok, it will doubtlesi take into, consideration youc after, efforts to iare life, io mitifation of sentence.; ,

Mr Going?: I don't know that there is anything mora I can lay. I can't keep up the run of a itory like a lawyer, and if I hay* omitted anything I hope you will exouie it. Mr Aciou Adams, in a speech of an hour's duration,' laid that in addressing the ■ Court on behalf of the Grown, he should endeavor to compress the evidence and preient to the Court the relevant facts only, and the number of witnesses that proved each fact. The captain's exouie for the wreck was the errors in the compasses. It was Bhown that the cornpane's had bean tested on the Sunday and found correct, and that at,the critical moment of 11 p.m. on Monday, Dr Maunsell and Mr Why to foond that the binnaolo conpua anted with (tain. But

admitting the incorrectness of the compasses then, the offioers might have used two' other means of guiding the ship—viz., soundings,1 and the position ol the light., In.reality it was careless steering that wrecked the vessel. The man at the wheel admitted that between 10 and 11 p.m. he was steering south ; and Dr Maunsell and Mr Whyfce provod the sama thing. If the officers knew this they ought not to have allowed it. .If they did not know it, they ought; to have ascertained for themselves how the man was actually steering on rounding suoh a dangerous i point.. The learned counsel further pointed out that I no sufficient attention was paid to the red light, and - that the chief officer ought not to have gone below while they ware nearing it. If ha was held to have been in .charga, then he was to blame for this ; if not, .then the captain should have remained on deck. Both wars below when the vessel struck. Indeoision was shown in manning and provisioning the boats, and though no doubt the captain intended to put an officer in each boat, yet ultimately the boats were compelled to leave without an officer or proper com plement of man and very few provisions.

Tht Court than adjourned, and on resuming at four, Mr Bboad delivered the following judgment: i —That nothing of any importance appears to hava occurred on the voyage to Nelson until after passing Cap* Fan well, except' that ■ the compasses did nob work well. It iiemi that no azimuths or amplitudes wire taken to ascertain the error. Oa Monday, ths ■6th August, the roisel opened Cape Farewell Sandspife Light, about 8 o'olook p.m., and from this up to 10 I o'clock the courses appear to hare been from NVE. by B.toS.E. by E. The.wind at the time was fair, about Wait, the vessel was going about 7 knots with all square sails set and the .night fairly dear. The loom of the land orer the Spit could be seen, but the Spit itself and the surf could not be seen, although the latter was beard all the way along. There is a discrepancy in ;the evidence as to the courses steered :from 10 to 11, but it seems moit likely the vessel had Bade more southing than the captain and chief mate thought, bridging the vessel closer in shore than was estimated. At 11 o'olock the bearing of the light was taken by' the chief officer and master, and it was estimated to bear W. by S. 7 miles, but it is now :evidentthat the vessel could not have been in that position. The captain then put the ship on a S.S.E. course. ■ The evidence differs as to the course given, but I think the weight of testimony proves it was 5.5. E.," arid not M the";captain and mate say, 5.8. E., iE. Had the lead been cast at this time it would ' have been' found that the ship w &b not in the position assigned by the master and mate. But as a matter of fact the lead from first to. last was not cast at all, and I am of opinion, that it was. an extraordinary neglect of duty to neglect taking soundings to verify the ship's position1 when tailing round a spit with a compass which; was believed to be unreliable, and on which the master ought not to have exclusively depended. The vessel was kept upon the S.S.E. Course until grounding at' about half-past 31 to a quurter; to 12 p.m. Before grounding, surf had been seen on the starboard bow in the distance by a man aloft (this w*s about ten minutes before she struck), who also came down, and saw it from the deck, but did not report it. It was also seen some minutes by the second mate and one of the saloon passengers from the poop. All these witnesses estimated it to be from four to five miles away, but it is evident they must have misjudged the distance, as there could not have been any surf four miles beyond the Spit. Had the helm been put hard up wbcn these breakers were first seen, possibly the vesiel would have been saved. Every effort appears to have been made to get the vessel off, without success, as within a short time she filled with water. The only bearing taken was at eleven o'clock before changing to tne last courae. Had the bearings of the light been taken at 8 o'clock on first observing ib and1 agairi: on entering the red light, the error in the compsßS on the points the ship was heading 'at both those times might, have been discovered. The explanation offered that the compass was always wrong on a S.S.E. course was a strong reason why the captain should have remained on deck and not have placed implicit reliance on a compass he believed to be unreliable. The master is primarily responsible for tho loss of the ship. It is clear that he was in ignorance, of his true position, and he did not use proper and sufficient means to ascertain his whereabouts. In this he was guilty of grave default. The chief mate acted throughout in concert with the master, and assisted in the navigation of the ship. The captain appeared to depend upon him a good deal oa account of his previous knowledge of the looslity. He erred aa much as the captain in judgment, but of course technically the whole responsibility rests upon the master. The look-out was not, in my opinion, well kept, and it waa the duty of the officer of che watch to see to this. In the loading of the boats I think the master erred in judgment in not so disposing the passengers in each as to avoid the necessity of transhipping from one boat to another. A full complement of oars ought also to have been put in each boat in the first insUnee. Otherwise, as I beliave he contemplated the return of the boats to the ship, I do not attach any special blame to him. But in this, as in some other matters, the master appears to have intern ded to do what was right, but, apparently, indecision of character caused his good intentions to remain unfulfilled.

The Nautical Assessor fully concurs in the foregoing decision. And baring decided that the ship was lost though the default of the matter, John Sayes Davis, I decide to suspend his certificate for three years, and as I am further of opinion that there was default contributing to the loss on the part of theseoond mate, John Earnest Going, I deoide to suspend his certificate for ■ix months. The chief mate, although in as grave error is the captain, was not responsible, and I have therefore no power to punish him. Mr Adams applied for costs against the Captainß but the Court thought it better to adjourn the question until to-morrow morning at 11 o'clock.

Political. —There were rumors in the lobbies this afternoon that Mr Whitaker, chagrined at the intended abandonment of the Native Laads Court Bill, will resign. TSVe hope tne rumors have foundation. It is also currently stated that the Hon. Dr Pollen will resign at the close of the session, Post, Aug. 16. ' MoBfSTKB Pbtitions.—The petitionig in favor of the Local Option Bill, presented by Mr Fox, contain the signatures of about 15,000 persons. One from Auckland, against Sunday trading, presented by the . same gentleman, is' 153 ft llin in length, and contains 44^9 names; another from the same district, praying for more stringent licensing lawsjiß;l37ft4in in length, and bears 4788 signature. ' r '''\ '.'...... \' ■- '"': -.liEGAXi) Abbat.—Amost formidable array of counsel will do battle on the respective sides in the great Tffafca -Maori libel case, which is to be tried on the 27th inst. The Government has v r«tained for the defence Mr Connolly, Mr' Gordon Allan, Dr Buller, and Mr Chapman. The plaintiff has retained Mr Barton; Mr Travers, Mr Macassy, and and Mr Stout. Messrs Izard and Bell fare splitifcors for the plaintiff, and Messrs Buller .atd'"ijowis:'for.'tiio'<3«f«ndienta.'. ~

A ikiNATFBE Pony.—The curious little pony 32 iachei high, which arrived in Dunedin bn the Kingarootria the other day, has been iold by auction for £50. It was bred in France, and is just turiiad six.years of age. Sixty-four additional acjes of land are to be reclaimed from the sea ai Wellington. A loan of £100,000 is to be obthined for the

purpoie. \ uue Tkadb with Other Countries. — From .returns,jußt ipublished by the New Zealand Gtofernment, we extract thmibllow-

ing figures, which show the chief commercial transactions of this Colony last year with other countries: — Imports from. Exports to United Kingdom 4,451,269 4,533,389 Franoe ..... 10,765 United Stales of America: On the Atlantio 163,305 60,763 On the Pacific 28,982 8,158 India—Bengal 25,789 55 Mauritius 155,740 3,032 New Caledonia 1,634 6,212 China...... 66,709 28,623 New South Wales 616,601 219,485 Victoria. 1,169,734 *651,381 South Australia 38,514 66,757 Tasmania 103,783' 7,583 Queensland 10,130 3,759 Fiji Islands 20,176 17,321 Tonga „ 5,491 25,364 Cook „ 9,081 9.733 Ladrone Islands 4,974 Norfolk Island '920 4,180 Whale Fishery 8,252 1,854 *The exports to Victoria include £470,262 worth of gold. The exports to, China consisted of fungus (£6,224 worth), and gold, the latter taken by Chinese miners. The die has just been executed for the new monogram to be borne on the note paper in use at Windsor Castle. It consists of the three letters Y.E.1., surmounted by the usual crown. The addition of the " I," standing for " Imperatrix," has given riae to some comment.

The native chief Wi Tako Ngatata seconded the Address in Reply to the Governor's opening speech in the "Upper House yesterday afternoon, and made a very good speech, during which he paid a high tribute to the memory of the late Native Minister, Sir D. McLean. If wq remember rightly, this ia the first time , that a native member has seconded an Address in iteply to a Governor's speech in the Legislative Council. . i

It is rumored that a strenuous effort will be made to secure the appointment of Mr. Stafford aa Agent-General for N«w Zealand, on the expiration of Sir Julius Vogel's term of office in December next. It is known to be Mr. Stafford's intention to visit England shortly after the close of the session, and it is understood that the Canterbury members are exceedingly anxious that he should be installed in the Agency-General, as successor to Sir Julius Vogel, ane that they will strain every nerve to bring about the desired chaDge.— Post. \ The Kuriwao freehold station, Clinton, Otago, has changed hands, the purchaser being Mr George Proudfoot. The price is £30,000. !

An albino of the New Zealand crow, and a tui with brown plumage, were exhibited at a recent meeting of the "Wellington Philosophical Institute. ; Dr. Nesbitt, the Keaident Magistrate of Gisborne, Auckland, died a few days ago.

Dira-EDiN Towir Hall.—The following is the result of the competition for designs for the Ducedin Town Hall:—lst premium, £200, Mr T. B. Cameron, Auckland; 2nd, £100, Mr E. A. Lawson, Dunedin; 3rd, £50 Mr George Brown, Melbourne. Six other designs were sent in. lioss.—A party at E'edman's rush, Eosa, "Westland, has struck a lead of wash which cave a prospect of two and half to three grains of gold to the dish, with a fair depth of dirt.

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Bibliographic details

The Colonist, Colonist, Volume XIX, Issue 2274, 23 August 1877

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4,261

WRECK ENQUIRY. Colonist, Volume XIX, Issue 2274, 23 August 1877

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