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THE ELECTIONS.

NOMINATION FOR THE SUBURBS

On Tuesday last the nomination for the District of the Suburb* cf Nelson took place in the Provincial Hall. After the Returning Officer had read the writ and called for nomination*,

Mr Welt,s said he had very muoh pleasure m nominating Mr Andrew James Richmond a« a Stand proper penon to represent the suburbs of Nelaon. Mr Richmond had been their member for the last three years, and so far as bis knowlrdge went he had represented them fairly and judiciously.- Mr Richmond had supported the G-ovemment in the Public Works and Immigration scheme, and also in the Abolition queition. He was acquainted with MiRichmond's character, asarepresentatire for a number of years past, when that gentleman represented Oollingwood, and he bad always found him very zealous, particularly regarding local business, and veryjudicious in attending to their wants. He (Mi Richmond) had always held a very good position in the House, and he thought they could not do bettoi ,than re-elect him. The great Public Works scheme, and alao the Abolition measures were only half completed, and they would be better carried out by naeu acquainted with them than by strangers. Mr Keixins seconded the nomination of Mr Richmond/ At the last contest he retired in favor ol Mr Rithmond. [A JoiOfi : You were well paid for it. Mr Kblhng: If'the gentleman has anything to say he will perhaps wait till I have finished] H. continued: He did so in order to gain their cause by securing the return of a member on their side, and it was strange to say that Mr Bout was one of those who induced him to mOm; but Me Bout iuwL since

changed his opinion. At far aa the Immigration and Public Works schema was concerned, Mr Richmond had fully carried out tho.-e political prin&lplw for which he had been elected. Since that time the abolition question had arisen, and Mr Richmond had given it his support He oould not find whether Mr Roufc opposed it or not. They knew that Mr Richmond would be a '.rue a faithful representative of the people and that he would do what he promised* Mr MAtcoiiM ros .'to nominate Mr Rout asi a fit and proper person to be their representative in the House. He did so, not from any personal friendship, buton the conviction from the views he (Mrßout) had expressed at his different meetings and he was jure that he would, to the extent of hia. ability, carry those views oat. Th«y should send men to the House who would see that justice was done them. He referred especially to the Consolidated Loans and the Immigration and Public Works scheme, they had tsot received the proper amount of consideration which they should have done. He thought that in returning Mr Rout they would return a man who had not only shown himself to the fore in matters political and agricultural, but had shown that he had the interest of the towa and country at heart.

Mr Mabtin came forward as Mr Rout's seconi«r.: Mr Rout had always taken a great interest in country and town, and had always done his best for his fellow colonists. He would b» a fair representative, and would not only express his own views but would also express the ..wishes of his constituency.;; Mr Richmond, as their member, had simply followed the lead of the Grovemmont, and he had not seen that he had over expressed any of th», views of fcne electors. Hedidnot think "that Mr Richmond's,three years experience any advantage. There was one other question he wished to refer to. He had ie»n a number of anonymous attacks in the papers on Mr Rout's character, but in no case had he heard any one of those inuendoei established, he thought those attacks were m ide by Mr Richmond'^ friends because they were ashamed of their own end*, and they onlr showed their dislike to the individji»j_njojb r ta--ttre candidate. He seconded Mr R>ut s nomination. Mr RroHJroiTD s*id that he had addressed them at the public n.eetinga he had held, and had had personal conversations with many of them, and he had touched upon all the important questions before the country. He had served them three years and during that period he had never hea"d one single obs»rvation of disapprobation of his actions, and at each of his meetings he had asked.any elector who was dissatisfied, to come forward manfully, but he had the honor to tell them that no ona did so, therefore he concluded that he still held the confidence of his constituents. He concluded by assuring them that if re-elected he would oontinue to serve them as honorably, faithfully and steadfastly as he had done for the paat three years. Mr. Rout said he thought ho ought to apologise for his impudence in coming forward, for it seemed from an aoonymous letter which had been published that there was a natural governing class there, and it was impertinent for him, a clerkly drudge, to offer himself. However, he stood there, and asked them for their suffrages, and he hoped they would support him. MrEelling, he thought, had changed his opiniomsince supported Mr Richmond. At that time they wanted to get the benefit of Mr Vogel's immigration and public works scheme, and they returned Mr Richmond, not because of his transcendent abilities, but because he would support the Vogel Ministry. In the anonymous attacks made on him he had been described as a cuckoo trying to drive Mr Richmond from his nest—but was it his nest? They would see. If Mr Richmond had not personally written these letters stil he was answerable for the actions of his frienda. A scurrilous article signed I? had appeared in the Evening Mail, which was no credit to the writer. That gentleman was sometimes funny and when funny often fool:sh, but on this occasion he had been ferocious. They could not attack his arguments nor his position, so they attacked him personally. In the attack made some individual had said that his ory of economy wai baseless, bnt he would say that when the prei»nt Government took office there was an overdraft of £14,000 but, they had paid off that ajd last quarter they had £11 to the good. He thought it unfair to allude to a man's origin. His father had never bad the benefit ot State aid, but that was no disgrace to him. Misrepresentations had been made regarding what he had said about Road Boards. He did not want to slander a numbor of gentlemen who sat on those boards ;■ his allusions were made to those outside districts where the men were more noted for bone and sinew than for refinement and education, and to them it would be exceedingly difficult to loie their time in arranging matters they wer» not accustomed to. He thought his views were pretty much in accordance with their own. Mr Richmond he did not think had any views—at least he could not see from his speech what they were—more particularly as regarded education. He did not know that he had any more to say, but he had felt himself bound to refer to those things to which he had called their attention. The Returning Officer then called for a show of h&ncls, which resulted as follows :— .

Richmond ... 20 Rout ... ... ... — 8 Mr ROOT demanded a poll, and tha Retubnibtg OtfMCER intimated that tho polling would take place ou tbe 30th instant. A vote of thank» to the Returning Officer closed tho proceedings.

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TC18751223.2.10

Bibliographic details

THE ELECTIONS., Colonist, Volume XVIII, Issue 2009, 23 December 1875

Word Count
1,265

THE ELECTIONS. Colonist, Volume XVIII, Issue 2009, 23 December 1875

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