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PROSPECTING.

Our Collingwood correspondent has supplied us with the following jounal of a prospecting party, which was handed to him by Mr. James M'Keuzie. 7

I have much pleasure in sending a short account of a prospecting tour made by myself and party. Wo left Collingwood January 5, intending to profpect the Anatori or Big River, and-reached the Maori pah, at Tini, same evening. We found the Gipsy lying there with 15 passengers. January 6.—Heavy rath in the morning; reached the abandoned store of Scriraagonis at evening. January 7. —Made theNutura Creek,also called the White Creek, same evening. Took the beach road, and camped on the south side. Plenty of eels and wild pigs. . j January B.—Made the Big River or Anatori at eight a.m.; went up and viewed the river about four miles; returned to camp same evening. January 9. —Shifted camp up the river about ten miles; tried several dishes, and got gold in almost every dish, but not payable. .

January 10.—Staited up river again about seven miles, prospecting all the waj ; got gold in almost every dish of washdirt, not payable; found some fair prospects in the rocks by breaking it up. The river very rough with large boulders; the gorge has steep precipitous sides; bed of river under water, having no bars; the boulders are larger and the, stream more rapid. •

January 11. —Tried to bottom somo bars, but could not get down for water; we were down 3 ft. below the water level; washdirt loose, got only the color. ' The weather looking dull and like rain we turned and went to an old camp at mouth of the river, with the intention of trying the first fork, so soon as the weather was favorable.

January 12.—Weather looking dull, remained in camp all day. This river has only one fork, and should the i iver prove payable I am of opinion the left branchwill be more payable of the two; the river has all the appearance of being subject to freshets about ei^ht feet high: water clear and bright; sides of river where flat lined with tutu and fuschia; the spurs are more or less wooded. January 13.—Went up the right hand branch of same river; tried several dishes without success all the way up; could not get the color; got four or five specks on the point where we camped. January 14. —Went about eight miles further up the river, prospecting all the way; got nothing, barely enough to swear by, and that principally by fossicking. River running flat, with long reaches, having small bars, and a nice blue slate bottom, soft and shallow; went to the top of the range and saw a nice quartz range country; proposed to' follow the river down to-morrow, and strike the range from the beach.

January 15.—Struck camp and followed the river down to our old camp on the beach. : January 16— Crossed the Anatori River, and went along the beach for six miles to a river called the Tururoawhiwhi; fpllowed it up to the gorge and there camped ; went up the river about six miles and took up a spur to make the quartz range we saw on the 14th, found we were too far up the country; tried to fire the bush, unsuccessful, no wind blowing ; came down the river to cakmp, tried two dishes in the rocks, got about fifty specks of fine gold to the dish. '.....• January 17. —Struck np the hill over our camp and made the quartz range; found them covered with thick manuka, fern, and rushes; set fire to the bush, put down a hole for seven feet, having a nice washed quartz, no color; intend to bottom to-morrow. Followed the river up the gorge for four or five miles, tried several dishes, got gold in every dish; the bottom and lull on each side are granite, the boulders for the most part the same. As we got into the gorge there was little washdirt, the rock in the river more like huge masses of washed rock than anything else. January 18.—Went up the range, our fires still burning i put a hole down in bed or a creek, found nice quartz, wash, and cemented sand at five feet; the stuff so hard that a man could not sink more than two feet a day. I believe the ground goes deep; could not get the color; took a walk over the the to see if I could find rock cropping out or" shallow ground, could not find it. From the appearance of the country I think the ground is all deep, the wash and the cemented sand shews itself in several places ten and fourteen feet thick; it has all the appearance^ of the wash in Lightband's Gully and McCartney's Hill; plenty of black sand. •

January 19.—Weather dull and rainy looking; our flour getting low and the gronnd so hard and deep to bottom we started home at three p.m., and made Mutura Creek and camped. January 20 —Reached the Tini pah. January .21.-—Started to prospect the Patarau River; went Up about six miles above tho mooring pl»ce and camped; tried several dishes, got gold ro all; appearancft-of the riyer mor»like Slat*

Rivevthan any of the rivers I tried; the bottom to-day is day date and blue alate. January 22.—Went up the rirer about- fire miles further ;Uied several places on-the road up, got gold, in every diil^and^ a good paying prospect at the bottom. In some places the nver^iancbea pflF in two directions; the main stream runs to the left hand, the stream on the right is a slow running stream; the water has a swampy appearance, the other is clearer and more rapid; went up the right hand branch about one and a half mile, and got gold wherever I tried; had io make my way back .to the pah for want of provisions. . '.-■ January 23.~Left the pah early and reached Collingwood same evening. I am induced to think the Patarau, River has the appearance of being the moat^axable, river I have peen on from Wanganui to Turnmawhiwhi; I have found gold, on: the hills there is good quartz wash.,, I do not wish; ;tp. mislead any person wishful to go there, at the same time I believe it to be a good payable goWfieldjb^t to cany grub there is too much for any man to do for a constancy. ; - ; f > I am informed the Maoris have offered to spend £100, provided the Government will spend tho remainder, in making a good track over the ranges. In other parts where I found gold payable I could have stopped and; made a few ounces, but as I wasmerely prospecting I pushed further on. I may mention there are some overhanging cliffs of Limestone at the mouth of the Anatori River, which form a splendid depot for stores. From the great extent of country it would take more time: to prospect it thoroughly than I could afford. < ■:

■ N.B.—-There' is every appearance of the whole district of the Taitapu being auriferous. ,

the Volunteers.

serious disturbance has occurred here, which has not been queMed without los 3' of life. For some, time past it has been the custom on several estates here to issue to the labor ers employed on them rum, sugar, &<j, in addition to their regular wages, and the withholding of these allowances was the apparent cause of the fi st outbreak, which took place about four weeks ago upon an estate on the windward sid

Cblotoial Secretary's Office, Auckland, V ; 22nd January* 1863. ; n To Lieut.-Colonel Balnea Vis, Deputy-Adjutant General of Militia and Volunteers. V, Sra-4 have the honbr, by the direotioofof Mr. Domett, to communicate to you the views df the Gpyernni' n? uith respect tb the; enrolment of iv the different Provinces of|:New Zealand. ...

2. The Government regret that in the Northern Island, where the necessity for local forces is the greater; the Volunteer• movement lias not in the several Provinces, with the exception of Taranaki and of the districts of Wanganui and the Hutt, made that progress which might have been i-etson-ably anticipated. . ••. . ; ; ' 3. This result has, no doubt, arisen from a variety of causes to wWe'i i!. a riot'now necessary to advert, inasmuch us ilc vi ject of this letter is not to impute blnine to any one for the past, but to state explicitly1 the course which the Government wish to take with respect to the future. 4. The Regulations, under which the services of Volunteers are accepted, now in force, are, as you are aware, those constituted by an Order in Council dated the 16th of January, 1862, and published in the New Zealand Gazette, J^o.^ of the 20th of that month. The Government would infer, from the disinclination shown by the Volunteers to enrol themselves under their provisions, (hat they are not generally acceptable,; but the Government are not aware what special objections ate entertained towards them, or. what alterations (beyond those already promised) are desired. The Government are, however, fully disposed to make such reasonable modifications in them as the.: well ascertained wishes of Volunteers, find of those whowish to serve, may indicate. t>. Orders have been sent by the last mail to England for the supply of 1750 uniforms, and it is the intention of the Government to furnish them to Volunteer Corps without cost, on condition that the Legislature of the Province in which those Corps are enrolled contribute one-third of the expense. This Provincial contribution is requisite, both on account of the limited funds at thedisposa] of the General Government, and also because it is only equitable that the particular Province which benefits by the presence of an organised Volunteer force should bear some special share of the expense of that organisation. . / 6. The Government will of course continue the supply of arms and accoutrements as heretofore, and they will use every effort within the means at their disposal, by the supply of ammunition, the payment of drill instructors, the laying' out of proper mine: grounds, and by other modes, (0 assist the Volunteers in rendering themselves a disciplined and efficient force. The, Provincial authorities will, no doubt, co-operate in the same direction. • . '

7. It is higlily desirable in a colony^ on j many accounts, tlmt effective volunteer forces-should beformed for self-protection (which of coarse is theonly object in view) rather than that the Militiat should be called out for training and exercise, for,, with Volunteers, the services of alle and willingmen in the prime of life are secured without an injurious interference with industrial pursuit!, while, by calling out the Militia, the progress of colonization is materially retarded,—where, as in a colony, labor is of such value, and a large portion of the male population is not restrained by any ties from immediate migration,—and a serious blow is struck at the'very root of the ability of the colony to assist itself, and to contribute—as it has done for the last three yeara to such, a considerable extent in proportion to its resources— towards the expense of its local defences. ■ 8. It is also expedient that a volunteer movement should be conducted simultaneously with the calling out of the Militia for drill, for although the ranks of the Volunteers would be nominally swelled by the adhesion of many who prefer that service to the militia, a real injury would &c inflicted on the volunteer cause by this fictitious enrolment (followed as it would be by a sudden reaction as soon as practicable) in additions to tho evils to which I have referred as likely to arise from calling out the Militia. 9. It is, however, impossible that a state or affairs should permanently continue here in which* neither the colonists voluntarily enrol, nor the v government take any steps for calling-out et Militia, and the Government fully trust that, when their intentions with respect to the. organization of volunteer forces are generally known, the accession to these corps will be such as to render them creditable to the colony, and effective for that object which so vitally affects the colonist! themselves.

10. I am to request you to forward a copy of this letter to the officers commanding the Militia and Volunteers in each district, with a request that they will give it every publicity ia their power.

I have, *c., '/; W. GisBORNE, Under Secretary.

Lancashire Relief Fvhd —The Taranaki Beraldot' January loth, says that tho gentlemen appointed at the public meeting on Saturday-the 3rd, to collect subscriptions to the above fund, have been busy during the past week; and the result has been that £319 4» Were sent home yesterday by the English mail. The subscription is still going on, and it ismost satisfactory to see the liberal-spirit with which the call: has been met. ■■■•■•

Holiday.—Sunday next being the twenty-first anniversary of the Nelson Settlement, the following day will be kept as a holiday at the Governmeut offices, banks, &c. Why ..this should Dot be made a general holiday, as in other provinces, ws cannot imagine. We trust that this year will,be the forerunner of such an event.

Meetings.—A. meeting of the trustees of the Savings' Bank will be held at the Chamber of Commerce this evening.. A general meeting"of Shareholders ia the Nelson and Marlborough' Coast .Steam Navigation Company is appointed for Monday evening next at the Trafalgar hotel. A lecture by Mr..D«ck is also advertised to be delivered. at the Temperance Hall, on the evening of Monday next; subject, • The Tabernacle in the Wildaruess,' illustrated by 4'model and drawings

The Mails.—Having been at time* compelled to notice shortcomings oh the part of our,postoffice officials, we as justly, but with much more satisfaction, refer to the despatch that was used in the sorting and delivery of the letters and papers belonging to the last English mail,arid the quick way tot which the greater part waedwpoaed of,' 1

Dun Mountain.—Wo understand that for a time the proceedings of the company will be stayed, as far as regards the chrome workings, and that the men connected with that portion of its operations have been discharged in consequence. Tho timber, lime, and flagstone business, however, will bo prosecuted as usual. The temporary suspension of this portion of the worka is attiibutable, wo believe, to the itagriaut state of affairs in the cotton manufacturing districts at home, and which, for the present, precludes'any prospect of a demand commensurate to our usual rate ot supply.

Flax.—A.' Gazette' has just been published in which are offered the rewards of £2000 for forty tons ; £1000 for the next forty tons ; and £1000 for twenty tons... Oncjperson. cannot, receive two prizes. The present Government hns hrought this again before the public in conaequesico of a letter received from a gentleman in Leeds, of which tho following i*an extract: —" The fl»x could bo made veiy serviceable and' of universal value to our manufacturers here, in the present state of tho flax market, as we are now paying £10.to £-20 per ton wore for all kinds of flax than we were last year.' 1

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Permanent link to this item

https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/TC18630130.2.10

Bibliographic details

The Colonist, Colonist, Volume VI, Issue 550, 30 January 1863

Word Count
2,518

PROSPECTING. Colonist, Volume VI, Issue 550, 30 January 1863

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