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AUCKLAND.

THE ELECTIONS. [We have received Auckland papers from the 19th December, 1860, to the sth January 1861. The most striking features in these are the electioneering addresses, of which there are not less than twenty, so that there will be a contest for many of the districts. We give the following extracts from some of these.] AUCKLAND CITY EAST. Mr. Russell says:— Upon the great question which has agitated New Zealand—the Native War—l will support the present or any Ministry who will prosecute the war until British law and au'hority* shall be the only standard for both races; but upon many other questions I am opposed to the present Government. I think their policy in many respects injurious to the Colony: they have squandered the public money,—creating an enormous establishment, —and are still fast plunging us into debt. I will endeavor to bring the public expenditure within proper limits : I think one-third of it might be cut off without injury to the public service. I believe it to be of the greatest importance speedily to check the encroachmonts of the General Government upon Provincial Institutions. I shall, if elected, use every means in my power for that purpose. I will also endeavor to procure for the Provinces the largest possible share of the Revenue of the Colony—a share much larger than that doled out to them by the General Government. Mr. T. S. Forsaith merely appeals to his former conduct in the house as a • fearless and independent man.' AUCKLAND CITY WEST. Mr. Williamson in a short address adopts the same style as Mr. Forsaith. Mr. J. O. Neill, in an address of a few lines, intimates his intention to become a candidate for this division of the city. At a subsequent meeting some rather singular disclosures were made concerning the Land Orders, which Mr. O. Neill it seems had furnished himself while in England to the amount of two hundred and fifty acres, in lieu of his 'expenditure on emigration.'' Mr. Daldy like Mr. Williamson refers to his great labors as the representative of this division. PARNELL. Mr. Reader G. Wood :— I am induced to become a candidate, because I think it advisable that, at least, you should have the option of electing a representative who has other opinions respecting the duties of that important trust than supposing them to consist in constantly and invariably supporting the measuresno matter what—of the Ministry of the day. From the views of the present Government I differ in many important particulars. Their Native Policy, which has resulted in confusion, has never been calculated to meet the wants of the Europeans, or to satisfy the reasonable expectations of the natives. It consists of a combination of the old "Flour and Sugar Policy" (witness Kohimarama), and the extreme of the' Coercive Policy (witness the Native Offenders Bill) : a combination which can, by no possibility, result in anything but disaffection and distrust, and which must necessarily check the prosperity and advancement of the Colony, as long as it lasts. With regard to other matters, those, in fact, that have reference principally to our own race, I bj no means agree with tho Ministry in the policy they have adopted and persuaded the Assembly to endorse. Their New Provinces Bill I regard as a shameful abandonment of some of its most important functions by the House of Representatives—a transfer, in fact, to the Mintstry of the power the house had, and ought to have held, in trust for the people. It is a measure which has enabled the Government, more than any other, to seize and to maintain that despotic control, towards which all their measures tend. Of their Militia Bills, Anns Bill, Native Offenders Bill, and the rest of their coercive measures; of the reckless extravagance with which they have wasted the large revenues of this country ; of their niggardly allowances to the Provinces, still more niggardly bestowed ; of their utter disregard of all restraining enactments, and of every check on their own will, I have not space to write. Should, however, you do me the honor of electing me as your representative, as far as my voice and vote will go (whether the house meet here or at Wellington), I will do what lies in my power to remedy .the evils under which this country labors, to restore to the Assembly some of those powers which it has been induced to divest itself, to give to the country something like Constitutional Government, to the Provinces a larger share of their own revenues, and to the administration of the Public Finances that care and j. economy which have been too much lost sight "t>f, and without which it is impossible longer to avoid heavy and grievous taxation. Mr. Theophilus Healb appeals to his former labors, and hopes that his accidental absence will not permit 'any unfair advantage to be taken.' FRA.NRLIN. Mr. Robert Graham again begs to offer himself as a candidate. Mr. M. G. Nixon likewise announces himself as a candidate, without saying a word of his views on any of the subjects now agitating the public mind. Mr. John Styak :— I pledge myself to support that Ministry only who will manifest a determination to prosecute the war with vigor until the natives are brought into complete subjection to British law, and have made ample compensation in land for the expenses of the war and the extensive losses sustained by the settlers. I shall also exert my utmost ability to reform the present most extravagant and injudicious expenditure of our revenue by doing away with many of the unnecessary and overpaid appointments which now crowd the various departments of our Government. I also take this opportunity to state that I am no place-hunter. Mr. J. A. Wilson is likewise up for this district, and says the • war should be energetically and perseveringly prosecuted.' NEWTON. Mr. George Graham having' been compelled to take Mrs. Graham for change of

air to the south, hopes that the electors will place him at the head of the poll,' when he will do his utmost • to prevent the removal of the seat of government' from Auckland, in which he has 4so great a stake.' Mr. C. A. Harris:— At a time when the stability of our Provincial Institutions is threatened, it is the duty of all who desire their preservation to come forward in their defence: should Ibe honored by your confidence it will be my endeavor to maintain the integrity of Provinces, believing that by so doing I shall be aiding to promote the true interest and the progress of the Colony of New Zealand. Mr. Frederick A. Bell is also a candate for Newton. ONEHUNGA. Mr. G. Maurice O Rorke makes a short address, without stating his views on an/ topic. Mr. Henry Weekes the same. NORTHERN DIVISION. Mr. Thomas Henderson again offers himself as a candidate in a few lines. Mr. J. R. Cooper says that he will support the Stafford Ministry, and oppose • Messrs. Carleton, Fox, and Featherston;' and considers that Auckland should 'remain the seat of government.' Captain Cooper (by order of Committee) is brought forward as a ' thorough provincialise* PENSIONER SETTLEMENTS. Mr. James Farmer merely announces his inttenion of offering himself as a candidate. Mr. W. Mason, the same. RAGLAN. Mr. Charles Taylor says:— Having always held opinions opposed to a centralising; policy, I should vote for the repeal of the "New Provinces Act." I am prepared to unite with the other representatives of this province in obtaining a sweeping reduction in the expenditure now lavished on an overgrown and daily increasing official staff, and to act in concert with those gentlemen that Auckland may hold the prominent position due to her in the government of the colony. SIONGONUI. Mr. Thomas Cheeseman says:— I freely assert that I am at issue with the present Government. Their policy is inimical to the well-being of the colony. It is unworkable, illiberal, and extravagantly expensive, and must eventually lead to increased taxation. But, in a young country like this, I consider that it would be a most fatal error to contract a permanent national debt: I shall, therefore, stedfastly resist all wasteful expenditure, and any attempt to force the material progress of the country beyond its ltgitimate capabilities. Whether Parliament assembles at Auckland or Wellington, I shall be found in my place. Captain Butler has likewise been brought forward for the district, but " declines taking any active part in the election," as he desires to be returned only by the " unbiased votes of his fellow-elec-tors." At a Bazaar held at the Odd Fellows' Hall a sum of £120 was realised towards the purchase of an organ for St. Matthews Church. Some district cricket matches has taken place. The one between Auckland and Parnell was a close one:—Auckland with two wickets to go down 124; Parnell 122. The armed force of Auckland, including Rifles, Cavalry, and Coast Guard numbers about 883, and the Militia about 800; making a total force of 1600 armed and drilled citizens. The coal prospects of Auckland are said to be bright. Coal is reported to exist even under the township of Mongonui, and up to deep water; and the Waihoihoi fields are said to be not inferior to "any in the world." Bishop Pompallier has returned to Auckland f'om Europe, and brought seventeen priests and four nuns to assist the sisters of mercy in their educational works. An address from the clergy and likewise one signed by 500 of the laity were read to the right reverend gentleman in the cathedral ; also a native address. A seaman named John O'Neill, of the ship Rob Roy, aged 23, was drowned in returning from shore to his ship at Queenstreet wharf. More deaths by accident have occurred:— Fatal Accident.—A. melancholy accideu* resulting in the death of a poor fellow of the nameof Carty, from Howick, occurred in excavating the foundations for the Savings' Bank, in Queen-street, near the Odd Fellows' Hall, on Monday, Dec. 31. The clift which Carty was in the act of undermining suddenly fell in upon and crushed him. His death was instantaneous. Coroner's Inquests.—An inquest was held at the Royal Hotel, Auckland, on the Bth ult., on view of the body of William Logan, aged 20 years, who was drowned in the harbor, on the day preceding, while bathing, under an almost vertical sun. The verdict returned was " Accidentally drowned." —Also at Onehunga on the 10th ult., on view of tho body ofachild 3£ years, of age named Giles Humphries; discovered at the botton of a well on Sunday, 9th ult., and taken out lifeless. It appeared in evidence that the child had been seen playing, at two p. in; at the mouth of the well, by a neighbor, and been desired to go away, but he was not missed by his parents until six p.m., when on search being made he was found as above. The well is an open one, and contains about eight feet of putrid water; it is situated on the premises of Captain Ninnis, and is in fact a most dangerous child-trap. It was stated that there are several such in the settlement. The jury returned a verdict of '■* Found drowned," and inveighed strongly against the practice of leaving wells uncovered. Fata.l Accident,—We regret to state that Mr. Trevarthen, one of our eldest settlers resident at the North Shore, received a kick in the stomach from one of his horses od the 7th ult. Dr. Stratford was in immediate attendance; he at once pronounced the stroke to be mortal, and the unfortunate sufferer died next morning, leaving a large family to lament their loss.

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AUCKLAND., Colonist, Volume IV, Issue 338, 15 January 1861

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AUCKLAND. Colonist, Volume IV, Issue 338, 15 January 1861

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