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RETURN OF FOOTBALLERS. INTERVIEW WITH MR E. McCAUSLAND.

In our issuo of yesterday we referred to the return of several of the native team by tho Mararoa, including Mi' E. McCausland, a player well known throughout New Zea land. Thinking our readero of nearly all classes would bo glad to have his remarks and opinions on the Home and Australian trip of the team, one of our reporters called on Mr McCausland at his home yesterday afternoon, and after the usual greeting the following conversation took place :—: — Reporter : How did you enjoy your trip, Mr McCausland? Mr McCausland: Splendidly. We had the gayest times imaginable from the very moment Aye started. Every man in the team, I believe, enjoyed himself thoroughly ; and no wonder, for no matter whore we went we were received like (princes — you know one or two of the fellows arc princes in their own country. After every match we had dinners or dancos, or some kind of amu&ement. Did you train much ? Oh, no. We had no time to train. Playing three times a week was quite as much training as we could stand, I can assuie you. The boys quite relished English beer, however, and we all think it did us good. Have the men changed much since they left ? Yes, considerably. Every man is heavier and stronger looking than he was. Some of them you would hardly know. Wynyard, Madigan, and Stewart aie perhaps most noticeable. The tiip has improved us in every way, I think, Where did you play most ? Most of our matches were played in Lancashire and Yorkshire, which are the great strongholds of Rugby in England. The Midland counties play the Association game chiefly, and in the South there is not much football played. We had a fortnight in Ireland, a short time in Wales, and one match in Scotland, at Havick. What &ort of crowds had you ? We made record gates nearly everywhere. At one place they told us we would not get £30 we astonished them by taking £150. The Avon't of it was that very many of the crowd were dead heads. Most of the grounds and stands belong to the clubs and all their members get in free ; and as nearly all the toAvn folk arc members, you can see how that works. Our best gate was at Hull where we had 12,000. Which part of your trip did you enjoy most? Our fortnight in Ireland. Of courpe we enjoyed ourselves exerywhore, but the Irishmen everywhere could not do enough tor us in their own estimation. They gave Ub the best of fun ; and then such nice girls ! We spent Christmas in Wales, and enjoyed that pretty little country immenfcelv. Our dinner atHawick was great fun. We had haggis to eat, whisky to drink, and tho bagpipes skirling. Tho Provost, a very old gentleman, got up and sang a song about Flodden consisting of verses of ten lines Avith a chorus of bix. He told us there were 99 verses. He mercifully gave only twenty-four. What sort of weather had you in England >. We were in England just six months to a day, and during that time not one of our matches was'postponed through bad weather. We did not feel the cold very much, not nearly so much as Aye expected, thongh Aye never saw the sun. However, it was a very mild Avinter. They put straAV on the grounds there Avhen a snowstorm is expected and clear it off before tho match. I suppose you saAv a good deal of England ? We saw pretty Avell eA'ery important place in it. One railway company booked us through the whole country. We had a sleeping car which Avas hitched on or off trains as lequired. As new chums what did you think of the old country? Woll, to .tell you the truth, we were not very much aAve-struck. Melbourne and Sydney had pretty avoll prepared us for the towns and so tho narrow streets and the hum of business were no new sensations. Tho conntry seemed to he too much given up to pasturing and not cropping. The castles are mostly fine old ruins, and their are many very beautiful spots round there, but on tho whole, with colonial conceit, I suppose, we like our own land best. What did they think of the team at Home? I think thoy would have been better pleased if Aye had beon darker and more savage looking. Tho Maoris in the team took best with tho crowds ; but " though I says it as shouldn't" Aye were all very ivell spoken of. There was great enthusiam eveiy where, and in spite of local feeling Aye had plenty of support. What about rough play? Oh, thero Avas more fuss made about that than it deserved. I don't think thero was anything more than ordinary in any of our matches. Few men got hurt considering the number of games Aye played. Local jealousy caused much of the talk about rough play. Each town has its club. IE we beat one club, and a neighbouring club beat us, the first raised at once a howl of rough play. What do you think of English football ? The game is vory last and scientffic. The new rules have improved it much. The passing of their teams is a treat to witnoss. We saw A r ery few matches, hoAvever, outside those Aye ourselves played in. Sbqddart, I think, is about the best back in England. Did your team improve much ? Decidedly. No team in England could touch us in, the forward division though avo i only played eight to , them nine. We still

play the centre half and from the experience of the trip I think it advisable, Wynyard is* a Avbnderfully improved man, j kicking and running splendid. Keogh is j very clever gaining all his tries with far less vyork than other men by feinting and dodging. Eliot we missod more than any othc- in the team, when he was absent. His bullocking was a shock to the Englishmen who are not used to that ,game. | Madigan was called the "Runaway House." I think Davy Gage was our best all-round back, as he could play very well anywhere. The forwards I are hard to separate, as all played well. Taiaroa was about the best dribbler, and Anderson porhaps, as hard a grafter as any. Maynard and Stewart were also very consistent. Wo had a very heavy team, but could always last the game splendidly. Wo Avent in mostly for running and passing, not nearly so much for dropping at goal. What about your Australian trip ? Oh, we could win all our matches there easily enough, though Sydney has considerably improved. Our fellows picked up the Victorian game pretty well, winning three matches and drawing one out of nine, but wo did not like it. The papers praised u& very much for our improvement in ib. How do you think the trip will pay ? Well, I believe some money Mas lost in England, but not much, and the managers will easily recoup themselves, I think, from their takings in Australia and New Zealand ? Do you think the team will visit Auckland ? Not for 50 per cent, net proceeds. It would not be worth their while. Will the trip unsettle the fellows much ? 1 don't think so. For my own part, I feel as if I had been away no more than a month, and I expect the others have much the same feeling. I shall settle to work at once jusb as contentedly as if I had been down to the Hot Lakes, perhaps more so. The interview ,then terminated. " Auckland Star," July 10.

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Bibliographic details

RETURN OF FOOTBALLERS. INTERVIEW WITH MR E. McCAUSLAND., Te Aroha News, Volume VII, Issue 384, 13 July 1889

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RETURN OF FOOTBALLERS. INTERVIEW WITH MR E. McCAUSLAND. Te Aroha News, Volume VII, Issue 384, 13 July 1889

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