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THE NEW ZEALAND FOOTBALLERS. (From Our Special Correspondent.) London, December 29.

Christmas lias nob, so far as I have been able to learn, been a particularly festive time for the New Zealand footballers. They have been playing hard throughout the holidays, nob always in the best of ■weather; but the "gates" seem to have been uniformly good, so 1 presume Mr Scott is satisfied. I see from the papers that Mr Scott has received an invitation to take the team round the Cape, or, in other words, South Africa. Before next mail I shall be able to ascertain what amount of truth there is in the rumoured offer, and whether the Maoris mean to accept it. On New Year's Day the team play at Bradford, and either theie or at Huddcrsfield I hope to catch them up again, and gather such gossip as is going. The following are tho detailed accounts of the matches as yet to hand :—: —

MAORIS Y. BROUGRTON. The visit of the now famous New Zealand team to the ground of the "Guiffins" attracted a large crowd on Saturday last, and they were rewarded by witnessing a really fine exposition of the Rugby game. As was generally expected, the " boys " proved much too strong for their opponents Broughton had got together a strong team , for the occasion, Romo having come from Cardiff specially to assist them, whilst the Maoris were still minus one or two of their best men. The splendid passing of the New Zealand backs and the powerful rushes of the forwards told a tale in the end, for although Broughton played up vigorously from start to finishj they were overmatched, and the New Zealanders achieved a substantial victory of two goals and two tries to a solitary minor. The attendance Avas about 5,000. The following is the account of the match from the Manchester "Sporting Chronicle:" — Payne started, and J. Warbrick returned to centre. Smart play by the Broughtonians carried the game well in^o the Maori quarters, where Payne, with a grand piece of work, compelled his opponents to save. Even play followed, but the superior passing tactics of the visitors began to tell its tale, and F. Warbrick, taking a pass from Keogh, scored a splendid try, which MeCausland failed to improve upon. Nothing further was scored up to half-time. On change of ends the Maoris at once began to press, and despite the plucky defence of Prince, Smith, and Sumner, managed to gain a try, William 3 scoring the point, but again was the kicker at fault. A thick mist now hung over the ground, and it was almost impossible to distinguish the players, and during this state of affairs Karauria gained a try, and Ellison successfully kicked the goal. Broughton now had a turn at attacking, but they could not get over the capital defence of the Maoris, and MeCausland ran the ball out from behind his own line, when Prince bad appeared certain to score. However, a splendid exposition of passing among the Maori back division left NY. Wynward in possession, who in the coolest possible manner dropped a goal amidst great cheering. Try as they would, tSrou^hton could not score, and were ultimately defeated. Result : — Maoris 2 goals, 2 tries, 1 minor Broughton 1 minor

MAORIS VERSUS WIGAN. The New Zealanders piid a visit to Wigan, and the ropes were lined by at least 8,000 spectators. Hatton started the ball for Wigan, Bullough spoiling McCausland's return. Anderton was immediately prominent by a splendid dodgy run, and several fiee kicks were allowed to the Maoris, Anderton relieving hia lines in grand style. Wigan now paid a flying visit to the Maoris' lines, but the pressure was smartly relieved by Gage and McCausland. Several tight packs then took place in neutral quarteis, Wigan holding their own against their stalwart opponents. Keogh, Elliott, and McCausland now shone in some brilliant passing. The home line being in danger, Halliwell got the ball again to midfield, and after some fine play by the home forwards, Wigan registered the first point, a minor. Splendid play now ensued by both teams, and Elliott, getting a free kick in the home 25, made a splendid attempt at goal, and keeping up the pressure, scored a dead ball. After the drop out, some line play ensued, Atkinson making his mark in midfield. Pilkington failed at goal, and Wigan were now pressed. Gage got a good try after a short run, no goal resulting. Hall-time now arrived, thoMaoris leading by 1 try 2 minors to Wigan's3 minors. On restai fciug Wigan pressed for atime, until Gage and Wynyard got the ball to the home lines, "Wynyarrt getting a capital try after a good run, and McG'ausland kicking a good goal. Very e\en play followed the kick-oIF, each end being vibited in turn, Wijran having hard lines, but only a dead ball le&ulted. Wigan now had the best of the play, and after some good opportunities another minor was scored, Pilkington's kick being charged down. F. Warbrick and Anderson dribbed finely, the foimer getting the third try, which was not converted. Slevin now got over from a good pass by Hatton, Pilkington failing at the place. After a grand game, the Maoris won by 1 goal 2 tries and 2 minors to Wigan 's 1 try 5 minors.

MAORIS Y. WALES. The contest between the Maoris and tteh c Welsh Internationals came oft on the Swansea Football Ground on Saturday afternoon. The match was announced to commence afc 2.45, but at three o'clock neither team had appeared on the field, and the " gate " was by no means as large as might have been expected, considering the interest which was supposed to centre aiound the event. The places pacred to the sixpenny patrons of football were very much better attended than the south bank, which was reserved for those who were prepared to pay one shilling. About a after three o'clock the Welshmen entered the field, looking as fresh as paint in their white pants and scarlet jerseys, and a few minutes afterwards the New Zealanders appeared, and were accorded a very hearty reception. The Maoris were altogether heavier than their opponents, though their black uniform did not show up so we'l against the greensward as the more attractive dress of the Welshmen. As the game uroceeded, crowds came trooping in, untifthe whole area around the field became black with spectators. It was estimated that not less than 7,000 spectators were present. The kick off by the Maoris, and the return by the Cwmry were both fine kicks, and the play for the first minute or so was exciting, the ball travelling pretty well all over the ground. Wales &oon exacted a minor from a long kick, and shortly afterwards a loud cheer announced that a try had been scored, and by Towers, who, it is raid, only got into the team by the skin of his teeth. First blood -was therefore drawn by a Swansea man. The point, was im-< proved upon, Webb kicking a rgoal from just in front of the posts. The Maoris showed splendid exhibitions of passing, but this did not pay, ground being lost. Soon George Thomas was seen sprinting

along, and another try was recorded in fu\ourof the Welshmen. The placo kick failed. The Welshmen now showed some clever dribbling, but this was met by some clever woik by one of tho Maoris, wlio played the ball with his knees right across the ground. Play for some time ensued near the half-way flag, bub the Maoris by pressure carried the play into the Welsh twenty-five. From a scramble a Maori got acros3 the line, but was carried quite ten yards? back into half-way. The advantage, however, was but momentary, and the Maoris again pressed, but Stadden relieved, and at half time the ball was in neutral territory. For the last ten minutes the Antipodeans had clearly the best of the gamo, but tho dofenco of the Welsh was too good to allow scoring. Tho second halt commenced in a shower of r.iin which, with the high wind, rendered play unpleasant. The proceedings for the first few minutes were uninteiesting, tho Maoiis hawng slightly the best of the game. The Welsh forwards, ho\ve\er, by a combined dribble, earned the ball into the visitors' twenty-live, but only ito have it returned to halt-way. Shortly I afterwards a most exciting piece of play was witnessed. Williams, the mammoth Maori, began a dribble, which was carried over the Welsh line, and a try seemedimmin ent, but George Thomas, gaining possession of the leather, by a grand, &tiong run, carlied the ball back to neutral territory, where he kicked. The Welsh forwards followed up well, and a try seemed inevitable, but the New Zealanders &a\ed well. Shortly afterwards Nicholls by a grand diibble,carried the ball acioss across the lit c. Warbrick tried to touch down, but, losing it, Nicholls tell on it and secured a try, which was not converted. The Maoiis then made a determined effoit to score forcing the play into the home twenty-tho, but relief soon came. The scarlet and white boys now began to press and Stadden, by a grand run, nearly got in. A minute or two later Wales got a free kick, but this was charged down and the Maoris worked up towards the Welsh goal line, but a Welshman kicked into touch, and time was called, Wales proving victorious by 1 goal 2 tries 3 minors, to nil. Tho cheering which greeted the result was hearty, and the players were escorted from the field by an admiring crowd. Towards the end ot the play the light got bad, and it became difficult to distinguish individual players. The following are the details of the game: Hill kicked off towards the entrance end, and Gage returned into touch at the twentyfive. Two closely-fought packs ensued The Maoris dribbled down to the centre, when Wales, for off side play, obtained a free kick, and a minor resulted. After the kick out Keogh, McCausland, and W. Wynyard did some fine passing, but thanks to the grand tackling of the Welshmen no ground was gained. Arthur got away, but when chucking to George Thomas lost the ball. Keogh threw to Wynyard, who lan to the centre. G. Thomas, by a punt, lost ground for Wales, but this was rapidly regained by passing between Arthur, George Thomas and Biiggp. A scrimmage ensued in the twenty-five, where Towers, picking up, perfoimed one of his inimitable tricks, finishing by grounding the ball over the line, amid tremendous cheers. Webb took the place and easily converted. Williams kicked oft, and Arthur, making a feeble reply, packs took place in dangerous proximity to the Welsh goal. George Thomas, by a short run and kick, promptly relieved, and J. Warbrick was tackled by Towers before he could reply. Immediately after George Thomas picking up in home territory, lan along the touch line at terrific speed, and eluding all pursuit, scored a try, which Webb failed to improve upon. Williams kicked out, and Stadden obtained a free kick at the halfway flag. Webb made a good attempt at goal, a minor resulting. McCaasland kicked out, and Ellison made a .strong 1 run into the Welsh half. Stadden passed out to Arthur, who transferred to Geoige Thomas. The latter kicked to J. Warbrick. The Maori back failed to return well, but Lee, by a fine dribble, carried the ball down tho ground. Nicholls replied with an equally fine dribble, but J. Warbrick, McCauslane, and Gage, passing beautifully, ran into the Welsh territory. Keogh obtained a couple of "trees," and play was kept for a few minutes in the Welsh half. A. Warbrick dribbled down to within a few yards of the Welsh goal, but Stadden and Garret lelieved. McCausland obtained a mark, and the Maoris continued to have tho better of the game. "Elliott made a gallant attempt to get over the line, and Ellison actually got over, but he was carried back into play. George Thomas, allowing the ball to go between his legs, placed the Welsh goal in serious danger. Half-time score. Wales 1 goal 1 try 2 minors, Maoris nil. Williams kicked off for the Maoris, and the visitois had the best of the game. Keogh attempted to pa&s to McCausland, but Towers stepped in between and dribbled the leather down to the centre. A shoit delay occurred, Chailie Thomas being temporarily laid up, but he soon resumed his position. Aithur no>v badly missed Elliott, who made a fine run along the touch line. Nicholls, who was in grand form, however, by a very effective dribble legained the ground thus lost. George Thomas ran back twenty yards, and again tho Welsh twenty-five was the scene of opeiations. Arthur, by a run, took the ball to tho centie, and a grand combined rush carried the bail down to the Maori end. A magnificent dribble by .Ellison and Lee was the next piece of fine play, and a tiy seemed inevitable for the vi&itors, when George Thomas, coming to the rescue, maoc a grand mn to the contre amid great applause. Bland, Nicholls and Bowen rushed the leather over the Maori line. J. Warbrick fell on tho ball, but failed to make it dead. Towers, running in, kicked the ball further on, and Nicholls, promptly falling on it, obtained a try. Webb made a bad attempt at goal. F. Warbrick and W. Wynyard, by a couple of really magnificent runs, got the ball up to the Welsh line. Tho visitois forced play for a few minutes, until a free kick brought Wales relief. Arthur ran down to half-way, but Ellison and Elliott, by strong lunning, gained part of the lost ground. YV. Wynward, who was far and away the best of the visiting three-quarters, now got away capitally, but the Welsh forwards carried the leather rapidly back. Gage was now conspicuous for some clever defensive play. Stadden, pretending to pass, deceived the Maoris, and almost got over the line before being brought down. The Welshmen obtained amark, and the ball was placed for Webb, whose kick was, however, charged down, and the Maori forwards rushed into the Welsh twenty-five. Ellison, Lee, Williams, and Karauria, using their feet very cleverly, trundled the greasy ball over the ground at a capital pace, but Webb .""proved smart enough to pick up and drop well into touch. The thick, misty rain which now fell made it very difficult to recognise the players. It was evident, however, that the New Zealanders were keeping the ball well outside their territory, until the referee's whistle announced that the game, which had been most stubbornly contested throughout, was now over. Final score ; Wales— l goal 2 tries 3 minors Maoris— Nil

The immense crewd of spectators' who had witnessed the encounter heartily cheered the players on both sides as they left the field for the Swansea Baths, and here again upon their entrance and exit were the signal for loud cheering, tho favourites — tho " All Whites," captain, Griffiths, of Llanelly, and W. Bowen being received with especial enthusiasm — pro bably because they were the only representatives of their clubs. The following were the teams : — Wales: Back, J. Webb (Newport); three-quarter back?, George Thomas (Newport), C. Arthur (Cardiff), GaiTett(Penaitb), and Morman Biggs (Cardiff) ; half-backs, Stadden (Uewsbury) and Charlie Thomas (Newport) ; forwards, Towers, Bowen (Swansea), Hannen, Harding (Newport), C. Griffiths (Llanelly), Hill (captain), Nicholls, and Bland (Cardiff). Maoris : Back, J. Warbiick (captain) ; three quarter backs, Gage, W. Wynyard, and McCausland ; half-backs, Elliott, Keogh, and F Warbrick ; forwards, Ellison, Williams, Webster, Karauria, Lee, Stow art, A. Warbrick and G. Wynyaid. Messrs Taiaioa (New Zealand) and H. Lyne (Wales) were umpires, and Mr Mortimer, of Dewsbury, referee.

MAORIS VERSUS SWANSEA. On Christmas Evo the New Zealand beam played a stiong local 15 at Swansea. The Cambiia " Daily Leader' thus details particulars : Ever .since ifc was announced that; j Mr Bryant had succeeded in making ihe h'xturo, the match was looked to by the lovers of our great winter pastime in this end of the country with the liveliest anticipation, and the greatest confidence w\s expressed on all sides that a brilliant display of Rugby football would bo witnessed. The visitois had succeeded in lowering the colours of somo of the leading clubs in the country, and as ihe Swansea club had suffeied but one defeat this sea?on, there was every reaeon to look forward to a gigantic tussle. Unfortunately, Jupiter Pluvius cruelly stepped in, and lelenfclessly dashed such hopeb to the ground. The bad weather experienced during the past week did not improve ; on the contrary, the rain poured down in ceaseless torients, and rendered it impossible for both teams to play the gamo affected by them. Instead of the brilliant display of scientific football which would otherwise have been witnessed, the state of the ground and the atmospheiic conditions made it utterly impossible to play the game as it was intended to bo played by those who framed the llugby rules. Neat and effective passing, pretty and accuiate kicking could not be accomplished, and the gamo was necessarily conhned to the for wards. Unhappily for Swansea, many of its prominent players (such as Davi ] Gwynn, Whapman and Bishop, three out of four tegular three quarters) aie now on the injured list. The two former could not play at all, while the latter, who is not without some reason, considered one of the cleverest three-quarteis in Wales, though putting in an appearance, was still sufleiing so much from a kick he received in the trial match at Newport last Thursday week, that he could not play up to his true form. The unfa vom able weather is also accountable for the compaiative smallne-s of the gate, for had it becu fine, a tremendous crowd hailing from all the surrounding districts would undoubtedly have been present. Swansea won the toss, and played with their backs to the pavilion. Ellison kicked off, and Matthews, failing to hold, the Swansea goal was at once in danger. Bishop came to the rescue with a kick into touch, and the Swansea forwards lushed up to the twenty-five flag. McCausland made a tricky run down, and F. Warbrick kicked the ball over the line, compelling Thorogood to kick the ball dead. Thorogood, by u good kick, relieved to the centie, but McCausland kicked down. Walter Evans and W. Bowen dribbled up to the centre. Bishop and Wolfe, by grand tackling-, stopped the passing of the Maori three-quarters. McCausland, W. Wyn yard, and Karauria earned the ball to the Swansea line, but Bi&bop kicked into touch. Walter Evans was now loudly cheeied for a grand dribble to the Maori twenty-fhe. W. Wynyaid punted back to half-way, Avhere the Maoris obtained a free kick, which was charged r\o\\ n. Bishop again came to the front with good tackling, ar.d W. Williams, H. Bevan, Towers and Cronin dribbled into the twenty-five. Thorogood kicked up to Keogh, who teturncd veil, and George James dribbled very cleverly; Kaiauria, coming through a pack splendidly, dribbled down to Thorogood, who had to save by kicking into touch. For off-side play, a free kick was obtained against Swansea. Williams attempted a goal, but the ball was too slippery, and Walter Evan*, obtaining possession, kicked into the Maoii half. W. H. Jones made a capital run, and shortly after kicked over the Maori line, thus exacting a minor for Swansea and equalising the scoie. \V. Wyn}ard kicked out, and the ball rolled into touch at half-way. From the lino out Floweis and Matthews dribbled up to the visitors' twenty-five. Swansea now pressed, and for some minutes looked like scoring. McCausland, by a run and kick, sent the ball into touch ab half-way. The visitois obtained a free, and the ball was worked down to the Swansea twenty-five, when BMiop dribbled to the half-way. W. Williams and Cronin carried it up to the Maori twenty-five. W. 11. Jones passed to Bishop, who almost dropped a goal. Williams and Kcogh dribbled out to neutral ground, but the Swansea men at once carried it back to the twenty-five. A mark was obtainoJ by Swansea, and the ball was placed for Jones, whose attempt at goal was exceptionally good. F. Warbrick made a grand run, getting by the home three-quarters, but was floored in the 25 by Thorogood, amid great applause. At half-time the scoie stood : Swansea, 3 minors to one minor. Towers started the second half with a dribble, and forced the ball into the Maori twenty-nve. W. Wynyard rushed up to Thorogood, who had now a very bu^y time of it. Keogh, McCausland, and Williams, all cairied the ball up to him in turn, but ho acquitted himself grandly, clearing his line every time. Exciting play now took place in front of the Swansea goal. At last Keogh passed out to McCausland, who obtained a try amid great applause. McCausland failed at goal. H. Bevan, Towers and Orrin carried the ball down to the Maori line, but W. Wynyard at once replied by a fine dribble to tho Swansea line. Here Elliott picked up and fell. A long dispute arose here as to whether a try had been scored, but ultimately the referee decided against Swansea. The attemjat at goal failed. Directly after the kick out, Keogh ran in again, the Swansea men, with the exception of Thorogood, not attempting to tackle him, under the impression that a rule had been infringed. I The referee's decision was again for" the Maoris, and so dissatisfied were the Swansea men with his verdict that they did not attempt to charge. McCausland converted. The Maoris continued to press until Bi&hop and Matthews by clever lacking relieved to the twenty-five flag. Towers and Walter Evans dribbled into the Maori half, but the leather was soon carried back to the Swansea territory. Walter Evans dribbled down to Gage, who smartly picked up and kicked into touch. W, H. Jones was

getting away finally when he was tackled by J. Warbrick. W. Bowen and Bishop forced play into the Maori twenty-five. Hero again tho Swansea forwards had a capital chance of scoring, but failed to avail themselves of it. Directly after W. H. Jones was within an ace of dropping a Only a minor resulted. Time was then callod, the score reading : Maoris — 1 goal 2 tries 4 minors Swansea — 4 minors The following were the teams :—: — Maoris. - Back, Gage ; three-quartcis, J. Warbrick, W. Wynyard, McCausland, and F. Warbrick ; half-backs, Keogh and W, Warbrick ; forwards, Ellison, G. Wynyard, Webster, Lee, Williams, Arthur Warbrick, Karauria, and Stewart. Swansea. — Back, Thorogood ; three-quarter-backs, W. H. Jones, E. Bishop, A. A. Matthews, and Arthur Wolfe ; halfbacks, Oirin and (J. James; hi wards, W. H. Towers (captain), W. Bowen, T. Williams, W. Williams, Walter R. Evans, Cobncr, Cronin, and Harry Bevan.

THE MAORIS Y. NEWPORT. This match was played at Newport on Boxing Day before a tremendous concourse of spectators, upwards of 10,000 " Tailys " assembling to witi.oss the fray. The ground was saddened by many days' rain — the game was, in consequence, chiefly a forward one Tho -\ ibitors kicked oil", and in a very few minutes showed that Lhoy were far nioie than a match for thoir opponents. Tho iramo was in the Ncwpoi tonians' tcnitory throughout, but they made such a stubborn resistance that no goals were scored. In the end, the New Zcalandcrs triumphed by three tries and six minors, as against three minors. Mr E. S. Richaids, of Swansea, was a satisfactory leferee. New Zealand p^ ers : Joe Warbiick, ISlcCausland, Gage, \V. Wynyaul. F. WarbricU, Keo^h, G. Williams. A. Warbiick, Ellison, A. Webster, E. Maynard, D. Slewait, 11. Lee, and Taiaroa. To-day the Maoiis conclude their Welsh tour at Cardiff.

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THE NEW ZEALAND FOOTBALLERS. (From Our Special Correspondent.) London, December 29., Te Aroha News, Volume VI, Issue 341, 9 February 1889

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THE NEW ZEALAND FOOTBALLERS. (From Our Special Correspondent.) London, December 29. Te Aroha News, Volume VI, Issue 341, 9 February 1889

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