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BATHING FATALITY.

DEATH OF DR H. D. BEDFORD. DROWNED AT WHANGAREI. Very keen regret was felt when news was received in Christchurch last evening that Dr H. D. Bedford, of Otago University, had been drowned while bathing at Whangarei yesterday morning. Harry Dodgshun Bedford was the only son of Mr Walter Seott Bedford, formerly a woollen merchant of Leeds, and afterwards a tailor in Invereargill and then in Dunedin. He was born in Leeds in August, 1877, and up to the age of eight lie was educated at a public school at Morley, a few miles from Leeds. In 1886 he came to New Zealand with his parents, and his education was continued at a public, school in Invereargill. On reaching the sixth standard, he left school to assist his father in the tailoring business. But he left that occupation to take up farming, and afterwards he was employed at blaeksmithing. While engaged at "the Southland Implements Works he began to study, and 12 months later he matriculated. Then he decided to study law. His parents removed to Wellington, and he studied there for a year. Then he went to Auckland and kept terms for two years at Auckland University College. While there he won the College oratory prize. At the age of 22 he returned to Dunedin. Two years later (in 1901) he graduated Bachelor of Arts at Otago University College. He also won the Macandrew Scholarship in political economy and the University Senior Scholarship in political science. In 1902 he graduated Master of Arts, with honours in political science. While at Otago University he twice represented the college in inter-collegiate debating tourneys, and carried off honours in those contests. In the year of his graduation as M.A. he stood for the Caversham seat in the House of Representatives/ at a by-election, but his concentration on studies had caused him to be little known, and he was defeated. However, at the general elections of 1902 he topped the poll for the Dunedin City seat against four other candidates. Dr*Bedford secured 10.0S8 votes, a record number of votes for the old city seats in New Zealand. The Hon. J. A. Miller was second to him in the election for that seat.

Mr Bedford, as he was then, was elected as an Independent Liberal, and in his brief political career he was often hostilely critical of the Seddon Administration. During his term of representation he associated himself with the late Messrs G. Laurenson and T. E. Taylor, and with Mr F. M. B. Fisher, in an effort to establish a new Radical Party, the "New Liberals." But the result of the famous "Seddon voucher" case, in which charges made by Messrs Fisher and Taylor were disproved, alienated a great deal of support from the new party. In the general elections of 1905 Mr Laurenson was the only one of the leaders of the "New Liberals" to retain his seat. At that election the old city electorates had been subdivided. Mr Bedford stood for Dunedin North, and was defeated by Mr A. R. Barclay. After that he applied himself more vigorously to the profession of a barrister. He graduated LL.B. in 1906, and subsequently became law lecturer at the Otaijo University, but later he relinquished that position in order to become a lecturer in economics at the University. He graduated LL.M., and subsequently LL.D. A few years ago the lectureship in economics was raised to the status of a professorial chair, together with several other lectureships. In 1911 Dr Bedford stood for the Dunedin West seat, but was beaten by the Hon. J. A. Millar. Apart.from that, his active interest in politics since his defeat in 1905 had been confined to the prohibition campaign. Recently, Dr Bedford visited England and France as a commissioner for the Y.M.C.A. in connection with that body's war work. On his return he began to give lectures in the interests of the Y.M.C.A. war fund. A few weeks ago he gave two lectures in Christchurch, ami he was on his lecturing tour when he met his death. He was to have spoken in Christchurch again next Monday evening. He leaves a widow and four children, "having been married, in 1907, to a daughter of Mr S. N. Brown, of "Maori Hill, Dunedin. It. is said that the late Dr. Bedford was quite a competent swimmer and surfer. During his last visit to Christchurch he paid a visit to New Brighton, along with Mr W. J. Mason, seeretarv of the Christchurch Y.M.C.A. They went in for a bathe, and the impression left on Mr Mason's mind was that Dr. Bedford was a very capable man in the water. He took a few lessons on a surfing board, but after he discarded the board he swam and dived in the breakers in a fashion which showed that he was no mere apprentice in the art of swimming.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SUNCH19180218.2.31

Bibliographic details

BATHING FATALITY., Sun, Volume V, Issue 1254, 18 February 1918

Word Count
818

BATHING FATALITY. Sun, Volume V, Issue 1254, 18 February 1918

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