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"HARBOUR LIGHT."

LYTTELTON'S PICTURE THEATRE. The formal opening of the Lyltelton Picture Company's theatre "Harbour Light," took place last night. Long before 8 o'clock large numbers of people were wailing to gain admission, and were entertained with selections by the Lyttelton Marine Band. The theatre, of whjch the exterior is of while stucco, was brilliantly illuminated. The interior is fitted up in an elaborate manner, the sealing arrangements give an uninterrupted view of the screen from any part of the house, and there is an excellent projecting apparatus which ensures a steady, clear and brilliant picture being shown. Mr A. Lane, of Christchurch, is the manager, and the music is supplied by Mr Howard Moody. Mr .1. T. Norton (Deputy-Mayor) in declaring the theatre open, said he would have to apologise for the absence of the Mayor, Mr Radcliffc, who through sickness, was prevented from taking part in the opening ceremony, and he was sure that the audience would all join him in sincere regret for his Worship's absence. Continuing. Mr Norton said that the promoters of the theatre were to be heartily congratulated upon their efforts to provide not only a beautifully finished, but also a first-class picture house, and it was to be hoped the public would show their appreciation by patronising their own local picture palace, lie felt sure that the promoters on their part would provide the best pictures, and see that the people of Lyttelton would get satisfaction in every way. Mr Norton in concluding bis speech wished the "Harbour Light" Picture Palace prosperity, and dulv declared it open. Mi' 0. T. .!. Alpers, on behalf of the directors, then briefly addressed the audience. lie wanted the people lo understand that he was in no way connected with any pictures, other than being the "Harbour Light's" solicitor. Nevertheless he thought that the moving pictures were a great source of education, especially in war-time. A person on going lo Hie pictures would often see a great man on the other side of the world, and be able lo judge what he was like by the expression on his face. In concluding his speech, Mr Alpers thanked the Deputy-Mayor for his good wishes, and congratulated Lyttelton on having such a line picture theatre.

A very good programme was then submitted, the lirst picture being one of Salisbury's Wild Life lilnis depicting wild birds and animals in (heir natural slate. A humorous study "When in Home," also pleased Ihe audience, and the popular (ilm favourite, Clara Kimball Voting, appeared in "The Dee]) Purple," a drama of great heart interest.

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"HARBOUR LIGHT." Sun, Volume IV, Issue 970, 21 March 1917

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