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FOR KING AND EMPIRE.

DARDANELLES CASUALTIES.

SERGEANT A. J. DOWNINGWith the death of Sergeant Albert Joseph Downing, of the Wellington Battalion, who has been killed in action," New Zealand Rugby loses a great forward. He is the second member of the New Zealand teams which visited California in 1013 and Australia in 11)14 who has laid down his life for. his country. "Doolan" Downing, as he was popularly known, was of the type of forward which has become famous in other Rugby countries as representative of New Zealand—big, strong, fast, brainy, clever with hands arid feet, dashing, and resourceful. He

was a conscientious forward, always putting his weight into, the tight play, but it was in line-out work and in the loose that he was at his best. He was great in attack and strong in defence —his tackling was very souiid. Downing always played hard football, but it was always clean. He was of a fine disposition, and he made hosts of friends.

Downing was about 28 years olef. He was born in Port Ahuriri, and was educated at the Marists' Bros. School there, and then, when his parents removed to Napier, at the Marist Bros.' School in Napier. For a time he was engaged in farming, but he returned to Napier, and entered the employment of a firm of carriers and coal dealers. He had many opportunities to join th&t firm\clerical staff, but he preferred outdoor life. He played foi k the Marist Bros.' Old Boys' Rugby Club in Napier, and soon became a Hawke's Bay representative. But it was not until the New Zealand Rugby Union instituted its scheme of tours by teams representing the country unions of the two islands that Downing had a chance to earn wider fame. He was a member of the North Island country team of 1912, and was in the North Island team in 1912, 1913, and 1914. In 1913 and 1914 he played for the Marist Bros.' Old Boys' Club in Auckland, and was an Auckland representative. As already stated, he was also a New Zealand representative, and one of the best. He went to the front with the sth Reinforcements. PRIVATE T. J. QUAID. Private T. J. Quaid, who is report r j ed wounded, is the second son of Mr, Thomas Quaid, of Quaid's Road, Marshland. He is 20 years of age, and was educated at the Marshland School. Private Quaid was wellknown in cycling circles. He was a prominent member of the Marsh-

land Cycling Club, being on the committee for some time. He was a winner of many road races and track races throughout Canterbury, and was always noted for being a good, clean sport. He was also a member of the local football and cricket club. When the war broke out he immediately enlisted, and went away with the Main Expeditionary Force.

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https://paperspast.natlib.govt.nz/newspapers/SUNCH19150911.2.50

Bibliographic details

FOR KING AND EMPIRE., Sun, Volume II, Issue 496, 11 September 1915

Word Count
477

FOR KING AND EMPIRE. Sun, Volume II, Issue 496, 11 September 1915

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